Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Fence barking

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default Fence barking

    I am after advice on my dog and fence barking. I have asked before and had such responses as my dog is bored, or isn't happy I am going out, or my dog is not tired enough. None of these have been helpful.
    My dog barks at our next door neighbours dog every time he walks down the fence line. The neighbours dog does not bark or attack the fence, just walks down the fence and inside via their doggy door. My dog barks and has her heckles up. Our fence is solid and con not be seen through. My dog is fenced off from the neighbours fence about 3 -4 metres back so she cannot get to the fence. I can go out and distract her when she is barking and running back and forth from one end of the fence I have put to the other end, but she will go back to the barking when I am not out there next time the dog walks down the fence. When she has a fresh bone she will happily munch on that but is happy to leave it to bark at the neighbours dog and then return to it.
    I have tried going out and telling her off but she is not fussed, I have gone out and just patted her and distracted her but it has not lasting affect. I have chained her up and left her on the line for half an hour and she just lies their asleep and seems to not to be fussed by the neighbours dog but obviously this is not a long term solution, but does make me think that having her on the line makes her go 'off duty' and that is why she is not fussed by the dog.
    A trainer that I once had out did say that I was to chain my dog on a short lead an hour a day to give the dog down time, so she doesn't feel she needs to be on guard, so I don't now if this has anything to do with that theory.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Have you tried introducing her to the neighbours dog? Fence running is common and I think it's more a protection type of behaviour. Working because eventually the other dog/person/car or whatever eventually moves off. Hence the dog believes it's barking drove the offending thing away.

    There is training methods that require committment to overcome this, but I find most people don't have the time or patience for carrying it thru, they take a dedicated owner. So managing solutions include, building an inner fence along that fence line or planting bushes with a high fragrance, I find rosemary (if there is good sunlight) grows quickly and thickly and gives off a nice fragrance and build a light chicken mesh fence to protect the rosemary while it grows.

    Another method I've used is the soaker hose, lay a soaker hose along the fenceline, turn it on when your dog barks, turn it off when it stops. Just be careful to observe your timing is good and doesn't turn your dog off next doors even more.

    The training and good association method with next doors dog is the best and most proven, together with an introduction if your dog is dog friendly. You could get in a trainer to go thru the whole thing with you, I'd type in the whole method but only if your sure you'd be prepared to go thru the process.
    Last edited by MAC; 08-20-2012 at 07:53 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    I do have an inner fence. As stated, 3 to 4 metres back from the offending fence line. We were hoping to introduce the dogs this week but the neighbours dog has just been diagnosed with a slipped disc and will be out of action for 6 weeks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Sorry when people post in one big paragraph I miss things, I'm on a 10" laptop.

    Have you tried treating, when your dog is aware of the other dog but not yet barking.

    I did this with a dog that would bark every time next door stepped out on their balcony. Basically we built a positive association with next door being out on their balcony. It took time and dedication and the only time he was allowed out for a while was when some was prepared to go thru the training process.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    That may work but as the fence is solid metal I can't see so only know the other dog is there when mine barks. I will give it a go though. Would i get her to sit and just stay there? If so how would she know that she is being treated for not running the fence not for sitting?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    I had a dog who loved the 'fence attack'. She didn't do it constantly though, more like when we passed the neighbour's gate on our way out and stuff. So I never bothered trying to correct it.

    With the treating for ignoring, I think making her sit and stay is overcomplicating it and makes it less clear to the dog what she is being rewarded for. Just reward for calm behaviour when the neighbour's dog is near. Ideally you want her to know the dog is out there (eg. look in that direction) and then have the self control to look back at you. It will take a while before this behaviour works when you're not there though. I do this to prevent Banjo from jumping and even though I now notice she finally knows what is expected of her and is somewhat less motivated to jump even when she doesn't expect me to interfer, she will still get in a sneaky jump now and then when I'm not fast enough with my "Who's that" or too far away from her.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    No as pointed out by Beloz, you are treating the dog for being aware but not barking, dog doesn't have to do anything but not bark.

    This is what I mean about time and commitment, you will have to be ready with treats already cut up the minute your dog barks or have your dog elsewhere in the yard and let her into that area only when you are prepared to train.

    This is why I've done the soaker hose, cheap, and profided she's not a lover of water can almost be turned away from that area of the yard.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Mooroopna
    Posts
    100

    Default

    I need to wait for her to bark and then tell her to be quiet and reward her if she does? I only know the other dog is there if she barks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    Once she is already barking it will be much harder to intervene. The ideal way to do this is to try shape her behaviour before she gets to that excitement stage. Try to observe her behaviour for a while. It is likely that she does show some specific behaviour before she actually runs off to go bark. Maybe just her looking in the direction of the fence, or something like that.

  10. #10

    Default

    We have the kennel right to the side fence and we live in a corner house next to our suburb main street and across is a footy field (so imagine how many people and dogs walks close to our fence/yard). About 4 months ago she used to run straight to the fence and bark (like charging and barking). We then make her stay at the front yard (playing with us or after a long walk to wind down) and side yard let her see other dogs and human walk by, since we know that she's alright with other animal and people. After a while she stop charging to the fence but still barks (bark type that letting us know that there are people close to the fence) I can say her bark is more of making us aware that there are people around very close to the fence or walking on the lawn. we noticed a big change cause the growling stopped and when I ask her to stop she stops.

    Also, we still stay in the front and side yard where she can see people and dogs walking
    m<(o.o)>m

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •