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Thread: New puppy labrador - to buy or not to buy??

  1. #1

    Default New puppy labrador - to buy or not to buy??

    Hi all,
    My wife really wants a chocolate lab.
    I have had a lab in the past, and every one that I have ever known has had shocking hip and knee problems, costing thousands in vet and surgery bills.
    My question is, if we were to buy from a breeder with parents with great hip/knee scores, how much does that guarantee we have no issues with the pup? Is it still just chance?
    Thanks all

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    You need to find a breeder that also has records for the grandparents and even further back if possible. The more generational information you have the better your chances are. Yes it is not 100% guaranteed that it wont happen and there is still a chance but the more good scores there are in a line the better your chances are. Just having information about the parents is probably not good enough for a high risk breed like a lab is what I would be thinking. If possible find out about the reputation of the breeder and if the puppies have a good reputation for being sound from the breeding lines.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-17-2013 at 03:03 PM.

  3. #3
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    Keep the dog thin, don't put it on rubbish diets and exercise properly so the dogs not growing up like a roly pudding. The body grows in response to exercise, find a breeder that has consistent reports of good pups and has had the lines for a while so you can investigate a few generations.

  4. #4
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    Adelaide
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    I know a breeder of chocolate labs whose partner is a vet. They're in SA though.

    So I'm guessing - good after sales support there if things do go wrong.

    It can take up to a year to get quality puppies from a caring responsible breeder who does get all the practical health testing (DNA and etc) to select a mate for their bitch and for the bitch to come in season, get pregnant, gestate, have puppies, puppies need to be 8 weeks or older before going to their new homes...

    In that time - you can find the Labrador club in your state, go to some of their social days and talk to people about their dogs.

    As Nekhbet and others said - you can avoid a lot of problems if you keep the dog lean and fit (but don't over exercise it as a puppy - 5 mins per month of age is enough and then they should rest/sleep for a bit - whether they want to or not). You also want to stop the puppy from jumping on and off stuff until its bones are strong - my brother's Staffordshire bull terrier broke a leg jumping off something at 6 months old. Living in a crate for few months was not fun for that dog.

    The other thing that may help - is starting and keeping insurance for the puppy... For big dogs - I think that's a great idea.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Yes taking out some insurance in the first year is quite a good thought. I did this with a pup and at 9 months old she was diagnosed with elbow dysplasia and needed surgery and the insurance paid for most of it plus all the scans. Just make sure the insurance covers these conditions.

    Keeping a dog lean is important as is keeping an eye on how you exercise them. Although I did all these things and my dogs are all grown out very lean, my pup still was diagnosed with ED, unfortunately it was found ultimately to be in this particular line of dogs.

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