Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Barking cavoodle

  1. #1

    Talking Barking cavoodle

    We are first time dog owners. Completely new and have had to learn from vets, friends, dog school, Internet ..Anyway our cavoodle is just about 9 months old. She has been sleeping in the laundry at night since 8 weeks old todate. She plays in the backyard in the day and we have had no problems. Recently she found her voice and keeps barking. She will bark when the neighbours let their dog out . She will bark after her breakfast. Before 8 am, and i am worried the other neighbours will complain. As it is, my kids are already feeling sleep deprived. During the day as well, she will bark even when we are in. Once we go out to tell her to be quiet, she will stop but start agin after a while. When we are out, I presume she will also bark. She will bark at night if something wakes her from sleep. My husband has been trying to make her sleep outside for the past week. We made an enclosure round our pergola and she cannot run into the backyard. On bad nights, we will bring her in at night. Last night, she was unsettled outside and as soon as the neighbour's dog started to bark, she would start barking too. We brought her in and she slept for a while then started barking past midnight until she tired herself out and fell sleep and woke up 3 hours past her normal time this morning.

    She is normally quite a good dog. We attend puppy school weekly and she generally socialise quite well.

    Unsure what to do with her barking and sleeping and I do not want to hurt the puppy. However, we cannot let the puppy rule our life as per my husband ) Any feedback will help. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    How much exercise is she getting?

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    How much exercise is she getting?

    We walk her daily. Mini

  4. #4

    Default

    Oops ! Meant to type minimum 30 mins. Have tried twice per day too but she developed a limp a couple of months ago (ok now), so I made it once a day. Sometimes 40 mins.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Melbourne VIC
    Posts
    607

    Default

    What type of walking? On lead, loosely, pulling constantly, off lead at a dog park? Any mental stimulation at home?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Frozen bones...big ones keep my guys busy. Pigs ears too. You need to be tough with the outside thing...she probably thinks now that if she barks alot , even at nothing you'll eventually cave in so she keeps at it. Tough love is tough on both owner and dog but worth it in the long run.

    Maybe leave a light on or a radio going so she hears voices and thinks she's not alone.....there are heaps of good ideas but they dont always work unfortunately. Hope you have a win sooner or later.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Pawfectionist View Post
    What type of walking? On lead, loosely, pulling constantly, off lead at a dog park? Any mental stimulation at home?
    Her daily walks are on lead. It is a mixture of loose lead and her pulling to get ahead or to sniff something. Maybe 65% loose lead. Off lead once a week at a "dog park" within the dog obedience grounds. Mental a stimulation st home - unsure if we r doing it right but we have used the kong, treat ball, "train" her daily with what we have learnt at obedience school - sit,stand,drop,stay,right about turn etc.

  8. #8

    Default

    It sounds like you are doing the right thing. My understanding from watching positive reinforcement dog shows and reading books is that providing mental and physical exercise goes along way towards solving the problem. There is no problem with discipline as long as you don't hurt the dog or create a negative association between yourself and the discipline (ie the dog doesn't associate you with a loud distracting noise or a spray from a water gun). I would try maybe clapping my hands to get her attention and saying "dog's name... QUIET" then praising her if she stops barking. If that doesn't work, maybe try making a louder noise to distract her (when she can't see you), then praising her for quiet. Try and catch her out every time when you are home (I appreciate this is a lot of work but if you think of it as a bit of a game then it might not seem so bad), and keeping her away from distractions when you are out if you think she is barking alot in the day. This might mean keeping her in a room with a tiled floor when you are out if this is feasible, or at least somewhere where she can't see the street or the neighbours, until the barking habit is broken.Good luck - she is young, and will probably learn quite quickly. Poodles are very smart!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Structure and routine is required. Your dog has no idea what it's meant to be doing at what time so start from the start. Personally at night I would get a dog crate for the dog, put it in your bedroom (toy breeds are not good at pack separation particularly at night) and cover it. Dog goes in, toy and chewy treat goes in too, dog goes to sleep. End of story.

    During the day as well, she will bark even when we are in. Once we go out to tell her to be quiet, she will stop but start agin after a while.
    Also, if you are inside why is the dog alone outside? Why don't you leave the door ajar and let the dog come inside with you, then go out as it needs to? They are companion animals, satisfaction comes from being close to their family. I have 4 large guarding breed dogs and you barely hear a thing unless you knock on the door, I leave the back door open for them when I am home they can do what they please, play outside or come in and be quiet on the floor/couch/bed next to me. Mental stimulation is an inclusive exercise, it's not just toys and walks, it's quality time with the dog .... even if that just means laying down on your lap for an hour watching TV and getting a pat.

    She's also not a puppy, she's almost an adult well and truly and treat her as such. I think your problems mostly stem from a lack of pack interaction with you and lack of structure in general. The oodles do tend to be yappy dogs if left to their own devices.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

    Default

    Hi 'newdog' and welcome to the forum!
    I have an 18 month old Cavoodle. Genetically they are dogs who thrive on being part of the family and will be a problem if left in the back yard when you are home. I would recommend that she is indoors whenever you are home, but must have access to the yard for toiletting.
    Your pup is still at the chewing stage, so everyone in the family is responsible for ensuring nothing is left on the floor! Lot's of patience with house training for the next few months, then you will have a delightful addition to your family for the next 10-12 years.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •