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Thread: our adolescent dog will NOT stop jumping/and humping on our young grandchildren

  1. #1

    Angry our adolescent dog will NOT stop jumping/and humping on our young grandchildren

    Has anyone any clues on how to handle this? Our lovely calm dog is no more, we have family staying with us and it is a nightmare. Roley will just not leave the kids alone and consequently he is in trouble and being thrown outside. Obviously this is not what we want but until the dog is sterilised we are at a complete loss of what to do.
    Thanks in advance for any help it will be much appreciated.
    Cheers

  2. #2

    Default

    Sterilisation won't necessarily change his behaviour but training will.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
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    871

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    You need to keep him on lead and keep his focus. humping and jumping are not sexual, they are from over excitement and even desexed he will do the same. Your pup should not be allowed free reign at his age as he wil just get up to mischief! Take this as a fabulous training opportunity with people in the house to get his attention and cement good behaviors.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    How old are the kids? Are they old enough to help with some training exercises?

    Just putting the dog outside won't really teach him anything. Time out might though. But the trick I found is that it should be short (I found 30-60 secs worked well) so they don't get distracted from what's going on and you need to then give the dog a chance to succeed when you let them back in. So he tries to jump, you grab him immediately (leaving a lead attached to his collar helps a lot), put him in the time out spot for a bit (I prefer laundry or similar, somewhere really boring), let him out and praise and/or reward him at the slightest sign that he is choosing to stay calm when near the kids. Otherwise, repeat. Be consistent, even if at first it takes 10 or more goes to see any effect at all. And try to stay very calm. Yelling or yanking usually just encourages an overexcited dog. I personally found that if the person the dog tries to jump on enters the room the dog is in and then walks out as soon as the dog behaves badly works faster, hence the question about the age of the kids. It's the same principle though.

    Another good thing to do with restless dogs is to reward LOTS for calm behaviour in any situation. And I mean give really yummy treats when the dog is simply lying down somewhere minding his own business. Lots of people don't think of doing this and only praise and reward for actions, but it really does make a difference. Just be careful that you don't create a beggar. I usually only treat if the dog is not looking at me at all. You might decrease the interval at which you give the treats when it is harder for the dog to choose to lie down and relax, like when there are visitors or you're preparing food. But the element of surprise and unpredictability only makes them keener, so there doesn't have to be a rule for this.

  5. #5

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    Thanks to you all with your advice. Some of it is really helpful

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    I have to add that I use the spray bottle to deter my dog from jumping on occasional visitors. Mainly because these short visits don't allow enough time for training. My dog is over 3 now but still gets very excited when meeting other people. Partly genetic and possibly partly due to a lack of proper socialization as a pup. Either way we've accepted that it is hard for her to control it and the spray bottle just reminds her it won't get tolerated.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Hi Northolt

    Some good advice already - you have a house full of excellent training opportunities in the form of distractions...

    So make sure you have control - eg the lead and collar - and start at a distance if you can ie guests inside on lounge, dog cannot enter room until he can hold a good sit and not get up until you give permission, and only greet guests on loose lead. As soon as he lunges to the end of the lead (keep it short to start with), prevent him from approaching further and drag him away until he's paying attention to you again then repeat.

    Try five to ten times and then put him where he can't cause any trouble.

    Praise him for paying attention to you.

    Practice before his dinner time and if he makes any significant improvement - no more repeats - just straight to the dinner routine. Probaby works best if you put the dinner down and walk him past it to where your guests are.

    To start with - have your guests be as boring as possible - no eye contact or talking to the dog.

    Gradually increase the difficulty by one change at a time. Eg
    start with distance.
    if he can get all the way to a polite greeting on a loose lead then add some excitement from the guests (one thing at a time) - at a bigger distance.

    If he totally loses it - you've asked too much in one go - and end the session and start again with less intensity or more distance.

    It's ok to end on a fail - set a timer or count your attempts - no more than 30 seconds or five attempts to start with and no more than 3 to 5 minutes when he starts getting good at it.

    If he gets really good at greeting - start adding some drop-stays in the room.

    I have a crate I can close in the corner of my lounge room - and my dog can go in there if she's quiet and if she's noisy she goes into another room (or even the car when it's winter - never gets too cold here).

    PS - you could add some food rewards or what ever his favourite thing is - but I find my dog will act naughty in order to get the reward so when I'm training to calm her down - I tend to use praise and pats instead.

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