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Thread: Spoodle Breeder NSW

  1. #1

    Default Spoodle Breeder NSW

    Hi There,

    My husband and I would like to welcome and Spoodle Puppy into our lives. I also plan to train the puppy to work with Children in therapy. Does any one know of a reputable breeder/s within Sydney / NSW? Any advice is greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Spoodle Love

  2. #2

    Default

    IMO It's a cross breed, And any Ethical reputable Registered breeder Would call it what it is a Poodle X Spaniel Oh i do hope you find what you looking for.. like puggerup said Back yard breeders and puppy mills and pet shops...
    Last edited by four socks; 08-10-2009 at 09:08 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    2,561

    Default

    Welcome to the forums.

    As has been pointed out, a 'Spoodle' is actually just a cross bred dog. It isn't a defined breed. If you breed a 'Spoodle' to a 'Spoodle' the puppies look nothing like the parents. Whereas, if you bred a Poodle to a Poodle, the puppies look like a Poodle... hence one of the the defining differences between a cross bred dog and a purebred dog. Spoodles are just cross bred dogs.... in my day, we called them mutts or mongrels.

    Because there isn't a registry as such of cross bred breeders, the only way of finding out where one is to be found is to google or from a referral. This is a little haphazard as you might imagine.

    Is there any reason why you have chosen a cross bred dog and not a Poodle or a Spaniel in their own right?

    The best advice I could offer, apart from looking at a pedigree dog as the best choice instead, is to research the person selling the puppies. Look at the parents. Look at the home where the dogs are kept. Ask the breeder about the long term health of the puppy. As you are in NSW, the puppies MUST be microchipped and vaccinated before sale (this is law) and they must be 8 weeks of age or older. Be careful of scammers.... there are thousands of them out there.
    Last edited by Anne; 08-11-2009 at 07:19 AM. Reason: Spellink....
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Launceston, TAS
    Posts
    21

    Default

    On the note of cross breeds...
    A labradoodle cross a labradoodle creates offspring that look like it's parents. And the grandchildren look like their parents and grandparents. Has it been declared a new breed?

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    Welcome to the forums.

    As has been pointed out, a 'Spoodle' is actually just a cross bred dog. It isn't a defined breed. If you breed a 'Spoodle' to a 'Spoodle' the puppies look nothing like the parents. Whereas, if you bred a Poodle to a Poodle, the puppies look like a Poodle... hence one of the the defining differences between a cross bred dog and a purebred dog. Spoodles are just cross bred dogs.... in my day, we called them mutts or mongrels.

    Because there isn't a registry as such of cross bred breeders, the only way of finding out where one is to be found is to google or from a referral. This is a little haphazard as you might imagine.

    Is there any reason why you have chosen a cross bred dog and not a Poodle or a Spaniel in their own right?

    The best advice I could offer, apart from looking at a pedigree dog as the best choice instead, is to research the person selling the puppies. Look at the parents. Look at the home where the dogs are kept. Ask the breeder about the long term health of the puppy. As you are in NSW, the puppies MUST be microchipped and vaccinated before sale (this is law) and they must be 8 weeks of age or older. Be careful of scammers.... there are thousands of them out there.


    Great post , no need to say anything as all has been said
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by laurenfreda View Post
    On the note of cross breeds...
    A labradoodle cross a labradoodle creates offspring that look like it's parents. And the grandchildren look like their parents and grandparents. Has it been declared a new breed?


    Not that I know of
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by laurenfreda View Post
    On the note of cross breeds...
    A labradoodle cross a labradoodle creates offspring that look like it's parents. And the grandchildren look like their parents and grandparents. Has it been declared a new breed?
    Not sure where you get that information from but it is wrong on all accounts.

    Labradoodles have what is called an F1 cross (Poodle crossed with a Lab) and an F2 cross (F1 crossed with an F1). The reason they are given this additional title is the fact that you can not cross an F1 with and F1 and get a dog with the same features as an F1. An F1 is only guaranteed when you cross the Lab with the Poodle.

    This failure to produce a dog with consistent features is why the Blind Society stopped their breeding program.

    The Labradoodle of Australia Association keeps a registry and are determined to ensure that the dogs they breed, both F1 and F2, are healthy and happy dogs. There are controls in place and records kept, which I like. Out of all of the cross bred dogs, these are the only ones that are trying to legitmately breed healthy and sound dogs, even though they know they can not and will not probably ever get conformity of the F1.
    Last edited by Anne; 08-11-2009 at 09:21 AM. Reason: Typos....
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  8. #8

    Default

    "Spoodles" ie cocker x poodles that I have met have all been hyperactive and have massive, hard to manage coats of varying texture, length and appearance. They can also shed like nothing else, as it seems can most things when crossed with poodles.

    Like all of these named crossbreeds they also display an alarming tendency to often grow much bigger than either parent. Health problems are rife as there is no regulated testing for genetic problems and they are often bred from less than healthy or sound stock to start with.

    Please be very careful. Some people have lovely experiences with these sort of dogs but there is an awful lot of heartache and disappointment around them as well. And there is a sad and regular stream of them through pounds and shelters...

    Cute fluffy puppies - buyer beware indeed

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central QLD
    Posts
    188

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    Try rescuing if thats the breed that you have in mind. Because of the unpredictable nature of cross breeds and the unethical standards that BYB and puppy mills use, our shelters are filled with cross breeds.

  10. #10

    Default Name calling

    Hi, I can fully understand the positives of buying a purebred animal from a registered breeder with ethical and professional standards etc. However, to my understanding and research, I believe that all dogs originate from cross breeding - mongrels! Ouch! You only have to Google the history of any breed to discover their origins of breed.
    With this said, it is only a matter of time before Spoodles and other mongrel X dogs will be a registered breed. I believe that this is a step in the right direction (if it's done professionally), there are many purebred animals that look nothing like their original doggie-ancestors, they have been over bred and manipulated for centuries. Let's consider genetic deficits too. Far too many pruebred animals living a dreadful existence due to over-breeding, public demand, showing and the like!
    I am not attacking the purebred (if there is such an animal), I just want to state the other side of the debate. There are Spoodle breeders that are trying to do the right thing and offer quality animals, with strong blood lines, similar to those purebred kennels. Yes, do your home work, inspect kennels and select a quality animal based on your own research, judgement and personal need.

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