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Thread: Great Read on the Change in Riding Frame Over Time.

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    Default Great Read on the Change in Riding Frame Over Time.

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    Is interesting but I'm still waiting for them to allow a horse to see where he's going. Eg the carriage of the head with the nose pointing at the ground - blinds the horse. Where as a normal horse will run with his head up so he can see how he's going.

    They've only known about how horses see for a relatively short time, I suppose. My horse taught me the second I started riding him. And I've seen quite a few horses on or under the bit ride into things - big things - like trees.

    Look at the way racehorses hold their heads. It's a more natural position.

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    For sure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Is interesting but I'm still waiting for them to allow a horse to see where he's going. Eg the carriage of the head with the nose pointing at the ground - blinds the horse. Where as a normal horse will run with his head up so he can see how he's going.

    They've only known about how horses see for a relatively short time, I suppose. My horse taught me the second I started riding him. And I've seen quite a few horses on or under the bit ride into things - big things - like trees.

    Look at the way racehorses hold their heads. It's a more natural position.
    Hyac, a horse that has his noes pointing to the ground, is in frame. The poll should be the highest point of the horse, and its face should be vertical. This means the horse is in the greatest form of bit contact, and can react with less pull and tug. A slight finger twitch and the horse will feel the pressure. Have you ever watched dressage? You can barely tell they're even communicating with the horse.
    In the wild, horses hollow their back, throw their head high in the air and pull themself along with their forelegs, rather than push from behind.
    Throw a saddle and person ontop, and it puts huge amounts of pressure on their bones and muscles.
    Racehorses ride like that because trainers don't care if they're in frame they just want them to run. My thoroughbred rides like this, and has hurt his back enough to need a couple of chiro sessions.
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    Maybe I should have read the article first

    I don't agree with what she's written though. Horses are increasingly being ridden behind the verticle with their third vertabrae the highest point, and if they are, its still considered wrong.
    Horse and rider are still being taught to carry themself like in the photo of 1972, as my last post proved.
    Her diagrams give a wrong image. Its should be seen as their back being a bridge. Raised in the middle, and lowered on either side.

    Easy to understand here;
    http://www.classicaldressage.net/mem...n_the_bit.html
    Last edited by aussiemyf7; 01-15-2011 at 05:21 PM.
    Education not Legislation

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    I agree with you Myf I should have read Hyacith post better I thought she was talking about overbent horse that can not see where they are going properly.
    I think it has changed but not quite for the reasons others seem to........
    I also think alot of so called collected riding is way behind the vertical............
    I am not a huge dressage fan or against it either but used to compete & just found the inconsistancy with scores & what is the right way & what isn't seems to vary from 1 trainer & clinic to the next.
    We ride horses in an open easy frame with poll only just higher than wither & we have no gadgets just the very basics of bridle(snaffle or hackamore) & saddle theres days. I have to say my horses are happier for it & if I so wish I can still do a very well put together figure of eight & some 2 time changes but thats about as far as I ever feel like going these days. Usally do it when looking to get a horses mind switched on before whatever new training I may be about to do.
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    This is a better way of imagining a round horse powering from the back. Instead of throwing all their energy through the front, that have more control, and can use it more efficiently. Its hard for a horse to begin with, because they have no idea how to use the energy properly, and the muscles they don't usually use are needed.

    Horse that are behind the vertical are usually seeking the bit contact, but are still pulling from the front. As for the Olympian in the photo from 2000, I don't think that horse is in a 4 beat trot, I think its in an extended canter.
    Im not a huge dressage fan either, but a horse in frame improves all aspects of riding. For example, me and Wiley are jumpers, so If I can get him seeking bit contact and pushing from behind, it will give him more power and he'll be more bascule.
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    I agree that a good frame helps any riding.
    I don't get with the above pic where the energy starts, if you know what I mean??
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    I know what you mean Its more the impulsion within the horse.
    The energy comes up through the body and out through the legs. I didn't really agree with the other diagram cause well, when I see photos like that, its like the energy comes from the back and just gets shot out the front. Whereas this shows the energy being contained and used more efficiently.
    But maybe thats just me
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    I love this man as an example of great classical riding........

    YouTube - Mestre Nuno Oliveira

    Some of the clips are hard to see clearly, but we have watched video of him, where ha actually had the horse in frame and quietly dropped the reins and the horse stayed in frame. Absolutely beautiful.......

    We train horses her, hubby does, but He like to keep them initially totally relaxed and find their own position. we have one now, who will do a Piaffe without a bridle and in frame. But ours all start free and open, Mike actually like to ride a lot in the arena without a bridle, for them to "find" their frame, without his interference.
    But you also have to take the horses conformation into this. Some horses would be unable to breathe properly if they were asked to produce the frame a lot of people like. I just like a horse to work from the hindquarter and not be heavy on the front-end.
    Some horses just flow into the frame that everyone like to see in the Dressage horse, some were never meant to be there and are forced there and end up behind the bit, heavy on the forehand and often distressed.
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