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Thread: Speech Delays in Children

  1. #11
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    Im am frightened that it will come back to being in the austim sprectrum

    I know I could deal with it but it would just be heartbreaking to know he wouldn't live a ''normal'' life.

  2. #12
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    My other Niece has been diagnosed with....wait, it will come to me..... Sorry will have to look it up, but anyway in lay terms it is one step short of autism and she has no speech problem.

    She is no going to a special life skills school in the sutherland shire. I believe the biggest thing holding her back is her parents. I'm not saying she doesn't have problems but they are not helping.

  3. #13
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    Sorry didn't mean to add to your fear.

    It would depend on where on the scale he was. People with autism can lead normal lives.
    My old next door neighbours son who I think was around 7 was very high functioning, unless someone told you he had autism you wouldn't know.

    With my friends son there were alot of other signs not just the speech. Her close friends and family had guessed he had autism at around 1 year old.

  4. #14
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    are you thinking of aspergers MAC?

  5. #15
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    MY BIL'S ex-wife's children (that was a mouthful) has a child with Aspergers Disease. They have found over the years that the biggest problem in dealing with that disease is not his speech (which isn't too bad) but his behaviour.

    My son's have always had a student in their class throughout their schooling years so far who suffers from Autism. Some of them I will admit have been extreme in my opinion, but were certainly still able to cope in the average 'normal' world.

    I think when we perceive there is a problem Rebec we think of everything it could possibly be. We arm ourselves for the worst, just in case, but more often than not the answer then turns out to be a pleasant surprise. Try not to stress until you have all the answers you need. Hugs to you.

  6. #16
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    Yes thank you was just looking it up. It was on the tip of my tongue.

    She had a very difficult birth etc etc.

    But I firmly believe that while she does have problems her parents are the biggest factor holding her back.

    All the children on my husbands side of the family have problems of one sort or another. It appeared that for a while the only one to not have some problem or another was his daughter but she has now been diagnosed with depression. Terrible when you are only 14.

    His son has a tongue tie which can make him lisp a bit and he has a few learning difficulties.

    As for my other two nieces theirs is obviously inherited from their mother, the two girls got it but not the boy.

  7. #17
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    My 6 yo grandson also has speech problems, I find it hard to understand him at times. He has seen speech pathologists, been tested for everything. He is improving but very slowly. I do not have all the details as his parents are on top of it.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #18
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    not pointing or gesturing (even though it seems like a simple action) is a delay that is commonly seen in autistic spectrum disorders. however dont jump to conclusions get tests done and run from there. the most important thing is you've picked up the issue early so your son has a bright future with you looking out for him like you have!!

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bordeaux View Post
    Sorry didn't mean to add to your fear.

    It would depend on where on the scale he was. People with autism can lead normal lives.
    My old next door neighbours son who I think was around 7 was very high functioning, unless someone told you he had autism you wouldn't know.

    With my friends son there were alot of other signs not just the speech. Her close friends and family had guessed he had autism at around 1 year old.
    true same with me

  10. #20
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    My brother has speech problems when he was younger. He went to speech pathologists because they were worried that his espilesy might be playing apart. Lucky it wasnt. It took him two years to speak normally. This happend when he was 4.

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