Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 73

Thread: Picking the right puppy

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Puppies change so much in the course of a matter of weeks so a one off test for being timid, in a new place to them and by new people I feel will not give you a true insight into their personality.

    I've picked puppies up (for checking, nail clipping etc) sometimes they are compliant and sometimes, eg if you've just interrupted them from a good game with a litter mate and they will react differently. Some are ready for a good sleep and happy to have any lap at other time the same puppy is full of beans, just woken from a big sleep and can't sit still.

    No 5 minute test will give a true insight into puppies personality. Only an observant breeder can do that for you.

    And regardless of how outgoing a pup is, being separated from it's litter mates in the hands of a stranger is not something that many puppies are totally comfortable with immediately, but most move on from it quickly.
    Last edited by MAC; 08-18-2012 at 07:59 AM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    I have read articles on this turning puppy on it's back etc etc, I'm assuming that Paulg has also.
    As have I. And for different purposes. I ask because I'd like to know what PaulG aims to achieve with this 'test'.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    Puppies change so much in the course of a matter of weeks so a one off test for being timid, in a new place to them and by new people I feel will not give you a true insight into their personality.

    I've picked puppies up (for checking, nail clipping etc) sometimes they are compliant and sometimes, eg if you've just interrupted them from a good game with a litter mate and they will react differently. Some are ready for a good sleep and happy to have any lap at other time the same puppy is full of beans, just woken from a big sleep and can't sit still.

    No 5 minute test will give a true insight into puppies personality. Only an observant breeder can do that for you.

    And regardless of how outgoing a pup is, being separated from it's litter mates in the hands of a stranger is not something that many puppies are totally comfortable with immediately, but most move on from it quickly.
    Totally agree with this post. I have a beautiful confident dog that when I went to see as a pup was incredibly timid. I trusted her breeder, met the parent dogs, spent at least 3 hours with the breeder talking, viewing the other dogs, looking at the test papers. Another dog I have was the last dog picked because she didnt seem as energetic as the other pups, again from a breeder I trusted. She turned out to be one of the best agility dogs I ever had and the best temperament.

    With my working dogs I look for a calm temperament. I pick the pup gently up and I like a bold pup that will not struggle wildly and will look me in the eye and make eye contact. Last pup I spent half a day with the breeder watching their dogs work sheep and discussing the dogs and viewing my prospective pup. The breeder had spent time socialising the pups with her kids and the environment.

    I dont understand why you would put a pup on its back or pretend to strike it? I havent heard of that one before and I have had many puppies.

    I cannot understand a breeder that will put their pups through a pet shop. I would expect my clients to want to meet the parent dogs and discuss the pups and my dogs with me and expect that I would be handling and exposing the pups to the environment. I would also like to view potential buyers to make sure they are suited to the pup.

    This whole set up smacks of something not quite right - a breeder putting pups through a pet shop - low care factor of where they are likely to end up. I would want to see the genetic test papers. My breeders photocopy them and give them to me, hip and elbow scores and all the relevent eye tests on the parents.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-18-2012 at 08:51 AM.

  4. #14

    Default

    Thanks for the posts guys.

    I have read about 5 or so differently sourced articles about puppy temperament tests which referred to these techniques, which is why I did them. I should reiterate that when I placed the puppies on their backs it was incredibly gently, and I didn't 'hold them down', but rather lightly placed a hand on their belly - the puppies were able to right themselves at will.

    I also didn't get any where near the puppy with the 'pretend strike', and was speaking in calm tones during it, the aim being to see if they had a negative experience with a raised hand (I stopped about 30 cm away from the puppy so there was no real threat to it).

    I appreciate everyone's comments, and hope you all know that I'm doing my best to firstly find the right puppy, and to source it as ethically as possible. I understand that it is not going to be guaranteed not to shed/size, and will not buy a puppy unless I have the genetic/health testing in writing (if they won't put it in writing, I will not make the purchase).

    Please know that I would also never do anything intentionally to hurt or upset a puppy - I only have the best intentions.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    I pretty much know the "puppy test" you are talking of and no there is no harm done to puppy. I just don't think it's very accurate. And I say this as a breeder.

    Eg. I have a sun loving breed, the Whippet, however prior to them being about 12 weeks old they do not actually seek out the sun. Their eyes are still developing and changing colour and their tolerance of the sun is low. So this is why I dismiss the striking hand theory.

    I also dismiss the laying on back theory unless of course you can do it several times per day over the course of a couple of weeks.

    I believe from experience of watching my own litters that temperament is 50% genetic and 50% environmental and life experience. A bold and outgoing puppy can be turned into a shivering mess once it's left the breeder if sold into the wrong hands and the shy pup once it leaves it's more dominating siblings can come out of it's shell in the right hands.

    And this is also something to look at.

    I only ask that you please consider looking somewhere apart from the pet shop. Particularly the puppy in the window ones. Too much impulse buying where puppy is the loser. Your puppy will be fine, but what of the others that are bought on a whim. Once they are sold the shop gets in a new bunch. So I know people believe they are "saving" that puppy or taking it into a wonderful home, but not all will be and it's a supply and demand situation.

    Just because I breed dogs doesn't mean I do it constantly. A pet shop has a constant supply. Sure there is the odd petshop that correctly sources for people (we did that with our petshop) but with todays internet information even that is no longer necessary.
    Last edited by MAC; 08-18-2012 at 10:05 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulg View Post
    Thanks for the posts guys.

    I have read about 5 or so differently sourced articles about puppy temperament tests which referred to these techniques, which is why I did them. I should reiterate that when I placed the puppies on their backs it was incredibly gently, and I didn't 'hold them down', but rather lightly placed a hand on their belly - the puppies were able to right themselves at will.

    I also didn't get any where near the puppy with the 'pretend strike', and was speaking in calm tones during it, the aim being to see if they had a negative experience with a raised hand (I stopped about 30 cm away from the puppy so there was no real threat to it).

    I appreciate everyone's comments, and hope you all know that I'm doing my best to firstly find the right puppy, and to source it as ethically as possible. I understand that it is not going to be guaranteed not to shed/size, and will not buy a puppy unless I have the genetic/health testing in writing (if they won't put it in writing, I will not make the purchase).

    Please know that I would also never do anything intentionally to hurt or upset a puppy - I only have the best intentions.
    Paul, I understand you have the best intentions. Honestly you can test away all you like on a pup in a pet shop and the result is still likely to be crapshot. The best insight that you will get is spending time with the breeder, the parents and the breeders dogs. Word of mouth from people who have owned the breeders dogs etc.

    Apart from my rescue dogs I will never buy a pup without a good knowledge of the breeder, a good rapport with the breeder and a good understanding of the what the breeders goals are.

    You may well get a nice dog and be a responsible owner, but with a pup from a pet shop you lack major bits of information and have no way of giving feed back to the breeder if things go wrong and problems arise.

    A good friend of mine had to euthaniase her pet shop designer mix when severe HD became apparent. She had no recourse and no way of contacting the breeder - so I guess probably a lot more of these genetically similar dogs went through the pet shops causing potential pain and expense to unsuspecting owners.

    At least when I have had a problem I have gone straight back to the breeder who paid for the hip xrays I needed and took that breeding combination out of her program.

    With my last pup, the breeder told me that he was going to be a handful and various other insights in to the characteristics his line tended to portray. She was absolutely spot on but I was ready and prepared and there were no surprises. He is a fab working dog that in the wrong hands could have been a disaster. But then she would never have put him in the wrong hands and if she had she would have taken him back if things went pear shaped.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-18-2012 at 10:20 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Yep I like to know that if things go wrong I'm the first port of call from the new owners. I'm also there to take my puppy or grown dog back at any stage in it's life if things go wrong.

    A pet shop just can't give you that back up. Look for a breeder that will and settle for nothing less.

    My most recent litter kicked over their first birthday last wednesday. I heard from each of my puppy owners that day and how wonderful that was, but we discussed things like diet, exercise, desexing etc so each had a few questions to ask and most importantly got the answers they needed.

  8. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    Yep I like to know that if things go wrong I'm the first port of call from the new owners. I'm also there to take my puppy or grown dog back at any stage in it's life if things go wrong.

    A pet shop just can't give you that back up. Look for a breeder that will and settle for nothing less.

    My most recent litter kicked over their first birthday last wednesday. I heard from each of my puppy owners that day and how wonderful that was, but we discussed things like diet, exercise, desexing etc so each had a few questions to ask and most importantly got the answers they needed.
    Thanks for the feedback. I'm going to try and see if I can convince the fiancee to hold off until we can find a breeder (or see if I can convince her to get a Lagotto )

    I've just found www.bill abon gcre ekfar m.com.a u/regis tered-bree der.aspx Bil labo ng Creek Farm - Spo o dle & Cav oo dle Breeders - ideally that's what I'm looking for. Someone who clearly cares about their pups and only breeds from pure bread, tested parents.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 08-18-2012 at 06:25 PM. Reason: degoogle

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    honey Bill a b ong Cr eek Fx arm is a puppy farm - they breed dogs on mass at an exhorberant pricetag and have online ordering. The only places you will find Spoodles is backyard breeders, puppy farms or pet stores thats the end of that story. That breeder also says nothing about genetic health testing of parents but 'F1 vigour'. Basically it means the parents can be carriers/suffering a recessive disease but crossing means it probably wont show up in the puppies because they only carry one copy of the gene. As for 'health tests' unless you see the parents have been genetically tested and see proof from a vet clinic, a 'health test' of a vet looking over the dog is NOT good enough particularly for the price charged.

    Gippsland in particular seems to be full of puppy farms. You have your heart set on a spaniel x poodle, so go do it properly. If you want a dog go see the parents and proof they are raised and socialised properly, see the health tests on paper and see the conditions they come from. Don't believe a glossy website.

    Last edited by Hyacinth; 08-18-2012 at 06:23 PM. Reason: degoogle

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    I will not even go the puppy farm way or from the petshop way.....I hate both and enough has been said already

    As t picking puppies...I sped a great deal of time picking puppies for both myself and other people...it is not a one to two hour thing. I go and visit potential puppies from 4 weeks on and i have huge discussions with the breeders who handles the puppies every day. i spend hours sitting with the puppies, especially if it is for myself and for potential water rescue therapy dogs. I use the Volhard system over about five weeks and quite a few visits. But it is talking to the Breeder that gives you the greatest insight on character. I have picked a few puppies for clients who wanted Obedience and drive work dogs and also some for Family pets. The observing puppies from very young works, but you need to know the breeder too. A good Breeder really know the puppies character and possible potential. But the environment after wards also has a great deal to do withthe outcome and end result

    I also know the placing puppy on its back system and it does no harm and does tell you some things. It show confidence and trust.....I amnot sure about the striking one, except maybe for sight???, but in young puppies with still blue eyes that might not be a good reliable result anyway
    Pets are forever

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •