Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Venturingwith Buddy to the dog park!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Sydney NSW
    Posts
    11

    Smile Venturingwith Buddy to the dog park!

    Hi All,
    Well Buddy just graduated Puppy School and the trainers suggested taking Buddy out to the Dog Park to wear off some energy and to continue socialisation.

    Buddy is not jumping as much with strangers but still quite crazy at puppy school and plays a bit rough.

    What would be your tips for taking a puppy to the dog park for the first time? I'm nervous!!

    He's had all his immunisation. I will check if the local parks are fenced or not. His recall is ok but I think it would disappear of there were lots of other dogs around! So I think he may have to stay on the leash.

    My main concern is that he won't have great manners with other dogs and will tick one off.

    Thanks for all your feedback,

    -Kelly

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Maybe don't take him yet.
    He could get hurt quite easily.
    Walk him around the local shops instead and sit him down every now and again.

    This will get him used to people, crowds and traffic.
    Reward him for calm behaviour at every opportunity.

    Take him to puppy school early for extra playtime or try to organise play dates
    with other puppy owners there.
    Please read the other threads re Dog Parks.
    They can be very dangerous places.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

    Default

    I wish I'd never taken my pup to a dog park.
    There are lots of ways to 'wear off energy' without setting foot in a dog park.
    Chubbs suggestion is excellent, also, consider joining your local dog club. This will give exposure to other dogs in a controlled environment, and the training will benefit both of you.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Dog park - first time round I'd try to go at a not-peak time.

    Eg dinner time or school pick up time - when everybody else is busy.

    Avoid - after school and after work times. And after dinner in the dark - when the bad aggressive dogs go out to play.

    Before work - is often good - as the early time slot ie early enough to walk the dog, get home have a shower and get changed and commute to the CBD - those are the serious dog people. So at one of my dog parks that's 6am to 7:30am. There's a gap of few dogs between 7:30am and 8am - when the next wave of dog walkers show up, people who work shifts, or don't work at all, or have kids old enough to get themselves to school... Pretty sure the actual times will be different depending where you live and how far most of the people where you live travel to get to work or drop their kids off at school.

    The first time you go to a dog park - it might be a good idea to walk around the outside and keep your puppy on lead. If there aren't any other dogs, or they're the same size and you've got some idea that the owners inside are paying attention, and when you walk around the outside there can be some safe sniffing and greeting through the fence and you get a feel for which dogs are rude or aggressive and how your dog copes with that... Any sign of rudeness from your dog or the other dogs, don't go in.

    And my golden rule for off lead time - a nice calm sit-stay so I can get the lead undone. If evil hound is pulling and lunging and barking - she stays on lead.

    Watch your dog, especially if you get distracted by having to pick up after - that's when they get into trouble. Try to supervise all greetings with new dogs so that you can get your dog out of trouble if it starts. If your dog is harassing a dog or person that clearly doesn't like it - get your dog. Older dogs and people do not cope well with puppies - puppies are too rough, and even an innocent jump up can rip skin open on an older person, or hurt an older dog with sore joints.

    Same goes for small children - small children are savage - they always go to poke the dog in the eye. Even if they live with a dog, they can be remarkably rude and not dog savvy. Do not give them the opportunity to hurt you puppy. And their parents tend to be even more savage - you can't scold the child or the parent, just make sure all is safe or keep your dog away from them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I think good dog park experiences are great for pup and owner but bad ones can be truly awful.

    After I struggled with my dog freaking out because of in your face, over the top dogs at the dog park and increasingly struggling to politely greet approaching dogs herself, I've taken some of the advice here in board and will leave of things aren't going well.

    I have the opposite problem though. My dog is the one that will snap at dogs that barge up to her. But she does have excellent recall.

    If there are dogs that get annoyed by boisterous pups, you may find it very tiring to constantly pull your pup away. On the other hand, older dogs putting your pup in his place when he is being rude can be an effective way to teach him manners. But that can get out of hand, especially if the other dogs' owners have no control over them.

    I think the latter is the key. Don't go in or don't stay when you notice that the other owners are not supervising their dogs and/or have no control over them. There is simply nothing to gain from an environment like that.

    If the owners seem to pay attention to their dog, have control over them and intervene when necessary, it doesn't really matter what kind of dogs they have. Even if their dogs are a bit reactive or boisterous. You can work with that and the other owners will usually be understanding if your pup goes a bit bonkers.

    One thing I try to do with my dog is to reward her for calming signals and appropriate greetings.

    Probably still safer and easier to go to your local dog club for socialisation though. I'm pretty sure our local one gives access to a fenced area for members to exercise their dogs outside of classes.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    I think the latter is the key. Don't go in or don't stay when you notice that the other owners are not supervising their dogs and/or have no control over them. There is simply nothing to gain from an environment like that.

    If the owners seem to pay attention to their dog, have control over them and intervene when necessary, it doesn't really matter what kind of dogs they have. Even if their dogs are a bit reactive or boisterous. You can work with that and the other owners will usually be understanding if your pup goes a bit bonkers.


    Very good points here - you need to assess the other owners and dogs. (before you enter with pup)
    Dogs that are attentive and obedient to their owners will be good for your puppy to interact with/play.

    If you have time maybe go and observe the groups using your local park.

    Do you have some pictures of your pup? Would love to see him.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Sydney NSW
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chubbsecurity View Post
    [I]

    Do you have some pictures of your pup? Would love to see him.
    I'll have to take a graduation picture! LOL

    I am taking him to play with an older pup today who is well socialised so I will see how he goes. Then I might take him for a walk past the dog park and then if safe around the dog park on a leash. I'll see what it's like and if theres some friendly looking owners and dogs we will go from there =)

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •