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Thread: Snake Season ?

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Rural NSW
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    I am going to try clapping if I see one and I am stuck there.
    Sooo, I was on track when one went under the house and I put basey music on the loudest I could and the kids and I jumped around the house?

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #72
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    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Like me banging with the feed buckets...

    Given the snake mostly lived in the left side of the shed with a wall between... and I used the right side of the shed which can't be seen from the left side... I figure the snake knew I was there.

    The brown snakes can't get much height for striking and when they do strike, they usually end up lower than where they started, so gum boots are good, but (not that I'm willing to do the experiment) I reckon knee high ugg boots would work too. And I also used to wear something called "chappettes" which were knee high Velcro on leather for horse riding but really good at keeping prickly plants like triodia / spinifex and fish hook leaf pandanas from ripping me to pieces.

  3. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Like me banging with the feed buckets...

    Given the snake mostly lived in the left side of the shed with a wall between... and I used the right side of the shed which can't be seen from the left side... I figure the snake knew I was there.

    The brown snakes can't get much height for striking and when they do strike, they usually end up lower than where they started, so gum boots are good, but (not that I'm willing to do the experiment) I reckon knee high ugg boots would work too. And I also used to wear something called "chappettes" which were knee high Velcro on leather for horse riding but really good at keeping prickly plants like triodia / spinifex and fish hook leaf pandanas from ripping me to pieces.
    I've never actually encountered a brown snake in the wild, being from tasmania and growing up on a farm I've come across more that my fair share of tigers and copperheads. however, I'm pretty sure I read that browns, because of the way they strike from that S shaped stance can strike significantly higher than most other snakes??? Maybe Snake Catcher can give us the low down, it could well be a case of don't believe everything you read on the internet lol

  4. #74

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    mymatejack, you are more or less on track, but I shall make it simpler for you.
    It all gets down to the laws of physics.
    When all is equal, a snake with an s-position can strike further than one already straightened out.
    As it happens, the longest striking snake in Australia on this basis is a scrub python from North Queensland.
    Here we have pretty much everything, blacks, browns, tigers, taipans, adders, etc, and it is the scrubbies (scrub pythons)
    with by far the longest strike reach.
    Of the venomous snakes, the inland Taipans top the group.
    All the best

  5. #75
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    Jul 2010
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    I have seen a western brown snake rear and try and strike right up level with my big Border collie's head who was on his hind legs boxing with the snake. This thing was rearing right up high. Fortunately when I called my dog came and no harm was done. The snake really just wanted to get away. It was a massive snake so had plenty of height.

    Not sure if rearing height equates to strike height but this snake had plenty of air time.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-07-2013 at 02:42 PM.

  6. #76
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    I have a long corrugated iron raised garden now (no soil here on the house site, only sand) that is now up and running. There is a clear path all around it and vantage points I can look for snakes as well as looking for tracks. I keep grinning thinking of clapping and hoping it just goes off stage and does not come back for an encore.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    We went camping on the weekend and our neighbours told us one of their group got bitten in the boot by a death adder in the shrub around our campsite. I'd never even heard of that snake.

    That evening Banjo started growling and barking, staring at the bushes between our camp and the cliffs. We couldn't see anyone or anything, so I went up to her and asked her "Who's there?" Big mistake! Before we knew it, Banjo's run a few metres into the scrub and started lunging at something in a big hole under the bushes. She was doing the strike, then jump back routine and didn't come at first when I called her. I got quite panicky because we're all wearing sandals and stuff and had to get right into the bush to grab Banjo. We only saw the dirt in the hole move when we eventually found a safe way to peer in. Though my daughter claims she saw a snake head.

    I felt quite down because I thought maybe this is the first dog I've been responsible for that doesn't have that natural respect for reptiles. She ran back a few times when I let her off the lead, but she came back when called and eventually lost interest. The snake had probably moved on by then. I'll have to watch her more closely in the bush. And I'll consider doing the snake avoidance course with her.

    The positive about it was that because she lured us towards the cliff, we happened to see a whale with calve, feeding right near the coastline.

  8. #78
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    Oct 2009
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    Rural NSW
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    When the dogs were playing with a RBB in their pen when I was away about 2 years ago before the pen was snake proofed, they were all rushed to the vet by hubby. Bandit tested positive for death adder from the past. Hubby says he hasn't seen one here for over 20 years. I had never heard of them either.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  9. #79

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    Death Adders are found in most parts of Australia and New Guinea and as it happens they are a snake I have studied and published on for more than 30 years, having discovered and scientifically named 9 of the 15 recognized species.
    In the attached image is my daughter holding a trio of a North Australian Death Adder (yes they kill people) and the magazine cover features an image of the Pilbara Death Adder, a species I first discovered in 1981 and formally named scientifically 17 years later.
    You will see they are shorter and fatter than most other snakes.
    By the way, the reason my kids can hold the snakes without risk of fatal bite is because our Death Adders are the only ones in the world surgically devenomized.
    We use them in educational public displays and by law they must be devenomized.
    Also and for what it's worth, they are very civilized snakes and as a rule don't bite people ... except when attacked.
    All the best

    AJH-Issues-13-15-2.jpg

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
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    Hi Snakeman,

    Can you recommend anyone in WA near Albany or Denmark? A friend of mine has a tiger snake living under her verandah and quite understandably she wants it gone...

    Cheers

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