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Thread: Cattle Outcry-copy from SAY NO TO ANIMAL CRUELTY

  1. #1
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    Angry Cattle Outcry-copy from SAY NO TO ANIMAL CRUELTY-Caution, footage of torture/animals

    SAY NO TO ANIMAL CRUELTY WORLD WIDE | causes.com Members in SAY NO TO ANIMAL CRUELTY WORLD WIDE To: Members in SAY NO TO ANIMAL CRUELTY WORLD WIDE
    Doco reveals Australian cattle tortured overseas
    Horrific footage from inside Indonesian abattoirs that use Australian cattle has revealed abuse of the animals is widespread. As a Australian I am appauled to the treatment of animals in overseas Slaughter houses this should be banned and all cattle be treated humainly and put to sleep before being butchered this process should be done in Australia the cattle should not be sent Alive in ships in un humane condtions. Footage on ABC1's Four Corners tonight shows animals kicked, thrashed and beaten, their throats hacked at, eyes gouged and tails broken. According to analysis of the footage by RSPCA chief scientist Bidda Jones, some animals show signs of possible consciousness when they are dismembered. In March this year, animal welfare campaigners Animals Australia filmed in 11 randomly chosen abattoirs in Indonesia and provided the footage to Four Corners.

    More than a month later, a Four Corners team went to Indonesia and filmed in abattoirs where cattle suffered prolonged and painful deaths.

    Animals Australia spokeswoman Lyn White brought Egypt's live export trade to a halt in 2006 after exposing animal cruelty in Cairo.

    She says her suspicions were raised after the live export industry released a report in January describing animal welfare in Indonesia as generally good.

    "We had assumed that because there were greater level of industry involvement in Indonesia, the treatment of the livestock would have been better," she said.

    "But we couldn't have been more wrong."

    The abattoirs featured on Four Corners are well-known to the Australian industry, which has installed equipment and provided training in Indonesian abattoirs to help with the handling of Australian cattle since 2000.

    The live export industry was shown the vision from four Indonesian abattoirs prior to an interview.

    LiveCorp CEO Cameron Hall described the scenes as "graphic and disturbing", and announced the suspension of the supply of Australian cattle to three of the four abattoirs.

    The fourth abattoir, Gondrong in Jakarta, was the scene of sustained suffering by Australian animals.

    When asked why Gondrong is continuing to process Australian cattle, Mr Hall says training can address the issues.

    A statement released by industry last week said: "A team of Australian cattle experts will fly to Indonesia this weekend to deliver this training to priority facilities, including this facility."

    But Four Corners has revealed the facility has already been visited six times by industry representatives in the past 14 months.

    There are 100 abattoirs in Indonesia that slaughter Australian animals. Since the trade began 20 years ago, more than 6.5 million cattle have been shipped to Indonesia for slaughter.


    Big bucks and metal boxes

    Indonesia is Australia's key market for live cattle exports, taking 60 per cent of all cattle, and in 2010, the trade was worth more than $300 million.

    The Australian livestock export industry and the Australian Government have invested more than $4 million into improving animal welfare in Indonesia over the past 10 years.

    The majority of funding has been invested into Australian-designed metal restraining boxes.

    The RSPCA says the boxes are inadequate and stunning the animal prior to slaughter is the only humane option.

    There are currently only six Indonesian abattoirs that use stunning.

    Last week the industry launched its welfare action plan, which included providing stunning equipment to five additional abattoirs by the end of this year.

    The new plan also says from 2015, Australian livestock will only be supplied to facilities who meet the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) standards.

    But Indonesia is already a signatory to the OIE.

    Animals Australia spokeswoman Glenys Oogjes says Australia has no power to make Indonesia comply with these guidelines.

    "The OIE guidelines are minimal standards for developing countries that allow practices that are illegal in Australia to take place," she said.

    Agriculture Minister Joe Ludwig said in budget estimates last week that he had been concerned about the live animal trade for some time and criticised the industry for being too slow in addressing welfare concerns.

    But in April, during a speech to the Northern Territory Cattleman's Association in Darwin, he reiterated the Australian Government's continued support of the live export trade.




    Call to Action
    Photo: http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/201105/r775575_6634304.jpg
    Doco reveals Australian cattle tortured overseas
    Horrific footage from inside Indonesian abattoirs that use Australian cattle has revealed abuse of the animals is widespread. As a Australian I am appauled to the treatment of animals in overseas Slaughter houses this should be banned and all cattle be treated humanely and put to sleep before being butchered this process should be done in Australia the cattle should not be sent Alive in ships in un humane condtions. Footage on ABC1's Four Corners tonight shows animals kicked, thrashed and beaten, their throats hacked at, eyes gouged and tails broken. According to analysis of the footage by RSPCA chief scientist Bidda Jones, some animals show signs of possible consciousness when they are dismembered. In March this year, animal welfare campaigners Animals Australia filmed in 11 randomly chosen abattoirs in Indonesia and provided the footage to Four Corners.

    More than a month later, a Four Corners team went to Indonesia and filmed in abattoirs where cattle suffered prolonged and painful deaths.

    Animals Australia spokeswoman Lyn White brought Egypt's live export trade to a halt in 2006 after exposing animal cruelty in Cairo.

    She says her suspicions were raised after the live export industry released a report in January describing animal welfare in Indonesia as generally good.

    "We had assumed that because there were greater level of industry involvement in Indonesia, the treatment of the livestock would have been better," she said.

    "But we couldn't have been more wrong."

    The abattoirs featured on Four Corners are well-known to the Australian industry, which has installed equipment and provided training in Indonesian abattoirs to help with the handling of Australian cattle since 2000.

    The live export industry was shown the vision from four Indonesian abattoirs prior to an interview.

    LiveCorp CEO Cameron Hall described the scenes as "graphic and disturbing", and announced the suspension of the supply of Australian cattle to three of the four abattoirs.

    The fourth abattoir, Gondrong in Jakarta, was the scene of sustained suffering by Australian animals.

    When asked why Gondrong is continuing to process Australian cattle, Mr Hall says training can address the issues.

    A statement released by industry last week said: "A team of Australian cattle experts will fly to Indonesia this weekend to deliver this training to priority facilities, including this facility."

    But Four Corners has revealed the facility has already been visited six times by industry representatives in the past 14 months.

    There are 100 abattoirs in Indonesia that slaughter Australian animals. Since the trade began 20 years ago, more than 6.5 million cattle have been shipped to Indonesia for slaughter.


    Big bucks and metal boxes

    Indonesia is Australia's key market for live cattle exports, taking 60 per cent of all cattle, and in 2010, the trade was worth more than $300 million.

    The Australian livestock export industry and the Australian Government have invested more than $4 million into improving animal welfare in Indonesia over the past 10 years.

    The majority of funding has been invested into Australian-designed metal restraining boxes.

    The RSPCA says the boxes are inadequate and stunning the animal prior to slaughter is the only humane option.

    There are currently only six Indonesian abattoirs that use stunning.

    Last week the industry launched its welfare action plan, which included providing stunning equipment to five additional abattoirs by the end of this year.

    The new plan also says from 2015, Australian livestock will only be supplied to facilities who meet the OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) standards.

    But Indonesia is already a signatory to the OIE.

    Animals Australia spokeswoman Glenys Oogjes says Australia has no power to make Indonesia comply with these guidelines.

    "The OIE guidelines are minimal standards for developing countries that allow practices that are illegal in Australia to take place," she said.

    Agriculture Minister Joe Ludwig said in budget estimates last week that he had been concerned about the live animal trade for some time and criticised the industry for being too slow in addressing welfare concerns.

    But in April, during a speech to the Northern Territory Cattleman's Association in Darwin, he reiterated the Australian Government's continued support of the live export trade.




    Call to Action
    Photo: http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/201105/r775575_6634304.jpg
    Last edited by Dakota_Chey; 06-02-2011 at 10:03 AM. Reason: link
    Ho'neene'šeohtseva'e

  2. #2

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    There has been a bill submitted to end live export.

    Facebook group is here: Urge Your MP to Support the Bill to End Live Export | Facebook

    There are links the local and state Governments and there's even a pre-typed letter you can just copy and paste to as many Government leaders as you can.

  3. #3
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    Exclamation Immoral

    For anyone wanting the links there are many sites now in petition mode. The rspca has joined forces with a very active organisation. Most people by now would have heard of or viewed the footage of 'Brians story'. The link that I present here is about a number of Australian Cattle and is narrated by two women who have blown the whistle, so to speak.

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/24323145?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;a utoplay=0" width="450" height="270" frameborder="0"></iframe><br /><a href='http://www.BanLiveExport.com/'>For Arthur's sake, BanLiveExport.com</a>

    Four Corners Live export expose damning | Animals Australia

    Most would avoid watching this through as it has the capacity to engage the mind in providing the most thought provoking and soul searching material that one may ever in a lifetime have witnessed. The story of five- all given names by the narrators should be the very source of the prevention of this bullying, barbarianism, malevolent torturing, sadistic tormenting and abuse on every level ever witnessed.

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/24323145?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0&amp;a utoplay=0" width="450" height="270" frameborder="0"></iframe><br /><a href='http://www.BanLiveExport.com/'>For Arthur's sake, BanLiveExport.com</a>
    Ho'neene'šeohtseva'e

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    An update - live exports to Indonesia are now temporarily banned. So a small win for us all.

    http://www.smh.com.au/environment/an...607-1fr8b.html


    THE federal government has decided to suspend the export of all live cattle to Indonesia, following a public outcry and a threatened backbench revolt.

    The Agriculture Minister, Joe Ludwig, signed the order last night and said the ban would stay in place until safeguards had been adopted that would ensure the proper treatment of the beasts along the whole supply chain.

    The decision to suspend the $318 million-a-year-industry was taken by cabinet on Monday night and has the potential to upset the Indonesians, the cattle industry and the federal opposition, all of which have argued against a blanket ban.

    The Prime Minster, Julia Gillard, said the government would work with the Indonesians and the cattle industry to ''bring about major change'' to the handling of cattle in Indonesian slaughterhouses.

    Ms Gillard met industry representatives in Darwin last night.

    Industry suspicions of a total ban grew late yesterday when a shipment of 1900 cattle bound for Indonesia was stopped from loading at Port Hedland, Western Australia.

    No-one was able to get a straight answer from the government about the reason for the suspension but the Cattle Council of Australia's executive director, David Inall, suspected a total ban was about to be announced.

    He warned this would limit Australia's ability to stay in the Indonesian market and improve the standard of its abattoirs.

    The ban is the first such move since the Howard government suspended sending live sheep to Egypt in February 2006 following television footage showing mistreatment of the animals.

    The outcry leading to the suspension of cattle exports to Indonesia began on Monday last week when the ABC's Four Corners broadcast footage showing brutal slaughtering methods and mistreatment inside Indonesian abattoirs.

    Initially, Senator Ludwig proposed an inquiry but such was the fury among the Labor backbench that he suspended the export of cattle to 12 offending abattoirs and commissioned an independent review.

    The independents Andrew Wilkie and Nick Xenophon, animal rights activists and others kept demanding a total suspension and on Tuesday next week, the caucus was set to pass a motion backing a complete moratorium.

    On Monday, the cattle industry apologised and fought for a compromise. It proposed banning exports to all but 25 of the more than 100 Indonesian abattoirs that took Australian cattle, and offered to place inspectors in each.

    Senator Ludwig said last night the independent review would help inform the process of adopting new safeguards which ''will ensure the long-term sustainability of the industry while ensuring live cattle exported from Australia are treated humanely''.

    ''I know this decision will impact on the industry but a sustainable live cattle export industry must be built on the ability to safeguard the welfare of the animals,'' he said.

    The decision heads off a fight with the backbench but is likely to anger Indonesia, which relies on Australian beef for 25 per cent of its beef supply and may suffer sharp rises in prices ahead of Ramadan next month.

    ''The Indonesians won't like it,'' said Bruce Warren, who operates a state-of-the-art feedlot and abattoir in Java.

    ''If the trade stops, it will be hard to start again … The Indonesian government is already talking about this in terms of an opportunity for self-sufficiency.''

    But, even as the ban is introduced, there are about 100,000 Australian cattle in Indonesia being fattened before slaughter.

    It is inevitable some will end up in abattoirs that are substandard and prone to use cruel techniques to kill the beasts.

    A recent audit by the government and Meat & Livestock Australia inspectors found more than three-quarters of the abattoirs in Indonesia that process Australian cattle don't adhere to world standards for animal welfare and only a handful are modern ''world class'' facilities.

    ''The concern is that there will be a period where these cattle will be showing up at abattoirs that are outside our control,'' said Mr Warren.

    The exports to Indonesia account for almost half the annual $753 million made from live cattle exports annually.
    Last edited by Anne; 06-08-2011 at 08:40 AM.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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    I feel for the cattle farmers whose stock will not be purchased though now. It may mean they will come under some financial pressure.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    I feel for the cattle farmers whose stock will not be purchased though now. It may mean they will come under some financial pressure.
    If that is all they are thinking about and not the welfare of their animals why do you feel for them????

    I thought when you are involved in any type of breeding ( including the breeding of "meat) the animals welfare should come first??

    so maybe it just is all about revenue then.

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    The cattle farmers are not responsible for the end result though. They are victims of another's abuse. How far can a person take 'responsibility'.

    Do you take responsibility for the food that you eat? It is highly likely, as I pointed out before, that you eat food from animals that have been abused in Australia. Chooks and pigs particularly are not treated exactly humanely in Australia. Should you suffer financially, or in any other way, because of this? (Note - when I say 'you' I am not referring personally to you, but as in 'everyone')
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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    This is how we farm pigs in some areas of Australia;
    Behind 60 Minutes: The Hidden Truth // Animals Australia

    So, how many of us eat pork or buy pigs ears and trotters for our dogs?
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #10
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    HUH???

    Your original post was stating that you feel for them BECAUSE they have temperarily banned the export overseas.

    All I was saying is that, THEY should be relieved that the animals despite their intended fate (to be eaten) will not be tortured and tormented anymore.

    Yes they will suffer financial difficulty in this result but shouldnt they be thinking of the animals welfare first not their pocket or are the cattle just money to them.

    anyway, this is one debate that has already gone on in another thread for way too long, so this is the extent i wanna go into this one as it can easily get out of hand.


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