Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: Puppy pushing my last nerve

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

    Default

    It's a shame we aren't in the same locality Asrais, I'm about to list a baby gate on eBay, you could have had it cheap!!
    It was a great boon for me as Misha is a totally indoor dog and the baby gate was essential for 12 months until I felt she could be trusted with the run of the house!

    Good luck with Pip, it will get easier

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Vic, Australia
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi asrais, could I ask what breed dog is & where you got her from. I've gotton dogs from shelters or local papers, sometimes owners never tell you if pooch likes cats, what your cats need to do is give pooch a good smacking. The dog will either think twice about doing it or it will stay the same, I have a cat who well cant stand dogs big or small. And she's given my small dogs a smacking, tell you what they ran with tails between legs.
    Maybe pooch needs some training, with a more aggressive cat, one that's not afraid of dogs.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    FT, the effect of getting a hiding from a tough cat doesn't necessarily transfer to situations with more timid cats. We foster cats and I had a JRT x here for 3 weeks recently who has been put in his place by a couple of big, scary tomcats, learnt to leave our 10mo adopted cat alone when she refused to run from him, but would still shamelessly bully our somewhat autistic foster cat because she just did not stand up for herself at all.

    Some dogs are just more opportunistic than others and will bully a cat when they can regardless of previous experiences.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    And allowing or encouraging a cat to beat up a dog can lead to the dog losing an eye from an infected scratch (cats have very dirty claws with an almost 100% scratch gets infected rate). And it can also lead to the death of the cat.

    Pretty bad idea, in my opinion.

    Plus a dog can get along fine with this cat, but be totally against another cat. So the shelter people have no way of knowing if that dog will get along with a particular cat or not.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    In most situations, the cats don't need to and won't make contact though. I've seen the odd superficial scratch on a dog's nose after a run-in with a cat but I've never seen a cat full-on attack a dog. A dog (on its own) would have to be pretty psychotic to not back off from a truly angry looking cat.

    I did once fear that I was going to get my own legs shredded when I jumped in between my cat who was defending her young kittens and a Belgian shepherd dog charging towards her. The dog did stop in time and my cat snapped out of her rage before any blows were dealt. My cat was a skinny little thing but her display - complete with spitting and mock attacks - would have put the fear of god into anyone. There is an evolutionary reason for why cats pose like that. It works!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    21

    Default

    With the suggestion of leaving a leash on her all the time to facilitate getting ahold of her: doesn't that risk her getting snagged on something and potential harm to the pup?

    I ask for information only, I promise!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allan53 View Post
    With the suggestion of leaving a leash on her all the time to facilitate getting ahold of her: doesn't that risk her getting snagged on something and potential harm to the pup?

    I ask for information only, I promise!
    It's ok if you're there to supervise. Even if it does get snagged (never happened when I used this method), it's not going to injur them. They trip on it now and then but they get used at walking around like that. Letting a long leash drag behind your dog is often recommended by dog training experts for recall training outside too.

    I actually had to stop using this for a while with the JRT I minded because my dog figured out she could now take him for a walk! Absolutely hilarious to watch, but the JRT couldn't see the humour in it at all.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    260

    Default

    I tried the time out method, putting her in the laundry for 30 seconds when she mouthed the cats, it worked for the first day or two, she got the message, but now she has worked out that she is quicker than me and can hide in places that I can't reach her, so once again the dang dog has outsmarted me

    Things have settled down a little - I sometimes see her wrestling with the cats, when the cats can easily get away - if I didn't know better, I'd think they were playing

    She still chases them though, and it turns into a game if I try to catch her - not good. This usually happens while I am preparing dinner, energy in the house reaches maximum at that point because all the animals get fed and brought in for the night. While I am cooking, I can't have her on her lead, so I think putting her in her crate may be the only option. She won't like it - maybe, if I get her some beef bones - she isn't allowed to have them normally because she buries them and brings them back when they've cured, into the house full of ants and other creepies, but if she is in her crate she can't do that. Hmmm... i think we may have a plan...

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Be persistant Asrais.

    Maybe a waterpistol jet for when she goes somewhere you can't reach. I have a broom handle and a hockey stick too. Dog doesn't stay behind the couch long if I decide to sweep there.

    And I agree about the dinner prep. When my dog was a puppy - she always went in the crate - just so I couldn't trip over her and drop the saucepan full of pasta on her.

    My dog does well with cows hoof in the crate. Also have some deer antler tho I worry that might be harder than her teeth.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Im kinda with FT. Id let the cat give her a bash.

    And failing that, i.e the cat wont, or you really arent comfortable with that, id smack the dog. A quick short sharp rap to the bum.

    Lots of people dont like that, and will think im a horrid owner, but My Pippi had a real thing about chewing electrical cables when she was little, which is potentially fatal for her (and the cables couldnt be put away) and a short sharp rap to the bum worked quickly. Only hard enought o give them a fright though, not enough to actually hurt. She soon learned that every time she went for a cable, she got a wee smack, and she stopped doing it.

    I only use it for major things that could be dangerous, I never just smack for no reason or for just anything, and its not something I continue to do into adulthood either.

    FYI, she is not scared of hands or raised hands at all. She is still a bolshy little ratbag (which is why I adore her).

    Might not be your cuppa, fair enough.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •