Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39

Thread: Help me choose - pleeeaaase!

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    lol Bernie. Frenchies are tiny. And utterly adorable with lots of attitude. I am tempted to get one one day.

    No idea if there are specific breeds more suitable to that kind of weather. But if a Staffy can cope with it, I'm sure a Frenchie could too? And if you cannot afford one from a breeder, Nekhbet mentions that there are some available through rescue? Have a look here: PetRescue - Inspired by unconditional love - PetRescue I couldn't actually find any in QLD, but they do have lots of VERY cute Jack Russel and Fox terrier cross pups listed. Smaller than what you might have been looking for but they have lots of attitude and are always up for an adventure.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I love whippets but most of the ones I meet seem to fall in one of two categories: extremely timid or downright fearful or completely bonkers and unable to stand still for even a second. I've never met one inside his home though.

    .
    That is interesting, we have had quite a lot of whippets over the years with none of those characteristics. They have for the most part been laid back and social and rather couch potatorish and although they enjoy a good walk, my working dogs can run them into the ground very quickly.

    I generally prefer bitches in my breeds but we have found that the male whippets have actually made better pets and tend to be more outgoing and open. I think like anything you have to be very selective when choosing breeders and take a good look at the breeding stock. When I chose our last whippets when I arrived at the kennels the breeder wasnt there and the whippets were all laid out on this huge king size bed in a large run. They came over to say hello and then went back to snoozing on the bed untill the breeder turned up. The dogs we got from there have had great temperaments just right for a family with 2 young children and cats at the time.

    I do have had a friend with a timid female whippet. Nothing major but more timid that I would like.

    There are good dogs in rescue, you just have to find a rescue who are realistic in their assessment of the dogs and are only interested in finding the right match. The rescue I have got a couple of my dogs from have been totally forthright in their assessment for which they use a good professional trainer. She is always on the money and tells it like it is. They also offer and encourage and supply follow up help with training.

    Another dog that I have been impressed with is the Rhodesian ridgeback. I have have know quite a few friends with familys take on a ridgeback and they have fitted in beautifully. Gentle, active but not over the top and they love to be close to you. I babysat one and she had no concept of personal space LOL, but a very easy dog to care for and was very polite with my dogs even though she was a lot bigger.
    My friend got one from a breeder for free because it didnt have a proper ridge. What a gorgeous dog she turned out to be. I have only known bitches in this breed.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-12-2013 at 11:25 AM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I'm thinking something like a Tenterfield terrier (miniature fox terrier) might be a good choice. Terriers can be trained to be good with cats - especially if you get them young. Tenterfields are small, manageable, eager to please, short coats and look a tiny bit like pharaoh hounds.

    I don't know what kinds of dogs are good in FNQ. Sean has Mastiff.

    The whippets I know - are outgoing, enthusiastic, not good with cats, fast and playful. Italian Greyhounds I've met, however are small, anxious - especially around other dogs, and seem fragile.

    I guess I'd be looking around who has what dogs in FNQ and seeing how they do. My dog is not an outside dog in high summer here (40'C +) - not sure it gets quite that hot in FNQ. And we have all sorts of dogs in Adelaide. The ones I consider most inappropriate are the arctic thick coated ones like huskies but sometimes a thick coat can protect against the heat too.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Toowoomba, QLD
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    No matter what type of dog you get, remember that you will have to keep them for 18+ years regardless of how much they destroy, chew, dig, bark, ruin things, pull washing of the line, give you sad eyes etc. And you must be willing to give up certain things like travel, moving or living/working overseas if you can't find someone to care for your dog while you are gone.

    I also think that an older dog (3+ years) would suit you better, but in saying that, my two dogs are both 3yrs and they are still very destructive and energetic. I'm 100% behind rescue dogs and would never buy from a breeder but if you do, make sure that you buy from a registered, ethical, pedigree (not purebred) breeder who does all the required health and genetic testing. You will be looking at paying $800-$1000+ for one of these dogs, plus all your desexing costs on top (as opposed to a rescue for $100-$300 with everything done) and you will also have to put your name down and wait approximately 1 year for the litter to be planned, mated, weaned etc. so these are all things to take into consideration too.

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I'm thinking something like a Tenterfield terrier (miniature fox terrier) might be a good choice. Terriers can be trained to be good with cats - especially if you get them young. Tenterfields are small, manageable, eager to please, short coats and look a tiny bit like pharaoh hounds.

    I don't know what kinds of dogs are good in FNQ. Sean has Mastiff.

    The whippets I know - are outgoing, enthusiastic, not good with cats, fast and playful. Italian Greyhounds I've met, however are small, anxious - especially around other dogs, and seem fragile.

    I guess I'd be looking around who has what dogs in FNQ and seeing how they do. My dog is not an outside dog in high summer here (40'C +) - not sure it gets quite that hot in FNQ. And we have all sorts of dogs in Adelaide. The ones I consider most inappropriate are the arctic thick coated ones like huskies but sometimes a thick coat can protect against the heat too.
    My partners parents just adopted two Mastiff x Ridgeback x Dane pups. I find it truly amazing how different personalities can be in puppies born from the same litter. They are gorgeous dogs, stocky and healthy. One is constantly go-go-go and will follow you everywhere, jump on you, play with you and shower you with kisses but won't stay still in your arms, whereas his brother is much more independent and will be happy to sit on his own and watch the world go by, sometimes run up to you for a pat, and will let you hold him without struggling while he gives you kisses . What I find funny though is that when there's a new loud noise the puppies haven't been exposed to, the independent one will get closer and check it out, whereas his outgoing brother will run back to his kennel. Moving on, their parents do pretty well with the temperatures up here and are fairly relaxed.

    Not too keen on terrier breeds other than the Boston. I guess, to round up my preferences, I do have a liking towards solid, stocky dogs, but also to tall, large running breeds.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    There's so much variety in the terrier breeds. There are some I love and some I can't stand.

    Some of the ones I like are the bull terrier - the one with the roman nose - had these in the family and some friends have them and they're just gorgeous as far as I'm concerned. I also like border terriers, these were also the inspiration for the wookie noises in star wars and if you ever have any trouble with rats in the yard - they will sort it. And I like jack russells, not sure if i'd ever want to own one though, same with SBT. Manchester Terriers look nice but I don't think I've ever met one.

    I really wouldn't want a pup that is going to grow up huge to be jumping on me uninvited. And I'm not keen on being slobbered on either. But I guess they're puppies and the learning will come.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-12-2013 at 10:56 PM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
    Posts
    388

    Default

    Well for my 2 cents worth - have you considered a Bull Terrier? (completely agree with Hyacinth). My bully cross is the easiest dog ever. They like exercise but are also happy to lounge around. Not too big, not too small, short coat. Also has a slightly 'tougher' look that you were saying would make you feel safe while hubby is away. They're beautiful, patient family pets, and great with kids. I just love them

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dhru View Post
    Well for my 2 cents worth - have you considered a Bull Terrier? (completely agree with Hyacinth). My bully cross is the easiest dog ever. They like exercise but are also happy to lounge around. Not too big, not too small, short coat. Also has a slightly 'tougher' look that you were saying would make you feel safe while hubby is away. They're beautiful, patient family pets, and great with kids. I just love them
    Really?? I only ask because ALL that I have read about the breed is that they are one of the most stubborn breeds on the planet and will truly test you. Even a breeder up here has an article on their website for owners who are finding it hard to deal with their bull terriers and state to use a rolled up newspaper on their nose when need be. I have always loved the look of them and my partner wants one too, but after all the negative criticism of the breed it's turned me off. I guess I also have a fear of not being able to control one with all the 'stubborness' and such. I guess it's more so that they need a strong leader and I don't feel I have the confidence to do it - but that's as an adult - I suppose raising one from a pup I could do it.



    Loving all the feedback guys - thank you so much!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Don't be fooled by puppies apparent fragility and cuteness. Raising a dog from a pup will not automatically make being a leader to them easier. Puppies test your patience a lot and bad habits are easily enforced at that age. In some ways it is easier to train an older dog compared to a pup because they will get less easily distracted and usually calmer.

    I would never buy a pup from a breeder who recommends hitting a dog on the nose with a rolled up newspaper. That is like straight from the 1950s school of dog training. Sometimes - and this may be more so for some breeds than others, not sure - punishment can be useful in training, but often it is only necessary because there were mistakes made in using positive reinforcement methods in the earlier stages. My rescue dog for example used to jump up at people like a lunatic. The behaviour was so engrained and strong that I suspect it must have been enforced at some stage in her early development. I tried lots of different methods, starting with rewards for appropriate greetings, but they didn't happen often enough to be useful. And in the end what worked best was time-out and - even more effective - a quick spray in the face with a spray bottle if she attempts to jump up. But that is the only time I need to use negative methods.

    It might help you think about this a bit more clearly if you first do some reading on training a pup or older dog. There's lots of info and links to resources on this forum.

    And it could be possible that the bull terrier is not the best dog for an inexperienced owner. Hopefully someone here will be able to comment on that.

    What about a bulldog?

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    What about a bulldog?
    Yep, have had a look at them. Temperature problems came up too. Not sure how well it'd go, but it also depends on what my next place will be like. This one I'm in now retains heat in summer and remains warm in winter, the garage is always cooler, and the courtyard has shady spots. I'm hoping to get a larger yard space and a cooler living area, but it'll all depend on what's available and allows pets (very few). I've also looked at American Bulldogs and some 'Australian Bulldogs'. They might be better as their face isn't as pudgy as the English Bulldog and moving around won't be as big a problem as they have longer legs.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •