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Thread: Pls help identifying the breed

  1. #1

    Default Pls help identifying the breed

    Hi, I have this beautiful 5 month old girl from the shelter. I got her when she was 3 months old and she has grown big since. They told me she's a mastiff cross. They weren't sure what she is crossed with. She's starting to show some behavioural problems with my 4 yr old son. So I'm trying to find out more about her breed details. I asked the shelter if she will be a large dog as I know mastiff is a large breed but they assured me its only going to be a medium size dog because of her paws.

    Can anyone tell by looking at the pic what she is crossed with?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    I would be more concerned with the behaviour, unlikely to be the breed. Where are you?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by farrview View Post
    I would be more concerned with the behaviour, unlikely to be the breed. Where are you?
    I'm in NSW. Well I raised it with a vet during a check up. He said training her will do but she doesn't have a social issue as she is super friendly with everyone else.

    I looked up Mastiff and the information said that they get along with children fine. Anyway I'm still curious to know what she is crossed with so I can read up on their info.

    I did take her to puppy preschool. Lol she's learned what sit means and she listens when food or reward is involved. I can't afford another $220 for her to learn just another commend.

  4. #4
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    Do a search on here, I can think of many times people have posted about training and links. Sorry just not at my fingertips. I use this forum a lot for training tips.

  5. #5
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    Your dog has some Amstaff in there and who knows what else. A mastiff is a large molloser type, giant breed, and I'm sick of pounds and vets calling dogs mastiff x. There is no molloser in your dog. $220 is very steep for puppy training, message or email me and I will see if I can help you

    inline_k9 @ yahoo . com
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  6. #6
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    She's starting to show some behavioural problems with my 4 yr old son.
    Dogs often mistake children for other dogs... She looks Amstaff or Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix to me.

    If you yell at her, scold her or shake her or hit her for being inappropriate with your son - she may blame your son.

    If your son has done anything inappropriate (I read one sad case where the dog was PTS after biting the child and they found a pencil jammed in its ear) - the dog will defend itself.

    Hence it's a really good idea to supervise them when ever they are together and stop any inappropriate behaviour by either of them. Helps if your dog likes having her collar grab (ie you've paired grabbing her collar with giving her something (food) that she likes).

    You use food to reward your dog - until they've learned the behaviour and the cue. And after that you start rewarding more intermittently - like the way a pokie machine pays out. One way to do this is to reward average or better - ie if the dog is slow to perform you can reward with just praise or even interrupt the dog so it can't finish a slow sit for example. If the dog does a really fast sit, you can reward with food and praise and a quick game of tug or fetch or a game your dog likes.

    But I agree with Nekhbet - contact her for some professional advice. If you can get some video of what you mean by your dog being inappropriate with your son that would be helpful for Nekhbet.

    And there are a few good trainers in NSW for people with problem dogs.

    Dogs only get along fine with children if they are trained and the children are trained. It's possible for a mastiff or amstaff etc to be great with children but it comes from setting boundaries and rewarding good behaviour (like walking away if the child is too boisterous or huggy). Otherwise most dogs will treat children like puppies or other dogs and may bite too hard when "correcting" them or telling them off. Cos children's skin is not as thick as dog skin. But the dog only knows that if you train bite inhibition.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 08-17-2015 at 07:32 PM. Reason: fixed my quote - oops

  7. #7

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    Taking your food based training on board also including my son in this to help them bond. However no , my son hasn't done anything to warrent this behavior. She's an outside dog and I'm always iutside with them purely because I wouldn't leave my 4 yr old with any dogs alone.

  8. #8
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    Dogs do sometimes find children confromting. They move fast, they can be loud and they often make advances to dogs that dogs find confronting. The child may not be doing anything apparently obvious to you but a dog may see things differently. Do you know anything of of the history of your dog prior to adoption? She may have been separated early from her mother and siblings. She may also be insecure and is bonding with you which is causing the issues with your son. Having her outside may also not be helpful as it it does tend to reduce the ability to bond at what could be a critical stage for her. Having her crate trained and in the house with the family is always helpful in my opinion. She gets used to another side of your son rather than perhaps running in the backyard.

    By the way what sort of undesirable behaviour is she exhibiting towards your son and how do they interact?

    It is definitely something to get advice on now as these things tend to escalate and become more entrenched as the dog grows.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-16-2015 at 06:00 PM.

  9. #9
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    Amstaff, no molloser breed/mastiff in there. dinky head, wrong shaped head completely for a mastiff.
    nothing to do with foot size. which can be small or large in various molloser breeds.

    the notion that a"type of breed" is good with children, is a fallacy.
    trained supervised kids/trained supervised dogs are good together though.

    I have two nieces, that are nasty horrible humans, both of them back yard bred, by a couple of intellectually disabled socially aggressive humans. And can cause child/owner aggro in 5 mins here, they are so disgusting. I want to crate the entire family, and serve them their meals. Only releasing them, to exit my front door. But as that's not ok apparently, i crate my dogs instead, so they cannot get at them. I have to padlock the crates, or they will interfere with the dogs, regardless of what i have told them. Beware, kids/dogs.

  10. #10
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    Dogs that are outside only are high on the bite statistics ie in the cases of serious dog bites that require hospital (or worse), a high percentage of the serious biters - have been outside only dogs.

    You still haven't explained what your "behavioural problems" are. Or what you do when they happen. Both bits of information are very important.

    But I guess - bottom line we can't tell what kind of dog she is from your picture and the breed is largely irrelevant to your problem. No dogs are supposed to be aggressive or inappropriate with their human owners, but that takes the right training with all dogs.

    Where breed is a factor - is that a dog like the one in your picture can do a lot more damage very quickly than a very small dog like a bichon friese.

    https://positively.com/articles/fata...ommon-factors/

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