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Thread: Driving While on the Mobile

  1. #1

    Default Driving While on the Mobile

    This I have to say is one of my very best pet hates.
    One time I was with my son he was driving and he got a message. he went to reply to it, when I stepped in and said to him he is not going to do that while I am in the car with him. He put the phone down and I was happy.
    My son now is a cop in South Australia.

    Where we actually live is 9 kilometers or so from Mildura and when we go into town I can almost bet that we see 3 people on the phone or texting while driving, on average.

    And being honest, I myself can not see why talking on the phone is so wrong, as to me it is like talking to the passanger.
    They done test to say that it is dangerous to talk while on the phone.

    On these test they ask stupid questions, that your friend wouldn't ask, like divide 140 by 5. Now come on, who is going to ask something like that. At best it might be what are we going to have for tea and could you pick it up, or something simple like that.
    This could not take your attention away from driving. But it is against the law to do so. And we all know it but we see so many still attached to their phones.

    Texting is a way different story. This is just plainly stupid to do. And anyone caught doing it should be fined. There is no way that you can do that and drive safely. Try it just the one time go to an industrial area or out of town where you know it is safer to try this and see how you go.

    This is my gripe for the week.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I drive almost 200kms a day, 5 days a week, to get to work and back. I can tell a mile off when the car in front of me is being driven by someone who is distracted by their mobile!

    They don't keep to an even speed, always slowing down then realisng and speeding up or speeding up and realising then slowing down. They weave all over the road. It is blatantly obvious to me that mobiles are definitely a distraction!
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  3. #3
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    I wish people wouldn't talk to their passengers either. So many do it and have to look at the passenger too. And then they go slowly and weave across the lanes.

    Some people do this when talking hands free on their phones as well.

    It has to do with talking on the phone interfers with the part of the brain used for driving. Not just the looking away from the road, so there are a significant number of car accidents connected to use of the mobile phone. Just like there are a significant number of accidents associated with fatigue and drink driving and speeding.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I drive almost 200kms a day, 5 days a week, to get to work and back. I can tell a mile off when the car in front of me is being driven by someone who is distracted by their mobile!

    They don't keep to an even speed, always slowing down then realisng and speeding up or speeding up and realising then slowing down. They weave all over the road. It is blatantly obvious to me that mobiles are definitely a distraction!
    Hear, hear!

    I'm not sure what I think about handsfree phones. I suppose a call is different than talking to a passenger in that you would more easily ask a passenger to hold on a minute while you negotiate a tricky traffic situation for example. I often tell my daughter to wait when I need to cross a busy intersection for example because I just cannot concentrate on what she is saying and traffic and driving at the same time. You don't normally let someone wait on the phone - you keep the conversation going no matter what.

    And then I see so many people use phones without a handsfree. Often I see them pull out of a carpark or a driveway whilst on the phone! What could possibly be so urgent that they could not wait 1 minute before driving off?

  5. #5
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    One of the rules I have had upon my nephew is not to be in the car with more than 3 passengers that his friend drives.

    Despite of advanced mobile technology, i am against using mobile in the car.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  6. #6

    Default

    I have even heard that they are going to look at the GPS's now, as they are taking the attention away from driving.
    But just a short question why are the cops allowed to talk an their 2 ways while driving, isn't it sort of the same thing.
    By the way my son is a cop so I'm not havubf a free plug at them.

  7. #7
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    why are the cops allowed to talk an their 2 ways while driving
    Haven't seen one doing that for a long time. Much more likely to see one using a mobile phone - though usually parked.

    Truck drivers and people like me have CBs as well. I only have the CB turned on if I'm jammed in traffic and want to know why or I'm on the country roads. In the city it's usually a complete waste of time. Too many idiots talking about nothing useful at once.

    So I would imagine there are far fewer accidents directly connected to use of CB than to mobile phones. It is quite easy to operate a CB without looking at it, and the handset usually only has one button which is big and easy to use.

  8. #8
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    When I visited Europe last April to visit my relatives, I was so impressed with my oldest sister's car and her built-in GPS. It doesn't just calculate the shortest route, it will warn you in real time when there is a traffic jam ahead, inform you what the delay is likely to be, calculate an alternative route, inform you how much time the latter would add to your trip and then lets you make a choice if you want to stay on course or go the alternative. All very cool, but it does demand your attention and for you to push a button on command. Fortunately I had no issue with my oldest sister doing this as I discovered she is one of the best drivers I've ever known. I even felt safe with her driving through Paris!

    If my younger sister would've been fiddling with controls like that I would've been very worried though as she is a very distracted driver even without distractions!

  9. #9

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    Ann were about are you in the country and were do you work
    If you are reading this then you're doing just fine as to
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    No grammar no problem I don't know how to fly it any way Bye

  10. #10
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    Kass, I live on the south coast (Kiama) and work in Sydney.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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