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Thread: Our eight-week-old female Siberian Husky puppy cries at night. Help!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Australia
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    Post Puppy Help!

    Hi all,
    My family and I just bought an 8 week old pure bred Siberian Husky and were after some tips for keeping her comfortable and happy at night time.
    We are attempting to crate train her, and have provided her with a small crate filled with a small soft bed and a couple of toys.
    We have just gotten through our 3rd night and she is still crying continuously of a night time. Does anyone have any tips? We are toileting her outside every 2-3 hours. I want to do my best to make sure she is 100% happy! If anyone has any hints or whatever. please let me know.

  2. #2
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    Default

    I've never had a tiny pup but I remember one regular member writing that they put the pup's bed next to their bed and pretty much slept with their hand on/near the pup. She's only a little baby and she misses her litter. Go easy on her and on yourself. Starting training early is really good, but just take very little steps right now and give her time to settle in. She'll probably get used to her new life and home with time. 3 nights is really very new.

    Some common methods of comforting pups at night are providing them with a hot water bottle or heat pack (or you can get cheap heated pet beds these days) and putting a ticking clock with them that is supposed to simulate their mum's heartbeat. No idea if the latter works at all - sounds a little bit like an old wives tale to me! But I think a bit of extra warmth would do no harm.

    Good luck! (And where oh where are the pics of this no doubt adorable pup?!)

  3. #3
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    Hi,
    Don't know if it's just a coincidence BUT the first night at home (according to Hubby) with our pup was bad! I stuck a ticking clock in the next night and he got better and each night for the next few night he improved to no crying after a couple of nights. So may be worth a go =)

  4. #4
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    Jul 2013
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    Australia
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    We have her crate set up in our TV room, but are thinking about just leaving the crate door open of a night time (the tv room doors will be closed) so that she has a little bit more space and doesn't feel so confined. We have also got her booked into classes in a few days, which I am hoping will help. I have noticed today that she often curls up next to my feet and falls asleep. When this happens I try to move her into her crate so that she begins to get used to sleeping in there. Has anyone else got any tips about things to do to tire her out a little more? She doesn't seem to be interested in her toys at the moment. I keep hearing about the clock idea, so I might give that a go. I am so terrified that our neighbours will complain to the council or something, so I really want to get this little girl comfortable. Will have to figure out how to use this forum and then I'll upload some photos

  5. #5
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    You could try leaving a radio playing just loud enough too....I started with the crate in our bedroom and slowly moved it out a little bit every night...before we knew it we had it down the hall and into another room. I'd also keep the crate door shut so puppy wont go peeing through the room during the night. Hide and seek used to wear out both my pup and myself LOL. Try not to cave into her whining...tough love is good love. (easy for me to say that though....no one likes hearing a crying puppy)
    Good luck....the little rascals can be just as much work as a human puppy.


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  6. #6
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    emmajordan91

    Do not leave the crate door open...

    we're talking a puppy just separated from the litter - so it's lonely and confused. If you leave the door open, it will make deposits all around the tv room, and maybe eat the remote. Pretty sure my dog would have shredded everything in the crate if left in the same predicament as yours, she got newspaper and old towels until she stopped shredding stuff.

    But she sleeps next to my bed. And has since the first night of heart rending shrieks and howls... from the laundry/kitchen.

    So I would start with puppy next to my bed until it is about four months old and able to hang on all night. I'd be getting up and taking it out if it wakes up, so there are no messes inside and no bad experiences or confusion about where to potty. And once the toilet training is fairly reliable, I'd be moving the crate - a couple of inches each night towards where you want the dog to be sleeping...

  7. #7
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    My son recently got a pup with severe separation anxiety.

    They acquired a special collar from the vets that releases a scent that the mother dog does. This definitely helped their puppy settle down and could be worth trying if the clock/ radio doesn't work.

  8. #8
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    So many great ideas here! We had the crate door open last night, but have puppy proofed the entire area with baby gates, etc. She also has puppy pads that she is being incredible with. Always goes there, which is great. We also tried the ticking clock last night, and heated a towel in the dryer to leave with her before we went to bed at 10pm. Didn't hear her crying until about 1.30am, and then she'd quiet down again and wake up every 2 or so hours. It's getting better, but I feel like it's a pretty slow process. The collar from the vet might be an idea as well. Is giving her a kong toy with some sneaky treats in there of a night time a good idea to keep her preoccupied and potentially tire her out?

  9. #9
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    Another thing, I think she tires herself out so much when she cries through the night (actually, it's not just crying...it's attempting howls and squawking, basically), that she is less tired throughout the night. Any tips for that? I have the backdoor open so that she has free range of the backyard whenever (also puppy proofed), but she still seems a little hesitant at the moment. Someone please tell me that this is all normal behaviour for an 8-week-old female Siberian Husky on her 4th night with a new family!

  10. #10
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    Separation anxiety is over diagnosed. Pups will scream, cry, thump at crates/doors etc because the breeders never separated them off while they were there properly. It's not SA, it's simply a pup trying what will work to get attention and try and work out what the right thing to do is in this new environment. The process should be started from about 5 weeks of age.

    Do you know what Koehler recommended? Give the pup 3 days, if it's still screaming go out and give it a good bum smacking to make it be quiet. He trained all of Walt Disney's dogs for the movies. Now I'm not advocating going smacking your puppy, but the idea behind the no nonsense approach is there. Puppies are in a phase of experimentation - they pull every trick from the book to see what is rewarded and what is not. Now puppies cry, we worry, we go see them and give them attention or we do not stop the behavior so it rolls on. I've seen dogs throw incredible screaming fits when to get their own way, just like toddlers will.

    Wake the pup up during the day. No nap time all day, up and playing, walking, whatever. Trust me the pup will sleep throught the night no problem if it's tired enough. Help her out, guide her outside, don't let her baulk. A puppy should be carefree, running about at things, falling over, covered in dirt etc. Take her outside and give her a feed out there once a day if the weather is OK to help her understand otuside is pretty alright. She doesn't need a DAP collar, save yourself the money and put in more time with her at this stage it will pay back a thousand times over when she's an adult.

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