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Thread: Snake Season ?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    743

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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post

    My remote collar is broken and so do not have access to one. However, in past, i found the amount of hair on a GSD long haired, prevents good contact. I had to shave the dogs neck to get a good contact.
    Is there another way, as i like his maine. I prefer a live dog, so will chop it if req though.
    Bernie- have you got the long or short contacts on your RT? The short ones are fine for short/ medium haired dogs, but for the GSD, I think you'll find you need the long probes (which can be purcahsed and fitted separately as I understand it)... understand your desire not to shave the beautiful mane entirely.... besides, then you'd alwways have the contacts on one spot which is far less than ideal.

    Good luck with the Vit C and spray bottle... I've learned quite a bit from this thread!!!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Kurrajong / Hawkesbury
    Posts
    189

    Default Lets Stay on Topic

    Hey Guys, I have removed some of the posts I think were getting personal.

    Snakeman, perhaps you have some good snake knowledge, I am no expert, but in your initial posts here it can be beneficial to try and get along with senior or long term members.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    Hi Everyone, I have recently relocated to 200acres of natural bush, wheat crops and pasture. The main snakes we have here appear to be the Gwyder and Dugite.

    There is a very large snake -browny grey in colour with a black head that must have its territory around the general area of the bush near my house. My dogs have come in contact a couple of times but fortunately it has tried to get away and I have called them off.

    Now things are warming off I have seen it once basking on some rocks. I have been clearing away things around the house etc.

    I am interested in snakes habits. Do they come looking for water (dogs bowls) and when is the safest time to walk dogs. Does the snake become active early in the cool of the morning and will it be out hunting on a warm summer night.

    How sensitive is a snake to vibration - I have a paddock that I train my dogs to herd on sheep. With all the commotion is it likely to get out of there.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hobart
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    115

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    We live in snake territory too, around our house was are able to keep grass and gardens clear of snake hide holes. I've found the best way to flush out snakes is to make a heap of noise, jump around, look like an idiot and you're generally safe.

    Being in tassie i see most snakes during the hottest part of the day, 11am-3pm, WA may be different.

    We've found that due to having large amounts of water away from our house, the snakes rather head to those water sources instead of approaching the yard where they know there are people and are likely to feel threatened. However we only have Whip, Tiger and Copperhead snakes, all of which are very shy.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    snakes will seek water, they do like pet's drinking bowls. They will also seek shade under houses and kennels etc when it's very hot.

    Mostly they will leave if you stomp around enough. We used to share a feed shed with a 2m brown snake. It couldn't keep up with all the mice so wasn't interested in bothering us, but we did make a lot of noise before we entered the shed so it would have time to leave (or go in its hole).

    The snake man we called, said that it would be difficult to catch it even if we knew where its hole was (we did), and if he removed it there would be a territorial battle by the neighbouring snakes and that might be worse than having one that was used to us, keep the others away. Its hole was under a pallett so the dogs couldnt get at it. But mostly they were more interested in the mice. I'm guessing because the snake and the mice were co-habiting in the feed shed - that snake poo does not repel mice. Well maybe from the snake hole but nowhere else.

    Grey brown snake with a black head sounds a bit like a mulga snake colour variation (that is related or the same as king brown) or maybe a gwardar - but it could be a lot of other things. The locals of central australia are particularily frightened of mulga snakes because they don't nick off when you stomp around. So the risk of stepping on one near the camp fire is high.

    The colour variation I saw was a browny grey snake - with a strip of black paint over both eyes and the top of its head. Didn't go all the way down the neck. A little bit like a baby brown snake (I've met one of those in an office I worked in near the swamps at the eastern end of Lake Burley Griffen in the ACT) - but not one.

    Other things -
    Inland Taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus) | Australian Venom Research Unit

    There is also a non-venomous python with a small black head - so I can't tell looking at them whether the snake is poisonous or not.

    I hate that you can't let your dog run free on a farm in the warmer months because of the snake risk.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Hobart
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    Something that will attract snakes is milk, don't know why but they love the stuff

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
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    697

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJay
    Something that will attract snakes is milk, don't know why but they love the stuff
    Never heard that before.
    Last edited by silvershadowwolf24; 09-29-2010 at 02:20 PM.

  8. #18

    Default Mmm,

    CJay your post about moving about etc to get rid of snakes is generally true.
    They hate disturbances, etc, but NOISE itself is a non-issue.
    Snakes are deaf - they have no ears...
    Also, someone here mentioned Tiger Snakes, etc, (from Tasmaina) as being generally timid.
    To the extent that all snakes are timid and shy of people you are correct, BUT compared to the rest, Tiger snakes are relatively pugnacious.
    This does however mean that snakes all over the place will run away from people.
    This week as a snake catcher in Melbourne, I've been running at about a call out a day (tonight had a Tiger snake call in Montmorency) ... taht snake had killed two chooks and a rabbit in the last week ... no dogs there, but with hotter weather forecast this week, I'd expect the rate to rise to about 3 a day (average) for the next week.
    All the best
    Snakeman
    Last edited by puggerup; 10-01-2010 at 07:23 PM. Reason: guidelines

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    Default i think its sorted.

    Whilst im not entirely happy with the word 'think', id prefer definate. But i guess australia/snakes is never going to be a world of definate.

    Came a across a snake, before the training. Bernie's posture alerted me to the fact the snake was there. He stood well back, and leaned in for a look. I went off with a really ferocious "NO" at him. The biggest alarming "No" ive ever told him, as i was terrified he'd be bitten. And called him back. Praised for coming.
    Then we approached the snake again. He wouldnt go near it. Backed off, trying to slip his collar to get away.

    Then on the way home, we passed where the snake was. again, he was very timid and alert whilst passing the area, wanting to get away.

    By jove, i think he's got it!

    Then, when doing garden yesterday, i pulled out of the ground, some old black hose pipe and threw it behind me, not seeing Bernie was nosing around me. He legged it when he saw the hose and waited for me to come to him to praise him. I guess dogs have more natural instinct for danger than i bargained for. Or is it that shepherds are a lot smarter than rotties? who just chomp them for lunch? Either way, im reassured.

    The vet would not supply me with vit c. And recommended against me injecting. Even when i said that i would be possibly hours away from getting to a vet in event of snakebite, and im a nurse and could give IM injection to a dog safely.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Rural Western Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    Then on the way home, we passed where the snake was. again, he was very timid and alert whilst passing the area, wanting to get away.

    By jove, i think he's got it!

    Then, when doing garden yesterday, i pulled out of the ground, some old black hose pipe and threw it behind me, not seeing Bernie was nosing around me. He legged it when he saw the hose and waited for me to come to him to praise him. I guess dogs have more natural instinct for danger than i bargained for. Or is it that shepherds are a lot smarter than rotties? who just chomp them for lunch? Either way, im reassured.
    Lucky you! my young border collies, kelpies and ACDS are not stupid dogs but as a pack they will go after a snake. They seem to have a very high prey drive and as I have 6 of them it is somewhat harder. I have called them off and they have come thank goodness, but I know tend to restrict where we walk and when we walk. It is a real pain.

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