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Thread: A purebred alternative to a spoodle?

  1. #11

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    Thanks so much for the suggestions so far, everyone! I really appreciate it.

    We love the look of the Lagotto, however price may be an impediment (averaging $1500!).

    The Tibetan Spaniel and Terrier are not what we are looking for aesthetically. I'm going to have trouble convincing the Fiancee about a poodle (that they don't have to have their faces shaved etc).

    If we do go for a Spoodle, I will be endeavoring to find one from a breeder that treats the dogs well, and screens for health issues in the parents (although I 'm not sure how to do this - if anyone knows an ethical spoodle breeder, I'd love to hear from you!)

    Any further suggestions are welcome, along with thoughts on the breeds already mentioned.

    Thanks so much everyone,

    Paul

  2. #12
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    Looks alone are not what I pick a breed by, living with a dog is all about picking a breed whose requirements we can meet - training and exercise.

    Spaniels x poodles are not cheap to buy and the cost of a dog is often the cheapest part of dog ownership.

    Most spoodles are NOT non-shedding and the coat requires good upkeep as the two different coats work against each other.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    And I also wanted to add that everyone likes the idea of an intelligent dog, but they are usually harder work. My last dog wasn't particularly smart, but she was extremely loyal and wasn't very creative when it came to alleviating boredom, which I thought was a definite bonus. My current dog likes to show off her smarts. Like when I got a new tub with lid to keep our shoes away from her and found all our footwear at the front door when I came home the first day I used it. Cute, but also highly annoying.
    THIS... One of mine is as smart as a whip... Unfortunately this means she knows that when I call her inside for barking it means she doesn't have to come... She knows she can keep doing it because I will come out and get her. It also means she can figure things out such as how to open the garbage bin.
    My other poodle is as dumb as a box of rocks... However, he is the most obedient dog I have ever owned and very loyal and loving. I find the dumber they are, the better they behave. Lesser intelligence doesn't mean not able to do tricks, quite the opposite actually, the "dumb" dog will follow commands without question, the smart dog will try and find a way out of doing it.

    As for price, you can expect to pay around $1,000 for a well bred dog of almost any breed. Some charge much less, others charge a little more depending on the breeding and cost to the breeder, but I would be wary of buying a 'cheap' dog.

    The last dog I bought cost me $1800 and I couldn't be happier, the only trips to the vet he has had is for vaccinations. $1800 really isn't much when you consider you will own the dog for anywhere from 10 to 15 years.

  4. #14
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    Never a truer word spoken Crested. When I married into a ready made family I felt I no longer had the time for my beloved Kelpie so as they passed on I didn't replace them. I went looking for a low maintence breed in all aspects. My husband had his heart set on a Gordon and I relented; I couldn't convince him of the Whippet, it was the skinny thing that he couldn't get past. Fine I said but the Gordon is yours not mine.

    While not requiring as much as the Kelpie to keep her occupied and in tip top condition she wasn't far behind. But hubby certainly agreed she would be our one and only and I got my Whippet and now we have several.

    When it came to who I used for my practical exams for my Cert III it wasn't the Gordon, but the Whippet. She was happy to follow instructions, was not trying to think 10 steps in front of me. They pretty much have been no trouble, while she, while loveable and full of personality has always tested us.

    I love any and all dogs, and Gemma gets as much if not more attention than any of the sighthounds, but I'm realistic in what I want in a dog and what I expect of myself and the family.

    I think if most people who were looking at getting a dog set out a plan of how much time & energy they are willing to put into a dog then cut that in half they would be closer to the truth. (with the exception of the totally dog crazy people on here).
    Last edited by MAC; 08-07-2012 at 01:29 PM.

  5. #15
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    I can tell you at least with a purebred you have a better chance of getting a pup with the personality you want. Purebreeds are there to breed consistency. Cross two totally different breeds together and start playing pot luck, I have seen spoodles that are very snappy and just plain nervy dogs (two actually, both bit the owners very hard) Genetically the puppies also have only a 25% chance of being mostly non shedding. Now that means the hair that falls out stays in the coat, not on your carpet hence more grooming. The crosses are also a little more difficult to groom as they tend to have a mixed coat instead of a standardised all over one and usually need more time grooming, or at least a few professional once all overs every year.

    As for looks, pick which is the poodle and which is the cross

    Paris_Poodles_Madeline_sit-335x347_1_.jpg

    Toy_Poodle_by_DigiPhotography.jpg

    coffee_poodle03.jpg

    ToyPoodleBradyPuppy8WeeksOld.jpg

    crumpet-the-poodle-mix-4_55354_2011-02-15_w450.jpg

  6. #16
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    I just read a really sad story about some people who got a puppy from a breeder who had done no dna checks before choosing which dogs to mate - and their puppy had a degenerative genetic disease that is always fatal - dead within a month. And of a slow creeping paralysis.

    So you really really (please be careful) want to meet the parent dogs, and check what genetic problems that breed is prone to and make sure that the breeder has documentation of the testing they've done to make sure their chosen pairing will have a litter of puppies with the smallest chance (no chance is good) of these problems.

    If you want some independent though largely american data on what breeds are prone to what (and their crosses would have the same vulnerabilites), there is this database
    LIDA Dogs - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nekhbet View Post
    I can tell you at least with a purebred you have a better chance of getting a pup with the personality you want. Purebreeds are there to breed consistency. Cross two totally different breeds together and start playing pot luck, I have seen spoodles that are very snappy and just plain nervy dogs (two actually, both bit the owners very hard) Genetically the puppies also have only a 25% chance of being mostly non shedding. Now that means the hair that falls out stays in the coat, not on your carpet hence more grooming. The crosses are also a little more difficult to groom as they tend to have a mixed coat instead of a standardised all over one and usually need more time grooming, or at least a few professional once all overs every year.

    As for looks, pick which is the poodle and which is the cross

    Paris_Poodles_Madeline_sit-335x347_1_.jpg

    Toy_Poodle_by_DigiPhotography.jpg

    coffee_poodle03.jpg

    ToyPoodleBradyPuppy8WeeksOld.jpg

    crumpet-the-poodle-mix-4_55354_2011-02-15_w450.jpg
    All Poodles?

  8. #18
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    I also think that choosing a dog is always going to be a compromise. Most people would like a dog that never needs walking (but also likes going for walks), toilet trains itself, understands English perfectly, never sheds a hair, never growls or bites and looks exactly like the picture each of us sees in our minds when we hear the word "dog".

    Of course our priorities in what we want in a dog will be different for everyone, but try to make them realistic. Could you live with the dog not being your absolute favourite shape or colour in return for getting a dog that does not require much exercise, is easy to train and has a naturally friendly temperament for example.

    Now I know some people have picked their dogs based purely on looks and have just adapted to whatever temperament they turned out to have. I've done it myself actually! But that is why I had a list of criteria when I picked my next dog and looks were way down the list. Never regretted it. Even though I still look at her and think she is so far from "my type of dog" in the looks department it is funny. But she has been a joy to train and live with.

  9. #19
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    Lol at Beloz

    I picked the friendly dog from an ACDx litter at AWL... her sister was prettier but didn't want to know me.

  10. #20
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    I just think it is a funny question...a purebred alternative to a spoodle, to me would to buy a poodle.

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