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Thread: Speech Delays in Children

  1. #1
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    Default Speech Delays in Children

    Just wondering if any parents on here have/had children with speech issues?

    My son is 2 (dec birthday) and only really still babbles. He does understand though, will bring me a cup for a drink or a book to read a toy to play with etc. Has only recently started to point at things (past few months)

    He can say mama and boba (mum and dad) but its a struggle and hardly ever tries. He will walk around saying ba ba ba and da da da mmmm hmmmm ohhhh & wow (babbling).Will wave bye bye understands & whats happening around him.

    I have him booked in for a speech specialist assesment. Just curious to hear other peoples advice/stories.

  2. #2
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    If he's understanding everything then at least you know his hearing is good and it isn't to do with that.

    All kids develop at a different pace, you may find that once he starts getting the hang of words he'll just take off with his vocab.

    Best of luck with the speech specialist appointment. I hope it all goes well.

  3. #3
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    its hard to point at one thing from the little snipit of info that you gave us and without observing him. many many things can cause delays reaching developmental milestones.
    it could be nothing he's just taking his time. or it could be a whole range of developmental disorders that range from extreemly mild to quite a pronounced disorder.

    youve done the right thing in taking him to see a specialist because 1. it will put your mind at rest and 2. it will allow him to get the help he needs (if he needs help)

    good luck!!

    can you keep us updated?

  4. #4
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    I have a good deal of experience with speech impediments and lack of development with my youngest son, Rebec.

    I can't give you much advice, but I can tell you my son's story.

    He was still babbling and close to being totally incoherant at 5. The only person who could understand him was myself and occasionally my mother.
    He was sent to several speech therapists, and another 'specialist' in brain development etc, it just went on and on. Some of their conclusions were given in the most insulting way, which really pissed me off. When he was almost finished his first year at school the specialists assessed him again and informed me he had the learning/speech capabilities of a 2 year old. As he was nearly 6, this wasn't great!

    I did all testing asked of me, I did everything asked of me, then I did the finger at them all and decided that my son would develop in his own sweet bloody time.
    And you know, he did. In the past few years he has caught up so fast that is now no longer under the threshold of the national average, but is sitting in the average and actually achieving well above the national average in a couple of subjects.
    He is never going to be the academic achiever or have the brain my eldest son does, there is no doubt of that, but he has learnt things at HIS pace, HIS way. He doesn't have to be as smart as his brother - he is himself.
    He is now 9, nearly 10, and in all seriousness his speech is 100% coherent, and he has learnt the ability to talk more clearly than a lot of other kids I know his age.

    Wait and see what the speech pathologist reports. Make sure via testing there are no hereditary diseases etc in your bloodline that could be causing this. If there aren't, don't allow ppl and experts to stress you even more - give him his time.

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    DA what a great post!!

    its true dont jump to conclusions but at the same time if you get a diagnosis (from a few specialists) please do not go into denial because early intervention is vital to improving delays and developmental disorders

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    Quote Originally Posted by laura77 View Post
    DA what a great post!!

    its true dont jump to conclusions but at the same time if you get a diagnosis (from a few specialists) please do not go into denial because early intervention is vital to improving delays and developmental disorders
    I agree with that Laura. Imperative to keep an open mind. Pretend it's NOT your child. THEN look at all the information. 30-40 years ago so many children slipped through the system un-noticed and basically came out of school with no education whatsoever. It's very sad.

    I used every day as a lesson, but it was fun for him. If we went shopping, I would ask him to read the labels, read the price tags, read the signs.
    Everywhere we drove, I asked him to tell me what street that was as I pretended I couldn't see the sign properly! Lol. Every meal I would ask him to help me read the instructions on the pasta packet, or cream bottle or whatever I was using to cook with.
    I just made every single moment in his day that I could use a lesson. But I also had a fair gut feeling when his brain was ready to learn, and when it wasn't.

  7. #7
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    Both my nieces have speech problems, I'm only just now starting to understand them and they are 10 and 15. Their mother had speech problems as well as a child.

    I don't know much about it I've never wanted to pry into the story behind it all but I will tell you that it hasn't hindered them in school, and it is improving with age.

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    Here's some info I found:
    If you're concerned about your child's language development, the following skills are what to look out for:

    -no babbling by the end of the first year
    -not able to understand familiar words and phrases by age 12 months
    -no pointing, gestures, or signs by age 12 months
    -not able to follow simple one-step directions without accompanying gestures by age 15 months
    -lack of eye contact
    -no spoken language by age 2

    If your child fits any of these, it's advisable to see a Speech Pathologist.

    Generally 'late-talkers' are those children who have less than 50 words by 2 years. However, many words that a 2-year-old says are not clear and so many words they attempt may not have been considered a real word. It is normal for children under the age of 3 to have very unclear speech.


    Check out this link for more info if you have concerns:
    Speech and language development in infants and young children Caroline Bowen

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    thanks for all your responses

    DA I appreciate you telling your story too thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by laura77 View Post
    DA what a great post!!

    its true dont jump to conclusions but at the same time if you get a diagnosis (from a few specialists) please do not go into denial because early intervention is vital to improving delays and developmental disorders
    I just wanted to second this. A friend of mine was in denial that there was anything different about her son. By the age of 3 he could say large words eg crocodile, dinasaur. But couldn't say small words like mom or dad.

    When she finally got him tested (the lure of money finally made her do it ) she was told he had autism.
    While of cause no ones certain we do believe his development wouldn't have been quite so slow, he came along in leaps and bounds once he started seeing a speech specialist.

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