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Thread: Help me choose - pleeeaaase!

  1. #31
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    Aug 2011
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    Yeah, you're right. Pushed in faces are not a good idea for tropical climates. I just had a bit of a read and the recommendation for those climates seems to pretty much be lean frame, longer nose and not too much hair. So it may be better to investigate your 'running dog' options.

    Or a giant Schnauzer? Probably totally not your type, but I've met a couple and thought they seemed like fun dogs. But they also have the reputation of being quite stubborn, I believe.

    Rhodesian Ridgeback? They're pretty laid-back dogs, quite big but not massive, very short coat, long noses... Originallly bred to hunt lions in Africa, so well suited to warm climates, I would think. They don't require heaps of excercise and I think they're fairly easy to train. Kind of middle of the range as far as intelligence goes. (I had a ridgeback x staghound and have known a few other ridgback crosses and one purebred one)

    But seriously, read up on training first. It seems an overwhelming task until you get your head round the basic principles and then it becomes much less daunting. But it is the one thing that usually decides whether someone keeps a dog forever or not.
    Last edited by Beloz; 09-13-2013 at 09:42 AM.

  2. #32

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    Yeah it's all looking more and more like the dog I end up with will be in the direction of 'running dogs' or a mixed breed. Something about them peaks my interest. I keep being told though that a staghound isn't a breed. I suppose that's like saying a Bull Arab isn't a breed (which it's not - apparently - its a mix). Either way, these guys have some pretty brilliant dogs https://www.facebook.com/groups/32571649695/?fref=ts Shame the majority of them are in Vic. Too far and too soon for me to get a pup :/

  3. #33
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    I currently have an 11 week old staghound x foster pup at home. They are reasonably common in rescue, so if that's what you've set your mind on, the right one will come along eventually after you start looking.

    You must be prepared to put extra effort into recall with such dogs though. Recall is always a very long and intensive process. But these dogs are born to chase and their instinct will take over if there's any wildlife around. Or worse, small fluffy white dogs. First time I left my staghound x off leash (way too early - I really didn't have a clue back then), she charged after a fluffy white dog and they both disappeared out of sight in minutes. She ended up being good with small dogs when she got older, but I could never trust her around kangaroos and she actually managed to catch a few.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I currently have an 11 week old staghound x foster pup at home. They are reasonably common in rescue, so if that's what you've set your mind on, the right one will come along eventually after you start looking.

    You must be prepared to put extra effort into recall with such dogs though. Recall is always a very long and intensive process. But these dogs are born to chase and their instinct will take over if there's any wildlife around. Or worse, small fluffy white dogs. First time I left my staghound x off leash (way too early - I really didn't have a clue back then), she charged after a fluffy white dog and they both disappeared out of sight in minutes. She ended up being good with small dogs when she got older, but I could never trust her around kangaroos and she actually managed to catch a few.
    Oh definitely! I've read many an article about sighthounds and their difficulty with recall. The Staghound x Dane I looked after and owned for a few years I was able to let off leash. She wasn't a chaser of small fluffy things, but her recall lacked when she got the scent of something on our walks. I was able to tie her up outside the local grocery store while I made a quick dash inside and she quietly sat outside, laid down, and waited for me. The best dog I think, ever. Docile, kind hearted, obedient and eager to please, great with kids, patient and always extremely happy to see you. And boy could she jump! My partner has a Landcruiser ute and at the time had a decent sized dog cage on the back that was able to accommodate her size. Well! She was able to jump OVER the cage into the back of the ute WHILST it was on the ute! True beauty! She was great. And she would never jump the fence of the home she lived in. I dream to be able to get another dog like her

    Wow, caught kangaroos? Holy moly

  5. #35
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    Jan 2012
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    Geelong, Vic
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    bull terriers are not always easy at all, they are stubborn and need good training and socialisation.

    What about a rescue greyhound if you like the leggy breeds? Pre trained and tested plus there's oodles off them around to choose from.

  6. #36
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    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I keep meaning to buy this book

    When Pigs Fly - training success with impossible dogs

    the website is a flash PITA to browse but I like the book. My friend who has the best behaved BT I've ever met (except when she's competing obedience), used this book like a bible.

    When Pigs Fly book blurb
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-13-2013 at 08:37 PM.

  7. #37
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    Feb 2013
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    Hunter Valley NSW
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    Everyone has to start with a breed somewhere, but if you do go ahead and choose a Bull Terrier, it is very important that you have lots of support around you from those who know the breed - your breeder should always be there for good advice (not the "hit them on the nose with a newspaper" advice) and your obedience trainer should also be carefully selected to ensure they are experienced with Bullies. Nekhbet is right, they can be very stubborn and manipulative, and get the better of you very easily.

    Bullies are great with people and make a fantastic companion. Exercise levels vary from dog to dog but generally they don't need a lot of exercise and actually hate going out in the rain!

    They come in a miniature version if the standard size is too large for you.

    There are a lot of them in rescue also, if you like, you could try fostering a dog and try and get a feel for the breed that way?

    My other concern is the limited budget you have to purchase a puppy. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but that does not sound like a lot to spend on a good-quality pup?

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by chevbrock View Post
    Everyone has to start with a breed somewhere, but if you do go ahead and choose a Bull Terrier, it is very important that you have lots of support around you from those who know the breed - your breeder should always be there for good advice (not the "hit them on the nose with a newspaper" advice) and your obedience trainer should also be carefully selected to ensure they are experienced with Bullies. Nekhbet is right, they can be very stubborn and manipulative, and get the better of you very easily.

    Bullies are great with people and make a fantastic companion. Exercise levels vary from dog to dog but generally they don't need a lot of exercise and actually hate going out in the rain!

    They come in a miniature version if the standard size is too large for you.

    There are a lot of them in rescue also, if you like, you could try fostering a dog and try and get a feel for the breed that way?

    My other concern is the limited budget you have to purchase a puppy. Forgive me if I'm wrong, but that does not sound like a lot to spend on a good-quality pup?

    Yeah, I'm just getting ideas and the best course of action at the moment. There is no way I could get a purebred as I am now, I've only got a casual job, 3 days a week, live on my own, pay rent, electricity, and have a car to pay off too. I just want to have a dog set in my mind for when I do eventually get a full time/part time job and a house with a yard that takes pets. If I were to get a dog now, I'd probably be crazy after the last two I had. It isn't fair raising a pup in such a small space and the destruction of a courtyard that I don't own really throws me off. A dog needs a yard that is accepting of a growing pup. Yes, I will lose time if I get a full time job, but I need the full time job to afford and raise a purebred pup, hence why getting a mixed breed is looking more the option at this stage and probably the next few years (unless I win the lotto! Ha!). Hopefully everything turns out well and I'll be posting on here again with my puppy in my arms

  9. #39
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    Aug 2011
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    Hi wkristen,

    What about these guys ?? My wife is always feeling unsafe when i'm away (god knows why we live in the safest place ive ever lived) but with one of these guys snooring beside the bed she feels very safe....(even though he probably wouldnt hear a break in over his own snooring LOL)...



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