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Thread: Destrcutive Puppy need help!!

  1. #1

    Default Destrcutive Puppy need help!!

    Hi Everyone,

    We have a English Staffy that we think is crossed with either boxer or kelpie, he is so destructive and energetic.
    He is he is nearly 7 months old he gets into our gardens and destroys them he eats all the leaves branches and has chewed and destroyed our irrigation system and our herb garden, he jumps and tears all the washing off the line, if anyone has any suggestions please let me know.

    We have had him desexed to try and settle him down but that hasn't worked we take him for walks in the morning and we play with him every night to try and tire him out.

    If he doesn't settle down we may need to give him away we don't want to because he is so loving & beautiful but just so destructive!!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    That sounds quite typical of a rather bored pup of that sort of mix. A walk in the morning and a play in the evening is probably not going to be enough for a dog like this. He will need lots of training to exercise his brain, be involved in family life and long enough walks that exercise his brain as well as his body. Kelpies are devilishly clever.

    I am guessing he's an outside only dog? That seriously reduces the opportunities for stimulating his brain. You may think you spend plenty of time with him, but how much more time would he be spending interacting with you if he were allowed inside? It aids bonding, speeds up the time it takes to teach the dog basic manners and allows you to prevent him getting up to mischief which is half of the battle.

    So my suggestions would be to allow him to be an inside dog (with the staffy genes you'll have to hide your shoes), give him lots of things he is allowed to chew on (raw bones outside, rawhide bones or cow hooves inside), give him interactive toys like a kong and a treat ball and similar for when you're out, and enroll in some training classes. He may well be a good candidate to do agility or flyball or similar.

    The clever ones are never the easiest ones. But they are easy to train if you get your head round what you want to achieve and which methods to use. Go and have a look at Kikopup's videos for some examples of training exercises.

    If you don't want to commit to a rigorous training regime, it may be best to try rehome him while he's still young. But it won't be easy if he doesn't have basic manners.

    Good luck.

    PS: Just wanted to add that they are always at their worst at that age. He's hit puberty! He should calm down a tad in a year or so. But obviously, you cannot wait that long to try solve the issues that are currently driving you bonkers.
    Last edited by Beloz; 04-14-2014 at 02:40 PM.

  3. #3
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    positive reinforcement, reward him for being good..... short sharp time outs........ hes a pup, of course he will be a bit of a handful..... I have a pure staffy, and he wont chew anything he isn't meant to now....

    would you rehome your child if it kept shitting himself?
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    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  4. #4
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    I forgot to mention that it is vital that you teach your dog to chill. I foster pups and the first thing I start doing after they arrive is to toss treats at them when I catch them lying down calmly. But again, it works much better if the dog spends lots of time with you inside.

    For teaching to be calm, I can highly recommend the book "Chill out Fido!". It has lots of detailed exercises and offers a very good insight into dogs' needs and the principles of positive reinforcement training.

  5. #5
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    Geelong, Vic
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    desexing wont settle down a bored dog. At most he gets a couple of hours of something you can call structured. For his breed this is too little. You need firm, structured exercises, make interactive toys like toys hanging on a bungee cord (or an old inner tube which springs which is great) and get yourself some Crib Stop in a can, and a paintbrush.

    He is showing you what level of activity and stimulation he needs, you need to match it. Leerburg Dog Training | 17,500 pages of dog training information, 750 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis has some good articles on managing high energy dogs and videos of structured exercises you can do with him as a start.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

  6. #6
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    He sounds absolutely normal for a 7 month old adolescent dog.

    You need to do what you can to limit his access to things like washing on line when you can't stop him from pulling it all off.

    The first few times my dog and the washing were out together - she looked at them like that might be fun and I looked at her like "no it wouldn't" and she never tried it.

    I didn't have much irrigation system in the back yard but for some reason - she never tried those either. I had lots of bits of wood, and stuffed kongs and old shoes for her to chew instead... and we sacrificed quite a few op shop toys for under 3yos to the 5 minutes of destuffing joy... And I'd put the stuffing back in an old sock and let her destuff that.

    You do need to be very clear about what are his toys and what are your toys (eg your good sox and shoes) and you need to keep all your stuff out of reach.

    And you need walks before you go out every morning and I'd try for 5 to 15 minutes of trick training too. Trick training - wears a dog's brain out. It might also be a good idea to have a dedicated bit of the garden for her to dig in, a shell pool with sand or dirt or something like that. And play with him in the back yard with his stuff so he gets the idea about what is his.

    And if all else fails - for a while you might need to fence off the bits of garden you don't want the dog in.

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