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Thread: Puppy biting and scaring daughter.

  1. #1

    Default Puppy biting and scaring daughter.

    Hi its Juliette with Louis, 9 week old French bulldog, again after only 5 days at home my daughter is getting a bit frightened of him as he is biting.
    The rest of the family are coping and he doesn't bite me but can anybody give me a foolproof way to stop him biting her.
    Obviously it has to be her who is dealing with him so that she has some control and feels better. I noticed on an earlier thread that someone suggested
    a water spray. I don't know if this is a good idea with a small puppy. Any ideas would be appreciated as my daughter wont go near Louis unless he is asleep.
    PS. I managed to get a picture in my album but not sure how to link it to my posts, probably something easy but I have puppy brain at the moment
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

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    Just realised I did.

  3. #3
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    You could try keeping him on the lead and pulling him back if he goes to bite? You can just let him walk around with it dragging behind him. Some people cut an old lead and just leave a bit, which prevents the dog stepping in it, but you can still grab them way faster than when you gave to try grab their collars. Especially with a dog that low to the ground.

    The key is to do this all very calmly because otherwise it just all seems like a game to be excited about to the pup.

    So watch him go up to your daughter, a soon as he opens his mouth nip, pull him away from her without saying anything or looking directly at him, wait till he stops struggling and preferably till he sits, then let go off the lead. Rinse and repeat.

    Not sure how old your daughter is but I don't think it's totally necessary to let her deal with this herself.
    Last edited by Beloz; 07-23-2014 at 07:45 PM.

  4. #4

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    Sorry she is 12 so not little but not fully confident yet. Maybe scared is the wrong word more hesitant and unwilling to be involved in case she gets bitten. Last dog we had was 4 when she was born and lived to an old dog of 16. She was not prepared for the puppy stage at all, but then who is?

  5. #5
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    I think - with my dog a leather welding glove would have been nice.

    I'd grab her tongue until she noticed that biting me wasn't fun any more - count 1 (for a puppy) and let go.

    Or I'd actually push very slowly and gently - my bitten bit towards the back of her throat.

    If she grabbed something else I didn't want her to have, I'd try the bait and switch (here's something better, but beware of training naughty gets the good stuff), or just gently push her lip onto her tooth until it was no fun.

    Also play lots of "its yer choice" and "geddit and give" trades ie here's a toy - geddit, here's another toy - give the first toy to geddit the second toy... or treat... until you've got puppy grabbing the toy when you say geddit and spitting out when you say give... then you don't need to push lip over teeth any more.

    If you haven't got a treat or toy to swap with and the dog does actually give when you ask - then heaps of praise and nice calming rear rubs and butt massage etc. Not too exciting or the puppy will latch on again.

  6. #6
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    We finally cured Maggie with a sharp growl a sound that startled her. My husband did it best as he could get it a bit scary. They do want to please you so it is a matter of getting them to understand that the behaviour is unacceptable and unsociable. Maggie hated being put out of the room we were in so separating her as long as it was done instantly worked in there too somewhere.
    I think it is also that when we decide absolutely a particular behaviour is unacceptable we as the trainer give clear messages. With biting it is a bit cute when they are tiny and people may laugh and pull away a bit which is an exciting game from a puppy perspective. In the litter disipline is quick and clear and a growl is used.

  7. #7
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    I think the way that litter mates deal with it is bum in face and refusing to engage or play until the other puppy apologises and is more gentle... I see that at the beach a lot. Not so much the growl and chase away - tho that happens with dogs that want to be left alone ie the mother of the litter will do that... but puppies want to play - but not too rough... and how they tell the other puppy is to sort of freeze up and turn away... if the bully puppy keeps biting hard - the other puppy might decide they don't want to play at all and will do the growl and chase off...

    I also found with puppies that they match how gentle or rough you are with them. So if you're too rough they will bite more... they don't know you haven't got leather skin...

  8. #8
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    It sounds like it might already have escalated..if the right thing is done early, you can use ignore, but if the biting has become rewarding to the puppy, by possibly your daughter reacting, puppy thinks it is play and it is bullying your daughter as a strong puppy would in a litter, that is too late....in the early phase, going very quite and still and turning away, even covering eyes works well on puppies, even a very loud sharp noise at first, but once it finds the biting fun, you may have to use a bit of aversion training and that means make it not fun.....if done quick and instant, anything that stops the puppy is fine, be it grab the mouth, quick tap on the nose, rough noise, rough push away. But it must be done instant..no dwell....now. Kids often are fun to bite, because they run, squeal, arms moving, all looks alike play. i would teach your daughter to teach the puppy some basic obedience, such as sit and drop and stay . And to be firm with the little puppy, no treat unless our on the floor and such. This will teach her control and the puppy leadership....Mind you if your daughter is not interested, it will be up to you to take control of the lead and teach the puppy it is not allowed.....
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
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    Get your daughter to do obedience work with the pup. Food in a closed hand to encourage the pup to lick and her command the dog. I've helped a lot of children like this and the dog learns to be obedient for the child at the same time. I'll email you some videos how to do the actions when I get home tonight for you.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  10. #10
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    A trainer once recommended this exercise for my daughter to do with our dog when she was only about 4.

    Let your daughter feed the pup his dinner, but let her just hold the bowl up, without interacting (so no eye contact) with the pup, until the pup sits. Then let her bend down to put the bowl on the floor, but if the pup breaks his sit before the bowl is on the floor, she just picks it up again and starts again. It was easy with my dog back then, but will probably take lots of patience from your daughter with a young pup. It's a great exercise though because there's no pressure on the child to be commanding or anything like that. And it will boost her confidence is she can make the dog do what she wants without having to say a word or touch him. And teach her that persistence really is all it takes to train a dog.

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