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Thread: Diabetic Detecting Super Dogs

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Perth, WA
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    Wow, tlc & Anita, that's fantastic!! Good to hear you are able to better manage the diabetes.


    I saw a program on tv ages ago about dogs who can detect cancer. A research centre had people's breath samples - some were up to 5 years old and trained dogs could detect which sample came from the person with lung cancer. Just amazing!! There's more to our doggy friends than meets the eye!

  2. #12
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    Jun 2009
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    Aust.
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    I agree Loren .. amazing creatures of the world. I sometimes wish I could just live a dog's life for one day and see and hear and smell and sense what we as humans can't. The roles pooches play in modern society if just amazing. As Emma pointed out Epilepsy sufferers are also benefiting from the brilliance of our beloved best mates! Thanks all for writing in!

    SH and my Diaby Detecting Sleuths .. Lola n' Zep

  3. #13

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    Wow! SH
    Sorry, i totally missed this...don't visit 'off topic'often.

    I find the subject of dogs trained as medical aids/ being able to detect medical emergencies absolutely facinating.
    I grew up with a girl that had epilepsy, witnessed many fits as a child. Both her lfe, mine, our parents would have been so much less traumatic to have a fury friend looking out for her.
    My mum has diabetes and hypo g is a real worry.
    It's amazing that Zep&Lola react in a hypo g situation. Would love to hear more
    The only thing Misi has done is: not go into my mums bedroom/jump on the bed (which is has always done) when my mum had a broken arm last year after being hit by a car. We were all amazed. She went back to normal after mums plaster cast was removed.
    Great post SH!
    to you, Zep & Loles

  4. #14
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    Oct 2009
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    Rural NSW
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    I have missed this thread. I agree too that these dogs are wonderful and such a great life saving tool.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Aust.
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    Hey Mags and Everyone,

    Yeah well I never had really thought about it too much, I guess because generally when you are having a 'hypo' you don't have your wits about you so things go unnoticed and are always blurred and distorted. But I had thought back to a few times when Lola in particular was fussing about and carrying on (almost a lil distressed). Whilst I can't fully picture it exactly clear in my head, I do recall times when a less severe hypo has happened and she has reacted the same. Zep reacts, but I think his reactions are more inline with Lola's behaviour.

    So yeah, it's very interesting. Not for a second do I think that they are assistance dogs but I do believe that there might be some potential there if they were trained accordingly. Anyways, just one more reason that they are my best mates in the whole world.

    Hope your Mum is ok, I can appreciate the concern people have for hypos - Misi's the best but eh, looking out for her.

    Great to hear from you all,
    SH, Loles n' Zep

  6. #16
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    Nov 2009
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    Numurkah
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    Not detecting diabetics, but my girl, when my husband was diagnosed with cancer late last year, Geisha would get on the bed with him, go up and smell his breath, then settle down and lay beside him all of the time. Now he is in the terminal stage, she seems to know that also. Geisha is very sick also, I give my husband morphine for pain, she gets Metacam, he has a gout medication as an after chemo thing, she has Colchine, a human gout medication, he gets "blocked up", I give him 30 mls. of Duralax, she gets blocked up, she gets 10ml. of the same. Geisha knows he is sick and I really do wonder if this is a lot to do with her illness as well, Amyloidosis (sp). Because she is so lame, she cant get up on the bed with him any more, but occasionally goes in and lays down on the carpet at the foot of the bed.
    Last edited by PeiLuver; 11-08-2009 at 11:12 AM. Reason: Left out one bit.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Aust.
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    Hi Peiluver,

    You are very brave and clearly have a wonderful man and beautiful girl by your side .. I love that you talk so affectionately about them, it is so very touching. Thank you for sharing this story as it helps us to realise just how amazing and incredible the challenges that our friends face every day.

    If there is anything I can do .. please call out. You always have a friend when you need it ...

    Sincerely, SH

  8. #18
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    Nov 2009
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    Numurkah
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    Thank-you SH

  9. #19
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    Mar 2011
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    Brisbae
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    My girlfriend is a Diabetic, she has a Chihuahua and she said to me that he knows when she is bad and runs around her in circles and makes her sit down until the blood sugar is better again .

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    A diabetic's blood sugar won't be sorted by "sitting down", they need to get balanced again either by eating something sweet or getting an appropriate insulin dose.

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