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Thread: Naughty Lab Puppy

  1. #11
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    If you have a dog club close by check out and see if they run obedience classes. They are usually inexpensive and a good way to both socialise your dog in controlled company and learn some obedience training and they are usually fun too. Labs are lovely intelligent dogs. We had quite a few naughty lab pups come through the obedience classes our dog club ran and it was amazing the difference it made.

    I dont tolerate biting, as I have had a couple of mouthy cattle dogs. With one I taught her she could be mouthy if I had a pair of thick gloves on but no way on human flesh. I just said ouch in a very dissaproving tone and immediately stopped all playing. My dogs soon go the idea that all fun stops immediately if they engage hard on my flesh. Deflecting them on to a tug is okay but if they dont learn that flesh is off limits they will often latch on to the hand holding the tug.

    I found crate training puppies is a great way to give them a place where they are contained and can learn to chill out.

    Once she starts to learn some manners and boundaries and you introduce some structured training, the barking should ease up. Engaging their brains will often tire them out. I just dont engage with my dogs if they whine and bark and they soon learn that such behaviour gets them nowhere fast. I am very quick to reward and praise good behaviour even if I havent asked for it. If they are lying quietly in their crates I tell them what good dogs they are.

    Dogs are often good with routine, and will learn to chill when they recognise that it is not their time for walks, games, training etc.

    Do not let her drag the cat by its neck. I would actually be pretty firm with that, voice your dissaproval when you recognise the impending signs of roughness before it starts and stop her. One of our cats was killed by one of our young dogs in that manner, and there was not a mark on her, it can happen very quickly and instantly and without it looking particularly rough and a lab is a lot stronger and heavier than a cat and a neck can dislocate easily enough.

    It is a very dangerous activity for your cat even if the cats appears to enjoy engagement with the dog, our cat did and I am sure the dog didnt mean to kill her. They got on well together. We learnt the hard way.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-24-2013 at 07:39 PM.

  2. #12
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    biting - every time she goes to bite your hands slip your thumb under her tongue and press firmly. If she grabs your feet or clothes scruff her and hold on until she settles. Don't say a word, just grasp her firmly until she gets the hint it's not on. Give her a moment to think, offer your hand and if she only licks say 'good dog' quietly as not to raz her up.

    barking - get a little squirt bottle and put some water and with a squeeze of lemon in there. Ignore her barking, count to 10 if she has not stopped give her a quick squirt right between the eyes. Again, don't say a word otherwise you just play to her attention grabbing.

    As for being an outside dog, totally outside or just when you are not home? If you want a totally outside dog then leave her outside 24/7 now and ignore the ensuing screaming due to pack separation. If you want a part time outside dog then put her outside with meals, treats, toys etc and inside time is quiet time only (pats, lay on mat etc) so being outside is not a chore to the dog.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by peppersmummy View Post
    Hi Everyone,

    I am new to the DOGFORUM but am happy to have signed up it is very useful

    Anyway, i have a 5 month old Lab - her name is pepper. She is such a naughty but beautiful girl. i know puppies need lots of training etc. and of course puppies are going to be craaaaazy but I need some tips on a few different things she does.

    BITING:
    She loves to bite, if you pat her and she is in a playful mood which is most of the time she lieks to play by biting your hands, or even sometimes your feet, and now she is getting older and getting big chompers it hurts alot more than when she was a baby. the only advice i have been given is to be consistant and giving her a toy whenever she goes to bite and i have done this for the last 5 months but she still prefers fingers!

    BARKING:
    If pepper isn't recieving attention or doesn't have her way e.g. not picking her up or putting her on the lounge she will bark at you constantly in a very high pitch LOUD bark.

    SOOKINESS:
    I think i may of spoil her too much but she is very very very sooky, she has to be with you 24/7 or she cries and sooks, I love being with her all the time and spending as much time as i possibly can with her but sometimes i have to go to work or do things. She is slowly becoming and outside dog (as we have a large yard we didnt want to put her out there straight away). we also have a 9year old lab who she absolutley adores.

    PLAYING WITH THE CAR:
    Pepper likes to play with our cat and the cat also likes to play with Pepper however after a few seconds Pepper gets way to rough and drags the cat by the neck with her teeth!

    We have used a few methods to avoid hitting the dog (which i refuse to do) but every method we have tried she thinks is fun and games, and it doesn't bother her whatsoever.

    these are the few problems that i can think of at the moment, i am sure there will be plenty more that pop up but for the moment if anyone could please give me some advice on any of these issues it would be greatly appreciated

    Thanks Guys
    Hi I am currently fostering a dog that is exactly how you have described. Nobody ever taught him how to be polite and respect personal space, and his owners ended up leaving him in the garden all the time because he was not enjoyable to have around. They got rid of him because they were having a baby and couldn't tolerate his jumping and use of brute strength to get his own way. He's a very gentle good natured dog, but completely antisocial and horrible to have around when we first got him. The kicker is that if they'd bothered to train him and interact with him properly in his first year of life, he would have been fine. Your 5 month old puppy will not be 5 months old forever, and you don't want to end up with the type of dog I have to fix.

    It seems like the main thing you are doing wrong is giving her affection and positive attention for everything, instead of making her earn it with good behaviour. From this point onwards, observe your own reactions to what she's doing, and ask yourself how she will interpret it. Only give her pats and nice words when she's behaving in a way that you like. If she's being a pain in the bum, withdraw your attention, go cold, and ignore her. She will naturally start doing the things that get her positive reactions from you.

    BITING: This is normal puppy behaviour but very antisocial for an adult dog. You need to address this ASAP, make sure when she bites you all positive attention stops. This means when you're patting or cuddling her and she bites you, say "OW" or "NO" and grab her lower jaw momentarily between your fingers like nekhbet said. If she keeps biting, turn away and give her the cold shoulder and the silent treatment for a few minutes. If you can't manage to physically restrain her without losing your cool, ignoring is a good way to teach a dog that behaviour is unwanted. It's VERY important that you stay calm and collected at all times while you interact with her. As soon as you get ruffled, she has won and she will know it.

    BARKING: This is very spoiled behaviour and you must not give her positive attention for it. If you've been indulging her by doing what she wants when she barks, she will have learned that this is what she has to do to get her own way. Dogs learn by association, so when she performs a certain behaviour she will associate it with whatever your reaction is. She is thinking "when I bark, I get my own way".
    On the first bark, say "QUIET" in a firm voice. If she is quiet, tell her she's a good dog. If she keeps barking, take her by the collar and put her outside or somewhere else where she will be separated from you. She will put up a fuss but eventually quiet down. When she's quiet, allow her to be close to you again and tell her she's a good dog. She will quickly associate barking with unpleasant things happening to her.

    OUTSIDE: I never really recommend keeping a dog outside 24/7 because I believe it's not natural. Dogs aren't solitary creatures and spend all their lives with their pack. If you want a totally well-balanced dog you're going to have to allow it to be near you most of the time, whether this is outside or inside.

    CAT: When she's rough with the cat and the cat can't handle the situation, pick the cat up and take it away from her, leaving her alone. Otherwise I'd just let the cat deal with her, if it keeps going back to play with her then it obviously associates her with friendship and fun. Unless the cat is making noises of pain and distress, don't interfere.

    Above all, BE CONSISTENT!!! It's no good reacting one way sometimes, and another way other times. Decide how you're going to tackle her issues and then do the same thing from then on. That will help her learn quickly because she will know there is only one outcome from annoying you.


    TL;DR: Watch your own behaviour, always stay calm, and only give the dog positive attention when she's being good.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosh View Post
    CAT: When she's rough with the cat and the cat can't handle the situation, pick the cat up and take it away from her, leaving her alone. Otherwise I'd just let the cat deal with her, if it keeps going back to play with her then it obviously associates her with friendship and fun. Unless the cat is making noises of pain and distress, don't interfere.

    .
    This is the only part of your post I disagree with. We thought that way and ended up with a dead cat. Sometimes cats dont deal effectively with it. Ours was such a good natured cat and allowed herself to be pulled around and ended up having her neck broken when the dog was pulling her by the neck, exactly the same way that this lab is doing. She never made a sound of pain or distress.

    A heavy dog can snap a cats neck easily and quickly without meaning to, one quick shake. Some cats deal with dogs very effectively, but not all. If this cat is allowing itself to be dragged by the neck I would take definitive action and not allow the puppy to do this.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-26-2013 at 03:28 PM.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post
    This is the only part of your post I disagree with. We thought that way and ended up with a dead cat. Sometimes cats dont deal effectively with it. Ours was such a good natured cat and allowed herself to be pulled around and ended up having her neck broken when the dog was pulling her by the neck, exactly the same way that this lab is doing. She never made a sound of pain or distress.

    A heavy dog can snap a cats neck easily and quickly without meaning to, one quick shake. Some cats deal with dogs very effectively, but not all. If this cat is allowing itself to be dragged by the neck I would take definitive action and not allow the puppy to do this.
    I don't know much about cats and I assumed that they would voice their disapproval the same way a dog would. I'm sorry your cat died, that sounds awful.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosh View Post
    I don't know much about cats and I assumed that they would voice their disapproval the same way a dog would. I'm sorry your cat died, that sounds awful.
    I am not much of a cat person but my dad liked them so we had them for years. Some can really deal with dogs, one of ours nearly took one of the dogs eye out and punctured the cornea and another was one cool dude around dogs and they left him alone, but they are not all like that.

    They can also put themselves in danger if they decide to run. Where cats and dogs are concerned it is a case by case scenario. It also depends on the dog. I always take the view especially with bigger dogs and terriers that the cat is most likely to come off second best.

  7. #17
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    I feel for you as I have a 10 mth old GSD girl monster, it's been a long time since we've had a puppy I'd forgotten what it was like and I can't wait till she matures.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  8. #18

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    THANKS SO VERY MUCH for a wonderful response. lots of tips, links and advice to get me started. I MADE A HUGE ERROR no idea how but Pepper is actually on 3 months almost 4, I always knew that so no idea why I posted 5!

    She is such a gorgeous little girl and I think myself and my partner are to blame for her behaviours, when we first got her we spoiled her to the point where the first week was very hot and both my parter and I took turns in sleeping on the cold tiles inside with her! DRASTIC!

    I disipline her much more now but think I am still too leniant with her. She is such a gorgeous little thing, has so much character but just a naughty little girl. She jumps up on you whilst walking, jumps on you whilst sitting down and constantly wants to be on you. It is also a disturbance with our older LAB as he is thinking it is ok to copy the same behaviours... e.g. When opening the front door, bursting and pushing past me and running inside.. beau now does it as well.

    so frustrating!!!!

  9. #19
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    When you put in some effort now to encourage the behaviours you want and ignore or discourage the behaviours you don't like until they stop, in hindsight it will have seemed such a small effort to get a dog that is a pleasure to have around. But as someone above said, you do have to constantly be aware of how your actions (or non actions) are perceived by your pup. It is not really about a couple of training sessions a day, every interaction is training for your pup. But when you know what you want to achieve, it soon becomes second nature to ensure that you show your pup what is on and what is not all the time.

    I had a very jumpy dog too and used mainly withdrawal of attention to stop her jumping on us. For example, to stop her from jumping up when we came home, we would open the door very slightly and then waited for her to sit. Then we'd open the door a bit more, but as soon as she got up, we closed the door again and started again. Then we went in but if she jumped at all, we'd just go out again, closed the door and back from the start. It only took us about a week to make her stop jumping on us altogether. If ever she relapsed after that, we only had to do the routine once and she was good again.

    With jumping on visitors, I used the time-out method. Put her in the laundry for 30 seconds each time she tried to jump or was otherwise annoying to them. After a while I only had to put her in time-out once for her to start behaving. Though I wasn't consistent enough and she is still not perfect with visitors and still tries to climb on their laps, etc. Might do some more training around that soon.

  10. #20

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    Your pup sounds like my cattle dog when she was a baby, she did the jumping, nipping and yapping to get your attention. To solve this I just totally ignored her until she sat down and behaved herself. By the time we got a cat she already knew the word 'gentle' so if she ever gets too rough I can just say 'gentle' and she settles. I've also taught the cat game rules like no claws so she doesn't go stirring the dogs up and get herself hurt. Another thing to do is to make sure the cat always has somewhere to hide where the dog can't get to just in case the pup starts getting too rough when your not around.

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