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Thread: Little howling problem

  1. #1

    Default Little howling problem

    Hi guys!

    I recently bought home an alaskan malamute pup. He is the cutest little thing, until he is put away at night. He has not had his second set of shots so obviously I can't put him outside and he is not properly toilet trained yet. He howls until he loses his voice. I have tried everything- clocks, hot water bottles, radio etc. nothing works. I know it is expected in the first few days of bringing a new pup home, but it is just getting excessive. Does anyone have any advice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Default

    Have you tried putting his bed next to yours? That worked for my puppy. Now she's older she's quite happy to sleep in a separate room to me, but not when she was a tiny puppy.

    You're not alone - there's quite a few threads about this.

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/puppy-dis...ht-crying.html

    Puppy sleeping google site search

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm just worried about him toileting throughout the night. It's obvious that the breeder who we got him for didn't instil any toilet training at all before we got him. I also want him to be able to be by himself, as I work and my partner is a shift worker.

  4. #4
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    Embraham

    If the puppy is less than 4 months old - he's not going to last all night or all day either. You're going to have to get up and take him outside a couple of times a night.

    What I did was tie a long lead to my dog and run it under me to the far side of the bed. I'm a pretty light sleeper anyway but if she woke up, I took her straight outside for toileting and acted completely boring until she performed, and then praised lots, and straight back to bed.

    It's one of the joys of having a puppy - the toilet training.

    And then there is destructo puppy.

    Have you considered crate training for when you're out or not able to fully supervise?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Yep, if he is only young he will need to go out a few times during the night to go to the toilet. Of course there will be accidents, you can't avoid them while you are toilet training. But that comes with having a puppy.

    Also keep in mind, when he is howling and carrying on he is doing it for attention. As soon as you come to him he has gotten what he wants and next time will do it just as long if it means you coming back again.

    I agree with crate training and having the crate in your room. That way he will feel close to you. I also kept my pups and kitten close to me when they were babies.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    near Sydney NSW
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    Default

    Hi Embraham! Welcome to the forum!
    I remember the joys of bringing a new puppy home! It's over tooo quickly.
    Are you training your pup to toilet inside on puppy pads or newspaper, or do you take him outside to toilet?
    When I brought my pup home I gave her a large cuddly bear I'd had for years. For the first few months she always chose to sleep snuggled up to the bear, it must have given her some comfort. She didn't ever cry at night after the first night. Maybe I was lucky, maybe it was the bear which probably had traces of my smell!
    Good luck with it all.

  7. #7
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    Welcome!

    If you're toilet training, it is best to have the pup in the same room as you anyway, so you can get up and take him out during the night whenever her needs to go. Crate training sounds like a good solution to try avoid accidents in your room. There's more to it then just locking pup up though. Do a search for some resources on how to go about.

    There's a big difference between being alone at night and during the day too. There are lots of things you can do to train your pup to be able to stay alone during the day and avoid separation anxiety. The most important thing is to use lots of rewards for being calm and to provide lots of entertainment when he is left by himself. Chew toys, interactive toys, hidden food, etc.

    Good luck!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Default

    Lots of good ideas above. Find one that suits you. Most importantly the more you go to the dog the louder he will howl because he knows that is what brings you to him.

    I prefer and recommend to my puppy owners that puppy is allowed to sleep in a crate beside the bed. Take him to the toilet around 10:30pm then put him in his crate when the house settles for the night, get up again 3-4 hours later and take him out to the toilet and then get him up early in the morning about 6am. I generally then let puppy spend time outside by himself in the morning.

    When I have a litter they are in a play pen, they have a bed and toys in one half of the pen and a papered corner, when I hear them on the paper, my husband and I leap out of bed and get them out to the grass, we cannot always get all puppies up and out before some accidents (6 to 9 puppies is a lot to scoop up and get outside) when they have no bladder control. We do this from about 6 weeks of age thru to when they leave. So even though most my puppies are partially toilet trained at my house, the stress of a new home and a different environment means they still need more training.

    While I don't recommend a play pen for a single puppy for toilet training a suitable sized crate with paper at the front or rear will have the same affect, you will hear him/her on the paper. Put the crate next to your bed.

    As for vaccinations. Puppy can roam your yard but not go to dog parks or places where dog congregate. I take them to shopping centres etc to get used to noises. It's no use waiting until puppy is 16 weeks of age to get them out.

    Puppies are lots of work and upset the household for the first few weeks but then they quickly get into our routine and settle. What you put into them is what you'll get out of them.
    Last edited by MAC; 12-06-2012 at 08:06 AM.

  9. #9
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    Default

    We discovered Maggie just plain hated the dark, a night light helped. But I suspect the crate training option would help you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    melbourne australia
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    I dont think i have ever gotten up to take a pup to the toilet at night. Ever. And was taught by my ex husband, that if you are nasty when woken, things stop waking you. kids n pups included.

    Crate, by bed. Crate can be anything, from a really expensive one, to a kids travel cot from charity shop whilst house training to go through the night without waking me.
    Ear plugs, and shifts devided by amount of staff on your family team to share it with. Kids should really be about 6yrs of age, before you ask them to get up and take a pup out to toilet anyhow.

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