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Thread: Our eight-week-old female Siberian Husky puppy cries at night. Help!

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Australia
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    6

    Exclamation Our eight-week-old female Siberian Husky puppy cries at night. Help!

    Hi all,

    We have just spent our 4th night with our brand new puppy, and have set her up in a room with a crate bed (open door), puppy pads, and plenty of toys. She is perfect with toileting on the pads, but has been struggling to sleep of a night time. For the first few nights, she practically freaked out...but last night, we put a ticking clock in with her, as well as a lamp, and she slept for four hours straight, followed by two-hour periods. She still really cries when she wakes up and realises that she is alone. Has this happened with anyone else out there? Is this normal puppy behaviour? Any tips anyone can offer? All suggestions are welcome. I would just like her to be comfortable enough to sleep for a decent period of time throughout the night.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    3,082

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    hiya emmajordan91.
    YES, its happened to most of us dog owners, if we took on a 8 week old baby anything.
    Hang in there. It really does pass.
    The crate bed open door, can you have this near you so you can lean your arm over and just touch her? It helps to buy another hour sometimes.
    From what you wrote, you are already noticing a definite improvement.
    It sounds like you know what your doing. But doubting yourself/the pup? But this is absolutely normal 4th night, ripped from its mother and siblings, where all smelt safe n familiar etc etc.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I agree with Nekhbet to some extent (not the good bum smack bit).

    If you give the puppy attention for making noise - the puppy will make more noise to get your attention.

    So you have two choices
    choice 1 - give attention immediately and ideally before the puppy gets into full howl mode, even if your initial attention is just "wait a minute".
    choice 2 - wait until all the screaming and yelling has stopped before the puppy gets any attention.

    What you don't want the puppy to learn is all it has to do is scream a little bit longer (hours and hours if necessary) and it will get your attention.

    Human example:

    Kid wants a candy bar at the shop checkout queue. Parents say no. Kid starts to act up. 10 minutes of solid screaming later - the parents cave and give the kid the candy bar.

    Could have saved all the rest of us all that screaming if the candy bar had been handed over immediately. And I would have tolerated 20 minutes of screaming as long as it was not rewarded.

    My dog knows both "in a minute" and "no way in hell am I rewarding that"...
    Example - I shut her outside while I'm busy vacuuming inside (so much easier to do without doggy help). She barks a single bark - to see if I've forgotten her. I can say "in a minute" or nothing. She knows "in a minute" means I haven't forgotten her, so she doesn't keep barking. But she might try another test bark in about 30 minutes just to check (cos I am terrible about things like that). Sometimes she tries screaming... and I might tell her "not going to happen", but usually she gets completely ignored until she shuts up for a significant while (eg 5 minutes or more).

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    merged the threads and put in puppy discussion. saves the regulars trying to keep up with two threads on the same problem.

  5. #15

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    Emmajordan your baby puppy is adorable!

    When we adopted Brian from the shelter he was (fortunately) already crate trained. The advice I was given was, half hour or so before you go to bed to take him outside for toiletting and sniffs. Then give him a kong filled with a few bits of his regular kibble and a couple of tiny, yummy, treats. (Shred of chicken or liver or similar) peanut butter on the end. Special bedtime toy and comfy soft blanket. Say 'Crate' and goodnight, shut the door.
    We were told if he cried, which he did, we were to throw a blanket over the crate, as soon as he stopped take the blanket off. I also did this in the daytime when I needed to sweep or shower or whatever.

    Hopefully puppy will learn to like her crate and associate it with special treats I know Brian does, it's the only time he has the kong. Often I will find him in there in the daytime fast asleep recharging his batteries.

    And he STILL goes to bed snuggled up to Winnie the Pooh, all 44 kilos of him.

  6. #16

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    Four hours is a pretty good stretch for a little baby with a little bladder...

    My usual trick with baby pups is food and warmth. A tired, full, and really warm pup can't put up much of a fight against sleep. Babies like this are usually missing the warmth and comfort of their siblings and/or mum. Hot water bottle/s or plug in heated pet beds (both in positions that cords or bottles can't be chewed of course!) can make all the difference.

    I notice you said she slept well with a warm towel - if she wakes up to pee then you need to re-warm it before you put her back to bed.

  7. #17

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    Emmajordan, A couple of us have told you to place the crate next to your bed in a position where you can just drape a hand into the top of the crate and the pup will calm down and go back to sleep. Trust me, this does work. We have had, probably, 20 pups, in tha last 30 years or so and they all went through that initial whine phase in one or two nights. A soft crate with a zip opening on the top is the go. It must be large enough to be usable when she gets bigger. THE DOOR MUST BE CLOSED.

    A bit of play with her, after toileting, and just before you turn off the lights will help her sleep. The play should be enough to tire her. Use a flirt pole with a piece of sheep skin on the end. You can also use this time to start the retrieve training. When she catches the sheep skin praise her lavishly and slowly pull the cord and sheep skin back to you, shaking and gently tug all the way in. Lavish praise when she is in your lap.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
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    I was under the impression that a smaller enclosed space will make the pup feel more secure. If crate training, I'm not sure what the advantage is of leaving the door open...?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    I have had many pups and with each one I put them in a box or crate right next to my bed. Take them for toileting before I go to bed, once around 2 ish and then about 5 ish. Never had any problems at all. If they remained restless after toiletting a few words or a hand stuck in the box soon settled them. My dogs have never needed or been offered for that matter warm whatevers because I believe my prescence, voice or hand was enough. Mind you my dogs have all been herding breeds and fairly biddable and wanting to be close to me, in fact they seek to be with me rather than with other dogs right from babies. Huskys can be quite independent dogs so dont know if that makes a difference.

    During the day I will play, cuddle and do some basic training. I like to take a no nonsense approach to raising puppies. I dont have time or inclination to deal with prima donna behaviour but I do provide a basis that a puppy will find comforting while teaching the boudaries and skills it will need to be a well behaved member of the family.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Australia
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    6

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    Just thought I'd send on a quick update! Our little miss is now 9 weeks old, and we have made so much progress. We decided not to crate train, but are instead confinement training (she has her own little space). She is generally sleeping through the night with a ticking clock, low tv, and a dim light...but we are going to slowly ween her off of them as she gets more comfortable. We take her out during the night for toileting, but she is perfect with her puppy pads (which we are gradually making smaller and smaller). On the nights that she wakes up, we are working on getting her to settle herself and put herself back to bed. Anyone got any extra tips for that? Had our first puppy pre-school class on the weekend, and she was amazing! So good to see her learning as much as she is. All of your advice has been so good, and I cannot thank you enough. Another thing we're trying to conquer at the moment is puppy nipping! So if anyone has any tips on puppy nipping or getting her to settle herself if she wakes up of a night time, please let me know. So so very happy about the progress my little girl has made!

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