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Thread: A purebred alternative to a spoodle?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    I can tell you at least with a purebred you have a better chance of getting a pup with the personality you want. Purebreeds are there to breed consistency. Cross two totally different breeds together and start playing pot luck, I have seen spoodles that are very snappy and just plain nervy dogs (two actually, both bit the owners very hard) Genetically the puppies also have only a 25% chance of being mostly non shedding. Now that means the hair that falls out stays in the coat, not on your carpet hence more grooming. The crosses are also a little more difficult to groom as they tend to have a mixed coat instead of a standardised all over one and usually need more time grooming, or at least a few professional once all overs every year.

    As for looks, pick which is the poodle and which is the cross

    Attachment 9633

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    They all look like poodle crosses to me!

  2. #22
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    The photos are all of pedigree poodles except the last one which is an actual cocker x poodle. See poodles can have that shaggy dog look too its because we're all too used to seeing them in a breed clip. Originally poodles were meant to have longer coats because they were hunting dogs and spent a lot of time in the water ... you can even do this with a poodle

    545_book_final_cover_joe_4_17_2012.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #23

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    Corded poodles look amazing, there was one at Melbourne Royal a few years back. There are just so many looks you can do with them.

  4. #24

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    Don't forget too that "non-shedding" means more work than a normal dog coat, even in a predictable purebred coat. It needs clipping and careful attention (usually professional grooming) or it can mat at an unbelieveable rate.

  5. #25
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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    The photos are all of pedigree poodles except the last one which is an actual cocker x poodle. See poodles can have that shaggy dog look too its because we're all too used to seeing them in a breed clip. Originally poodles were meant to have longer coats because they were hunting dogs and spent a lot of time in the water ... you can even do this with a poodle

    545_book_final_cover_joe_4_17_2012.jpg

    Poor dog.......looks like a rastafarian poodle.


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  7. #27
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    Some excellent stuff in this thread.

    HOwever, in regards to aesthetics...I go for lookers myself, well its not that I specifically choose a breed for looks (weve only owned x's) but I always take the pup I like th elook of most. I dont really care what the temperament or anything else is. We just adjust. In saying that, weve had a boxer/staffy x and if youve had one of those, you can have pretty much any dog LMAO.

    In saying all that though, my OH has wanted a bulldog for years and I have agreed that that will be our next dog. And, one of the big attractions for us is that it won't need a hell of a lot of exercise.

    So I guess, there needs to be some balance, if you want to go for something you like asthetically, them you may need to be prepared to compromise on some of your other requirements. If youve prefr to meet all your other requirements, then you may have to get over the looks of the dog.

    Good luck though!

  8. #28
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    A friend of mine has a cavalier spaniel and he is both cute and easy care and smart but I guess they shed?. As to poodles, you certainly dont have to shave their faces. We had a very pretty poodle once and kept her with a puppy clip. She was pretty active though and I think she would have gone nuts if we only exercised her every 2 days.

    A good ball throw every day did the trick.

    Yes getting a dog that comes from parents tested for the genetic diseases common to their breed is essential. I have had one friend had to euthanaise her young designer cross dog to severe hip dysplasia and another lost theirs to early onset PRA, the dog went blind at a young age. Not nice.

    My mother has a poodle,lab, maltese mix and her coat is a lot harder to deal with than our poodles ever was. It doesnt shed but it tangles and matts easily and picks up dirt like you wouldnt believe. The only way to deal with it is to keep her clipped short.

    I also have a friend with a spoodle and really I thought it was a poodle when I first met him. I would never have guessed he had spaniel in him. He had the same puppy clip as our poodle. You can clip a dog anyway you want, just because it is a poodle doesnt mean it face has to be shaved.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 08-13-2012 at 08:53 AM.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    The photos are all of pedigree poodles except the last one which is an actual cocker x poodle. See poodles can have that shaggy dog look too its because we're all too used to seeing them in a breed clip. Originally poodles were meant to have longer coats because they were hunting dogs and spent a lot of time in the water ... you can even do this with a poodle

    545_book_final_cover_joe_4_17_2012.jpg
    Whoopi Goldberg?

  10. #30

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    Thank you again, everyone for all of your advice.

    The thread has been informative, and very helpful. I hope it helps others in a similar situation.

    We have found some spoodles, and I have taken the advice to check genetic testing, ensuring non-cage breeders/puppy farms and are hopeful to have a good puppy experience. I appreciate that this is taking a risk, but we are doing it with our eyes open. I fully respect those who believe one should never buy a spoodle, but hope you will forgive us for giving in to what seems like an ideal dog for what we are wanting.

    Thank you again so very much,

    Paul

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