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Thread: Trying to Live a More "natural" Life..

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    This is one of the toilet cleaning tips...

    start with a freshly flushed toilet. Scoop all the water out of the bowl with a paper or plastic cup (so you don't chip anything) - I actually use the dunny brush to push most of it down the s bend...
    Hmmm .... interesting. I use the "vigorous motion brush method" to get the water level down so I can clean the bowl with bicarb & vinegar. I've got stains right on the bottom of the bowl Hy that look .... I was going to say "butt ugly". Apart from buying a new bowl, what do you recommend for removing those stubborn .... *ahem* .... "skid marks" ?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSDs4Ever View Post
    Hmmm .... interesting. I use the "vigorous motion brush method" to get the water level down so I can clean the bowl with bicarb & vinegar. I've got stains right on the bottom of the bowl Hy that look .... I was going to say "butt ugly". Apart from buying a new bowl, what do you recommend for removing those stubborn .... *ahem* .... "skid marks" ?


    I can't stop giggling at this My maturity seems to have gone out the window!

    Part of me now wants to get the bicarb out the cupboard (turns out I actually have some - I've used it for cooking) and spray some vinegar on it to watch it fizz!!

    Would bicarb & vinegar clean my tiled floors? And not leave streaky marks all over them?

  3. #13

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    That's "toilet humour" for you ..... a few "poo" refs & we all revert to giggling, silly children.

    I do want to know what Hy thinks will make my entire bowl all "Sparkly" again though.

    I think the way it works with the bicarb & vinegar is ... the bicarb is an abrasive & the vinegar "reacts" with it when it hits it & that combo is an effective cleaner. I reckon you could put some vinegar in a bottle with a fine spray mist & do the finish off of your tiles that way. I think it should achieve a "streak free" finish that way. It certainly has my stainless steel canopy looking "show room" ready. Give it try & see what happens I suppose ....

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GSDs4Ever View Post
    That's "toilet humour" for you ..... a few "poo" refs & we all revert to giggling, silly children.

    I do want to know what Hy thinks will make my entire bowl all "Sparkly" again though.

    I think the way it works with the bicarb & vinegar is ... the bicarb is an abrasive & the vinegar "reacts" with it when it hits it & that combo is an effective cleaner. I reckon you could put some vinegar in a bottle with a fine spray mist & do the finish off of your tiles that way. I think it should achieve a "streak free" finish that way. It certainly has my stainless steel canopy looking "show room" ready. Give it try & see what happens I suppose ....
    Yep, my spray bottle mix of half water half vinegar makes my s/s stove top look lovely too! And it also makes my black glass coffee table (never again will I have one!) look shiny and streak free - and somehow even stops the dust settling back on it as soon as I've turned my back!!

    I just read on a website that a mix of borax & lemon juice can get rid of stubborn toilet stains...

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie & Bella's mum View Post
    Yep, my spray bottle mix of half water half vinegar makes my s/s stove top look lovely too! And it also makes my black glass coffee table (never again will I have one!) look shiny and streak free - and somehow even stops the dust settling back on it as soon as I've turned my back!!

    I just read on a website that a mix of borax & lemon juice can get rid of stubborn toilet stains...
    So it sounds like that mixture might work for your floor tiles.

    Whew !!! For a second there, I thought I read Borat.

    I wonder what the ingredient/chemical difference between borax & bicarb is ? Does anyone know ?

  6. #16
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    I'm not sure. All the mentions of it also say it's toxic though! TBH i've never even seen it!

  7. #17

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    I know my Gran used it. She was born in the late 1800's (yes, you read that correctly), so it's been around for a million years. I might Google to see what I come up with.

  8. #18

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    Borax
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    For other uses, see Borax (disambiguation).
    "Sodium borate" redirects here. For sodium perborate, see Sodium perborate.
    Borax


    IUPAC name[hide]Sodium tetraborate decahydrate
    Identifiers
    CAS number (anhydrous) 1330-43-4 (anhydrous)
    Identifiers
    CAS number (decahydrate) 1303-96-4 (decahydrate)
    Properties
    Molecular formula Na2B4O7·10H2O or Na2[B4O5(OH)4]·8H2O
    Molar mass 381.37
    Appearance white solid
    Density 1.73 g/cm³ (solid)
    Melting point 743 °C[1]

    Boiling point 1575 °C

    Related compounds
    Other anions Sodium aluminate; sodium gallate
    Other cations Potassium tetraborate
    Related compounds Boric acid, sodium perborate
    Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
    Infobox references

    Old steam tractor and Borax wagons, Death ValleyBorax, also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate, or disodium tetraborate, is an important boron compound, a mineral, and a salt of boric acid. It is usually a white powder consisting of soft colorless crystals that dissolve easily in water.

    Borax has a wide variety of uses. It is a component of many detergents, cosmetics, and enamel glazes. It is also used to make buffer solutions in biochemistry, as a fire retardant, as an anti-fungal compound for fiberglass, as an insecticide, as a flux in metallurgy, a texturing agent in cooking, and as a precursor for other boron compounds.

    The term borax is used for a number of closely related minerals or chemical compounds that differ in their crystal water content, but usually refers to the decahydrate. Commercially sold borax is usually partially dehydrated.

    The word borax is from Persian and originates in the Middle-Persian būrak.

    Sodium bicarbonate
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Sodium Bicarbonate


    IUPAC name[hide]Sodium hydrogen carbonate
    other names[hide]Sodium bicarbonate
    Bicarbonate of soda
    Baking soda
    Sodium hydrogencarbonate
    Nahcolite
    Identifiers
    CAS number 144-55-8 Y
    PubChem 516892
    ChemSpider 8609
    RTECS number VZ0950000
    Properties
    Molecular formula CHNaO3
    Molar mass 84.01 g mol−1
    Appearance white crystalline solid
    Odor odorless
    Density 2.173 g/cm3
    Melting point decomp: 323.15 K (50 °C) - 543.15 K (270 °C)

    Solubility in water 7.8 g/100 mL (18 °C)
    10 g/100 mL (20 °C)
    Solubility insoluble in alcohol, ether
    Acidity (pKa) 10.3
    Refractive index (nD) 1.3344
    Hazards
    MSDS External MSDS
    EU Index Not listed
    NFPA 704 010
    Flash point Non-flammable
    LD50 4220 mg/kg
    Related compounds
    Other anions Sodium carbonate
    Other cations Potassium bicarbonate
    Ammonium bicarbonate
    Related compounds Sodium bisulfate
    Sodium hydrogen phosphate
    Y (what is this?) (verify)
    Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
    Infobox references
    Sodium bicarbonate or sodium hydrogen carbonate is the chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. Sodium bicarbonate is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste resembling that of washing soda (sodium carbonate). It is a component of the mineral natron and is found dissolved in many mineral springs. The natural mineral form is known as nahcolite. It is found in its dissolved form in bile, where it serves to neutralize the acidity of the hydrochloric acid produced by the stomach, and is excreted into the duodenum of the small intestine via the bile duct. It is also produced artificially.

    Since it has long been known and is widely used, the salt has many related names such as baking soda, bread soda, cooking soda, bicarbonate of soda. Colloquially, its name is shortened to sodium bicarb, bicarb soda, or simply bicarb. The word saleratus, from Latin sal æratus meaning "aerated salt", was widely used in the 19th century for both sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate. The term has now fallen out of common usage
    Last edited by GSDs4Ever; 02-20-2010 at 06:43 PM.

  9. #19
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    Toilet bowl + electric polisher. Works a treat. Sparkling clean and oh so white if you use car polish on the electric polisher/buffer. Don't tell anyone though that you do this - trust me, you won't like the way they look at you after!

    C&B, the most natural thing I've found yet in this country is Tassie. Just the air is incredible. My sons and I had a few ailments dissapear quickly after moving here. My mother was also on an oxygen machine in Qld. Had been for a few years. Within a few months of being here, she was off that, and now doesn't even need ashma sprays or anything.

    Buyt I know that's not what you meant. Just chose this opportunity to brag...

  10. #20
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    LOL @ DA - I know I know - we're moving back remember!

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