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Thread: Any Respite Carers or Similar Here?

  1. #1
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    Default Any Respite Carers or Similar Here?

    Okay, been gone for a few days as have had some important issues to deal with. I am tired, but at least I'm not feeling so cranky now! Lol.

    Following days of talk between my husband, children and I, it has finally been agreed that I will return to the workforce, and their life as they know it MUST change. In other words, they must pull their fingers out their bums and start to do a heck of a lot more around the place instead of leaving it to good old Mum to do everything.

    I am personally very happy with this decision, as having supervised the building of our previous home, then starting the reno's on this one - I am healtily sick of it all. My brain is dying from lack of stimulation, but the main reason is financial.

    So, a job opportunity has arisen for me as a support worker. I have never done this type of work before. All of my employment throughout life has been working with animals as a veterinary nurse, a dog trainer and a grooming salon proprietor. The only other thing I have under my belt over the years is working as a real estate agent, which I simply will not return to.

    Anybody got any comments or advice in relation to this sort of work I'm considering?
    I am of the opinion the hours could be haphazard, and the work could be emotionally draining?

  2. #2
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    What kind of support work are you looking at doing?

    My friend works for the elderly & says that it is very rewarding, you feel good about your day at work, like you have really helped someone. She says the hours are a bit hard (working late etc) & it is upsetting at times (people dying). But she is a hard arse which I think you need to be to get into that line of work.

    I can only imagine how rewarding it would be tho. I have always been interested in being a social worker for the elderly but I just know that I don't have the right emotions to do it.

    www.healthy4paws.com.au
    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face

  3. #3
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    We have respite for mum from Friday afternoon to Saturday morning. The carers come to our house and sleep over. They take mum shopping or to bingo or just out for a drive somewhere.
    They are all wonderful and have wonderful people skills. Not sure about Tassie but up here in Queensland all of them who haven't done any formal training are now doing courses so they can keep their jobs. Most of the carers are very hands on experienced but some are finding the study very hard to keep up with.
    The range of care varies a lot from simply being there, ( like with mum ) to needing help with everything.
    Caring without getting too involved emotionally is probably a skill you have already from your vet nurse days.
    Good luck

  4. #4
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    I only know about respite from the customer point of view...

    We were incredibly grateful for the help we got from the RDNS when Dad was dying of cancer. They came in and washed him and changed the bed sheets and massaged him and helped with the meds - all sorts of nursing stuff that we couldn't do because he was so heavy and hard to manage - and he was not ever fat, just very tall.

    I suppose I did some respite in that I came and sat with Dad so Mum could do something else for a while - though mostly she didn't want to leave but every now and again she had to. Mum used to be a registered nurse so she did most of the caring. I found it very hard but I think it might be easier for someone who wasn't directly connected.

  5. #5
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    Thanks all.

    Emma, you are very correct in regards my ability to switch off emotionally.
    My family have agreed (not sure if I should say thanks or not??? ) that I would be a perfect candidate for issues where a 'hard heart' is needed to do the job.

    Will go over all the paperwork tonight and see what i think about it. According to the job description it does offer ongoing training and the ability to keep learning and gaining more qualifications all the time, which is something that appeals to me greatly.

    Thanks for your input, and thanks Anne for your good wishes.

  6. #6
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    DA, I too can only comment from a customer's POV.

    I nursed Mum around the clock for 8 months, and had a respite carer come in for 4-5 hours once a week so I could have a break (went and did beginners french as I wouldn't have to study, I think I enjoyed our after class lunches more than anything lol). It was wonderful! The lady who came in was great, and for a few hours I could "live in my pretend world" where my real life didn't exist.

    The respite carer told me she found it rewarding, and that she too had to switch off her emotions. The only issue I had with her was that one day she came in wearing perfume which affected mum's breathing so she quickly washed it off!

    That respite care was one of two things that kept me holding on to my sanity at times (the other being my old girl Ammy). I have the utmost admiration for people that can do it. I think with your background you would handle it with great capabilty.

    Go for it!

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

  7. #7
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    Thanks Greys!

    The only problem I have foreseen is the need to do sleep-overs here and there. I have discussed this issue with them (prospective employer, I mean) ans they have stated they would 'do their best' to match me with clients who don't require that.

    I personally would like it if I had to have the occasional sleep-over as it would give me a break also from family.
    My husband is just hopeless with the boys, and no I'm not being rude, he seriously is hopeless! He'll admit it, but at least he is trying to get better. But then again, maybe this would force him to learn how to parent better. Hmmm, food for thought anyway...

  8. #8
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    DA

    Again speaking from experience...

    Dads do not become better parents if you leave them to it. My dad was left alone with us a few times when we were little and um, chaos.

  9. #9
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    My mum worked for Family Based Care for 10 years, caring for the disabled and elderly. She enjoyed it (she's now a nurse at NWPH) but it can be hard - she once had a gentleman die while she was there, and often formed close bonds with her clients and it was always hard on mum when they died.

    The hours were always different day to day (but mostly the same each week, IYKWIM) and the were quite flexible, which always worked out well for us kids...

    good luck with your decision

    PS I don't blame you for not wanting to go back to real estate!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    DA

    Again speaking from experience...

    Dads do not become better parents if you leave them to it.
    My dad was left alone with us a few times when we were little and um, chaos.
    No?

    Oh bugger. Me and my silly wishful thinking. Lol.

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