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Thread: Newbie here,looking for a chat.

  1. #11
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    I really think it is still too early to do this with distractions. Going too fast can very easily set you back. It takes time to condition her brain. You don't want her to have to think about what to do with this one. You want her reaction to become automatic. So you need lots more repetitions until she could do it in her sleep, so to speak, before you make it even the slightest bit harder. I think I didn't call my dog when she was even the slightest bit distracted for a few weeks after we started and we practiced this lots and lots of times every day. I really think that is why her recall is so reliable now. I never, ever pushed her or made it too challenging in those first few months.

  2. #12
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    Absolutely i understand that i don't want it in any way to be confronting for her.
    I do appreciate your help.

  3. #13
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    I invest a lot of time in recall training with my dogs because I love walking them off leash wherever I can and take them with me when I go places. You have to expect it to take a few months at least to be able to get a reliable recall in most situations. And that is with lots of repetitions every day. But if you regard it as a fun game to play with your pup and not put any pressure on her or on yourself, it will barely feel like training at all and it will pay off big time.

  4. #14
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    Sounds like you're doing everything right to me
    Considering she is a Cattle dog (highly inelegant) It wouldn't surprise me if she starts to really enjoy training time with you My Australian Shepherd loves learning new things with me.

  5. #15
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    Bones

    Puppies are like sponges when it comes to learning stuff. If you don't train a cattle dog, she will train you.

    But she is a puppy with the attention span of a gnat.

    So keep your training sessions really short... eg 5 tries, play, 5 more tries, potty stop, do something else.

    Games for puppies...

    Toilet training - use a word when you take her out, act boring, when she goes - praise
    collar grab
    its yer choice
    play with the toy I want
    resource guarding - trade your chicken neck for my up market chicken neck dipped in salmon oil...
    in yer bed, in the other bed...
    sit
    drop
    stand
    speak
    shake hands
    chase the ball/toy
    (then fetch the ball/toy)
    roll over
    spin left, twist right
    go round the milk crate/box
    hide and seek (you make a ball on the floor out of yourself and your puppy has to find you)
    find the treat (under the facewasher)
    tug and give/geddit
    loose lead walking / reinforcement zone (search youtube for "side" and "close" and "reinforcement zone")
    crate training - fun things happen in the crate.
    drinking out of a sport bottle.
    chase the hose water (erm this is how I exercised my dog during heat waves)
    recall and this way. (call once. If puppy doesn't come go get puppy - now collar grab comes in handy, if puppy not likely to come - avoid calling).

    All these things to be done in tiny tiny sessions.

    You're also training no biting the boss, waiting for dinner, how to be quiet (less barking), jumping with permission only, etc etc. Most of the bad behaviours - try to prevent or think of something that you would like that they can't do at the same time as the bad behaviour ie hard to jump if you're trying to hold a sit.

  6. #16
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    Thats a long list there Hyacinth's but thank you.
    she does jump up when she is excited, is there a certain way to train her to avoid that? I have young cousins.

    My method of thinking at this stage is hit on the head the most important stuff.Stuff that without , may lead to a misbehaved dog.
    Like come when called,sit, no biting , lead and so forth. I hope it is the right way about things.But i think if you have the fundamentals you gain
    respect from your dog. Tricks can come later.

    She is a puppy, so puppy behavior is aloud. At first i didn't believe that. i am now understanding that i have a good smart/ loyal dog at only 13 weeks.
    Cant complain with that.

    Do you most of you guys take your pups to a training/obedience school? or do you prefer to teach yourself.
    Always been curious whether it is worth the investment. We never did for our other cattle dog,she is a good dog.

    Thanks again.

  7. #17
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    One technique I learnt more about today is to walk into your dog when they attempt to jump and force them to back up. Might work with a pup. Wouldn't have worked really with my dog when I got her without risking injury...

  8. #18
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    With dogs that jump up I have always stepped into them so that my knee comes into contact with their chest, or at least unbalances them. I will only give the attention they are seeking when they are calm (and usually in a sit), otherwise I ignore. I've found even friends dogs who have no training or manners whatsoever usually get that one pretty quickly if they want a pat from the visitor. If you are consistent and not give her what she wants when she jumps up I think she'll get the message pretty quickly.

    I generally tend to train my dogs myself, and like you I'm more interested in good manners, recall etc than tricks, so we don't get super complicated. I have done obedience classes before and found them great too. They can be a really good way to learn yourself, and a good way for pup to learn with distractions, as well as socialising and learning acceptable behaviours around other dogs and people. I think plenty of people on here do both

  9. #19
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    I used to train a dog not to jump on me by kneeing it in the chest as it jumped. If I turned it a full somersault - I thought that was good. But I know a lot more about dog training now than I did five years ago.

    So what I'd do now with a tiny puppy - I'd spend a lot of time pairing a collar grab ie I reach out and grab the dog's collar with my hand, and shove a treat in the puppies mouth with the other hand. Try to get five grabs a day in for a week and then a little bit more randomly. Every time I do a session of this with my 5yo dog, catching her gets a little bit easier.

    So then when she jumps up... (or on the fence or at someone or the door and etc) I grab her collar and hold so she can't be jumping at the same time. With my dog - I can also ask for a sit stay or drop stay - which she enjoys because I've paired that many times with what she has to do for dinner. With a tiny puppy you might only get 1 second of stay before you must release but you can work on that. Mostly it's about prevention, which is where the collar grab comes in handy.

    And once puppy has a strong understanding of a sit, you can ask her to be sit, and reward calm behaviour by allowing a greeting. Not so calm behaviour - increase the distance between you and the distraction (cousins), until you can get calm and then reward that. Give the dog permission to play and then let it go jump all over the cousins if you want but make sure it's on your terms and after showing some calm for even short bits of time.

    I did puppy preschool at the vet, and then puppy school at my local obedience club and then through the grades until I got to Agility and then I found out about Susan Garrett and her training methods and a lot of other reward based trainers. The joy their dogs show in work is what I want for my dog.

    My dog showed me that yanking her by the neck, yelling at her, saying "firm no", taps on the nose, rolled up newspaper, and worst of all - the choke chain collar - were steps backwards in her training. She never had a clue what she was doing wrong, just that I was unhappy with her. Or that the activity we were trying to do was no fun.

    So we use more reward based methods - you do what I want - you get something you want, otherwise - you get to try again (no reward). And also use prevention. And if she's doing something I don't want, I stop doing the thing she wants, or I stop her from doing the thing I don't want and ask her to do something else that she can't do at the same time as the unwanted behaviour.

    Eg driving to the park - dog starts barking - pull over the car and wait for dog to stop barking. If dog doesn't stop barking, drive somewhere else (start back home, if dog shuts up, drive to a different park). Once my dog got over being car sick - she started getting excited when we got near somewhere "fun", and then she started barking. I only had to pull over two times before she understood that barking did not get her closer to what she wanted. She doesn't always understand so quickly but lessons like that stick with her.

  10. #20
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    Thanks mate, there some great advice there. I think i will keep coming back to this post for tips.

    So the collar grab is teaching her, when i have her by the collar not to pull or jump/try to get away?

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