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Thread: Roley the chewing monster

  1. #1

    Default Roley the chewing monster

    I brought my new 8 week old labradoodle home on Saturday. He's an absolute delight, I'm only getting up once in the night to take Roley out for toileting and last night we had a break through in that he didn't cry when it was bedtime. Wooppeee! However yesterday afternoon he started going for my feet and the bottom of my pants. I've been redirecting him to his chew toys constantly. The main problem is when I take him out for toileting his only interest is to grab onto my pants and wrestle with them. I've tried pulling my pants legs up and now he bites my skin. Obviously he doesn't hurt yet but I need to break this habit asap as I have grandsons that visit regularly.
    Need advice
    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Oh you have to love puppyhood and those razor sharp teeth they have!

    I would keep redirecting him to toys he is able to chew on and you can try yelling out "Ow" when he does it to you? I think that is suppose to work!

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    Oh you have to love puppyhood and those razor sharp teeth they have!

    I would keep redirecting him to toys he is able to chew on and you can try yelling out "Ow" when he does it to you? I think that is suppose to work!
    Thanks Jadielee87. I've just had him vet checked and she said the same thing. So I will just have to persevere with the re-directing.

  4. #4
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    I yelp and move away. But obviously that won't work when you take him out for a wee. Unless you can tie his lead to something.

    I watch how my dog deals with our 12 week old foster pup when he gets the crazies and loses control over his piranha teeth. She has to get pretty scary before he stops. It is highly effective but it would be pretty hard to translate that into something a human can safely do. So ignoring and withdrawing attention is your best bet.
    Last edited by Beloz; 09-17-2013 at 02:38 PM.

  5. #5
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    Give him a loud 'AHHH' in a grumbly voice and a quick scruffing. If he comes back at you repeat the AHH and leave him outside for a while. Redirecting to a toy does not teach him to leave you alone, a punishment will.

    We put security/working puppies onto toys instead of people when they're little with redirection. It doesn't teach them biting people is unacceptable, it just means not right now or potentially a reward in showing interest in that kind of thing. So for the average pet dog you want to teach never to lay a tooth on a human, a short correction instantly to show them it's unacceptable is the only way to go.

  6. #6
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    Depending how fragile your skin is, I'd consider investing in a pair of rigging gloves to wear when handling.

    What I do with my current dog when she nips is kind of freeze up, look away and then very slowly push the bit of me that's in her mouth - further down her throat until she tries to spit me out. Hold there for a second (or three) and then let her spit me out, and withhold play and attention for 10 to 30 seconds.

    I found yelling, and nose taps, and scruffing (apart from a collar grab and hold) generally did not slow her chomping enthusiasm at all.

    I also find it helps to have plenty of things around it's ok for her to chew up and destroy. When she was small - a rawhide bone lasted a few days. Now I'm lucky if I get 20 minutes out of the biggest one - and it haunts us unpleasantly at the other end so she doesn't get those any more. Cows hooves are great. They last around a month. I have a friend who likes deer antler but I think they're a little bit hard - if you get something that's too hard - the dog can break their teeth on it.

    Roo jerky might be good. As long as it's just the dried muscle and no bones. No smoked roo tail or pigs trotters - those things can splinter and make your vet rich.

    I used a lot of ginormous rope toys too, and something called a squirrel dude. And the black kongs (because they are harder to destroy than the other ones). I think my dog skipped "puppy" toys.

    It's important the puppy has things that it is permitted to chew and you prevent as much as possible chewing anything else. It's good if you have a selection of chewies - to only put a few out per day (or week) and then change them over for some other toys, each week (or day).

    And I have been known to get the occasional stuffed toy from an op shop, the sort that's suitable for under threes... there's about five to ten minutes of extreme joy for my dog - gutting one of those. But again, you have to be really clear on what's her toy and what's your toys. Well they're all your toys but she has permission to destroy the ones you give her specifically. And not anything else. Eg your couch cushions.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    Give him a loud 'AHHH' in a grumbly voice and a quick scruffing. If he comes back at you repeat the AHH and leave him outside for a while. Redirecting to a toy does not teach him to leave you alone, a punishment will.

    We put security/working puppies onto toys instead of people when they're little with redirection. It doesn't teach them biting people is unacceptable, it just means not right now or potentially a reward in showing interest in that kind of thing. So for the average pet dog you want to teach never to lay a tooth on a human, a short correction instantly to show them it's unacceptable is the only way to go.
    Thanks for that Nekhbet. Just read in my local paper the very same question I asked and the reply was to wear old pants and sneakers and put "deep heat" (or similar) on them. It should make the dog turn away. No idea if that works though

  8. #8
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    I must say, with our 12 week old foster pup, I find I intuitively use a fair bit of positive punishment. I do grab him firmly by the scruff of the neck when he tries to bite the cat for example. Consistently. And of course I pair this with lavish praise and rewards if he sits calmly or looks at me when the cat wanders past. But I find sometimes you just need to find a way to quickly stop an unwanted behaviour in order to create an opportunity to reward good behaviour.

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