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Thread: Our Puppy Has a Broken Leg??

  1. #1

    Default Our Puppy Has a Broken Leg??

    My partner has recently purchased a puppy rottweiler,

    so the story begins the breeder called use to inform us that the puppy has a broken leg because the mum sat on it.
    so he asked us to meet him at the vet and we could decide whether we will take him or otherwise the breeder had to put him down because he couldnt look after it plus the rest of the puppies!

    so once he said that there was no way we would allow him to be put down,he was then named Boris.
    so the next day we took him to the vet and discovered it was a clean snap which was meant to heal the easiest!

    But no so firstly the vet put a bandage on his leg under anesthetic which cost 1000 dollars, which then the bandage had to be changed every 3-4 days, Boris grows so quick to keep it on any longer.
    so after three very long weeks of caring for Boris with many incidents of him ripping his bandage off. we thought the leg would be better after spending around 2500 in total.

    But no the x-ray showed the bone did not heal so sugery was the next option which we did and another 2000 dollars and 6 pins in his leg.
    and discovering that he also had a chest infection gosh another 5oo dollars!

    so what to do now Boris's leg has a bit of a limp he goes to the vet today! we can not afford another operation and cant support the on going cost if his hips are gone? its been a long 6 weeks owning our first puppy? what would you do?

  2. #2
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    WOW thats a $5000 Rotti, I would wrap him up in cotton wool.....

  3. #3
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    Reads like you picked a really crappy breeder who only cares about money.

    And you should have asked the vet up front - how much this was going to cost? Clean breaks usually do require pins and a splint to heal in an animal that won't sit still or wear a plaster.

    It seems you have bought a live money pit, from a breeder who has not done the necessary tests to ensure the health of the parents before he mated them and hasn't provided a safe environment for the puppies either.

    But when you said you'd take the puppy anyway (I would have said "no" when the breeder rang up, hell, I would not have chosen a breeder without checking they were responsible in the first place), you take on all the responsibility for the puppy care.

    If you don't want to pay any more money - you've got a few choices, get the dog put to sleep, or find it a new home - eg give it to the RSPCA or a Rottie rescue organisation - if they will take it. You may want to ask the vet first if he thinks the dog has a chance of a good quality of life if someone will spend the money on it. If the vet thinks that no matter how much you spend the dog is going to have problems and pain for ever then maybe save everybody some grief and get it put down.

    Rottweiler Rescue South Australia

    Dogs can break legs, have car accidents, get bitten by snakes, or other dogs, or eat something bad - they find many ways to cost owners a lot of money. If you're on a limited budget - you will always need to ask the vet up front how much it's going to cost to get the dog healthy with a good quality of life again and you're always going to need to deal with the PTS if you can't afford it question.

    I got insurance for my dog, but that's no good if you agree to take a puppy that is already broken.

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Your breeder fails to meet the criteria of "responsible breeder" on at least 5 out of 10 criteria, maybe more.

  4. #4
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    I really feel for you. What a crappy breeder - that was outright emotional blackmail! No ethical breeder I know would ever do such a thing. Did the breeder actually have the cheek to charge you for the puppy? Grrrr

    There is one thing that I have learnt - for orthopedic problems bypass the general vet and head straight for the orthovet. It will save you money as it would have done in this case and resulted in a much better outcome. That was just poor advice and you paid for it! You shouldnt be taking bandages on and off - no wonder it didnt knit together. It makes no sense to me.

    Is there some reason that make you think that this dogs hips are going to be a problem? Are his parents hip scored as every Rottie should be before breeding?

    As Hyacinth says, dogs can cost big at any time. You need to consider insurance or put some money aside. With insurance any condition that was diagnosed before you take out insurance is not covered.

    What would I do? I would bypass the incompetent vet and get a ortho consult if you wish to pursue following up on Boris's limp and talk about hips. Then hopefully you will get an accurate picture of what is going on. Then you can make an informed decision.

    Hopefully the chest infection can be dealt with by a course of antibiotics.

    Oh and if that was a registered breeder with the ANKC which sounds unlikely I would send in a written complaint to the ANKC.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-13-2010 at 09:19 PM.

  5. #5
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    Just curious Hyacinth, How can you tell that the breeder is irresponsible from that post? How can you tell that he doesn't care about the welfare and health of the puppy? I'm sorry but making a huge statement like that off one paragraph of material is damaging and presumptuous.

    Accidents happen. Believe it or not a mother sitting on the puppy and breaking something is actually common. It doesn't mean that the breeder doesn't care about the dog.

    She may not have made the choice that you would have but that's not a reason to condemn her for it. She obviously has a big heart to say that she wanted to save the puppy in the first place.

    Back to the problem. Have you considered amputation?? If the leg is having problems healing and will continue to do so then this might be an option. Puppies legs are so hard to heal because they are very mobile and growing so quickly. It might be worth asking the vet about. Given the breed of your dog they may not think it's worth it.
    Good on you for taking on a puppy that otherwise would have had no chance. There should be more people like you in the world.

  6. #6
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    I am with Hyacinth on this one

    I dont think it is the fact the mother sat on the puppy it is the way it was handled. I have a friend who breeds Rotties and if something like that happended to one of her pups she would deal with it herself and not put the onus on the purchaser.

    The breeder had a big heart for the puppy buyers shelling out the money to save the pup. If the breeder truly had a big heart they would have paid for the surgery themselves, got the pup well and then sold it.

    Personally I think it is disgraceful, particularly if the breeder charged for the puppy.

    As I said if they are serious about this pup I can not emphasise enough to get an orthovets opinion.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brydes View Post
    Just curious Hyacinth, How can you tell that the breeder is irresponsible from that post? How can you tell that he doesn't care about the welfare and health of the puppy? I'm sorry but making a huge statement like that off one paragraph of material is damaging and presumptuous.

    snip.
    Brydes

    Did you read the RSPCA link?

    A mother sitting on a puppy happens, I wouldn't say it was common, but it is much more likely with inexperienced breeders or puppy mill farmers who don't house the mother and puppies correctly or lose a lot of sleep making sure nobody gets squished.

    otherwise the breeder had to put him down because he couldnt look after it plus the rest of the puppies!
    This and the choice offered to the puppy buyers (Amanda) is not what responsible breeders do. The suggestion of dodgy hips - would also be the result of dodgy breeding. Good breeders also offer guarantees on their puppies. Ie the breeder should be paying the vet bills not the buyers. Hence my comment about "only cares about money".

    Did you read the same OP as me? Did you read the RSPCA link which included 10 points that responsible breeders comply with? And we don't even know if this is a registered breeder with the ANKC. Registered breeders are supposed to select parents to improve the breed - not breed dogs with dodgy hip scores.

    How humane is it to put a dog through all that surgery and then decide "we can't afford it"? What about not doing enough research before choosing a breeder thereby supporting bad dog breeding practices?

    I can't see how what I've said is damaging - except maybe to Amanda's feelings, the breeder hasn't been identified. Amanda would be hurting already - here's hoping she learns what she needs to know before choosing her next puppy. And it's not presumptous - unless assuming Amanda's story is true - is presumptious. I've made mistakes like that before.

    What I don't understand is why you'd support the breeder or the buyer in this situation?

  8. #8
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    As far as the OP is concerned, I do feel sorry for her. Unfortunately it often takes something like this to happen to learn about what to look for in a good breeder. Unfortunately emotions were played upon and the OP fell into the trap. I am assuming the OP is not an experienced dog owner in this case.

    I made some bad choices of breeders myself early on in my dog owning career and had no idea what the ANKC was or what an ethical breeder was defined by and many people still dont. Had never heard of elbow or hip dysplasia or any of those things. Mind you in those days we didnt have the internet either.

  9. #9

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    All good points however by the time most come here it's too late.
    It's still all about education and most think that BYB or pet shops are the way to go to buy a pup.
    There are dodgy ANKC breeders out there as well.
    However we have a dodgy breeder who shouldn't have put that on the OP, a dodgy vet. and I agree should have been directed straight to an orthopedic vet, a young pup with problems ,bonding with the pup, lots of money spent.
    What would I do. I would have a consult with an ortho vet and go from there. That way you will know what you will be up for financially and most importantly what will be the best outcome for the pup. I would also ring the breeder and ask if hip scores were done.
    Good luck.

  10. #10

    Default Update on Boris

    Hi Everyone,
    thankyou for all the support and advice...well finally we had some good news!
    Boris had his pins taken out on friday and all is well.

    we just need him to build the muscle back on his leg but it looks good, the only thing is that he walks on a bit on an angle but hopefully with time we wont even be able to tell.

    im so happy we have a healthy puppy now

    Thanks again everyone!

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