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Thread: Hi all from Toecutter and Rex

  1. #1

    Default Hi all from Toecutter and Rex

    Hi everyone, this is my first post so would like to introduce me and my 2 y/o GSD Rex.

    I just picked him up a week ago from a family moving to Sydney and couldn't take him.

    I had a Male Akita for 8 years previously who unfortunately had to be put down after reaching a pretty good age of 13 years. I soo missed him and my partner found Rex for me. I think she really found him for herself!!!

    I love GSD's after having one as a Military Working Dog Handler.

    I have read a few posts and must say that i am a little old school in my training methods according to what I have read, but I am always up to learn new ideas provide advice if asked and partake in robust discussions.

    Cheers TC
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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    To the forum

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3

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    welcome - is it just me but most of GSD owners name their dog rex?
    m<(o.o)>m

  4. #4
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    Lovely Pooch...
    Welcome aboard.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  5. #5
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    awesome lookingdog you have there........ welcome aboard......
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pbk1776 View Post
    welcome - is it just me but most of GSD owners name their dog rex?
    Don't tell me you don't know Inspector Rex?! I watched it for years, including on SBS after I moved here from Europe.

    Welcome Toecutter. Beautiful dog! I grew up with GSDs so have a bit of a soft spot for them. For my own dogs now, I tend to pick something less "intense" though. I have a young rescue mystery breed mix that I got about 6 months ago.


    I think most of us here accept that there is not one training method that works for every dog or handler and in every situation. One of the reasons why many of us do recommend positive reinforcement methods is that they are easier to implement by inexperienced dog handlers. Some other methods require perfect timing and sometimes great skill for them to work and could have a negative impact on the dog's behaviour if not implemented correctly. I feel a lot more confident using predominantly reward based training on my dog - she is only my second dog - than when I tried more corrective methods with my first dog and probably got it wrong lots of the time. So I am happy to go slow and easy with my dog and because of the type of dog she is, it is working very well for us. But that doesn't mean that I think it is the only or the best way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Welcome!!

    I hate to ask, but where does the name "toecutter" stem from?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Don't tell me you don't know Inspector Rex?! I watched it for years, including on SBS after I moved here from Europe.

    Welcome Toecutter. Beautiful dog! I grew up with GSDs so have a bit of a soft spot for them. For my own dogs now, I tend to pick something less "intense" though. I have a young rescue mystery breed mix that I got about 6 months ago.


    I think most of us here accept that there is not one training method that works for every dog or handler and in every situation. One of the reasons why many of us do recommend positive reinforcement methods is that they are easier to implement by inexperienced dog handlers. Some other methods require perfect timing and sometimes great skill for them to work and could have a negative impact on the dog's behaviour if not implemented correctly. I feel a lot more confident using predominantly reward based training on my dog - she is only my second dog - than when I tried more corrective methods with my first dog and probably got it wrong lots of the time. So I am happy to go slow and easy with my dog and because of the type of dog she is, it is working very well for us. But that doesn't mean that I think it is the only or the best way.
    I knew it - its all about that TV show :-)
    m<(o.o)>m

  9. #9

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    Thanks all for your welcomes...

    As far as the name Rex goes, it was not my choice, just the name that he came with, plus unbelievably was the name of my working dog when I was in the Army, which also was the name he came with when I recruited him. It seems common as a name and more than likely does stem from the Inspector Rex show.

    Hey Beloz, as far as training is concerned, positive reinforcement is the one method that is not that easy to implement. It requires good timing, good voice inflection, understanding the psychology of the dog, being a little "left of centre" and most importantly as with any training...CONSISTENCY!!! something i cant agree with the use of food rewards because you aint always going to have a treat in your pocket and there goes the number one rule...CONSISTENCY!

    I hope I don't rub anyone up the wrong way with that, its just my opinion.

    Dogs are like people in some circumstances and will react to different methods in different ways; hey whatever works I say!!! When I was in the Army we tried many different methods of training that were out of the norm, some successful, some not.

    Hey Pawfectionist, the name Toecutter...long story, but I changed jobs from a dog handler to an Investigator later in my Army career and that was the nickname that they used to give us Investigators.

    Glad to be a part of a group of canine lovers!!!

    Cheers

    TC

  10. #10
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    I still think reward based training is more forgiving than some other methods. Your dog is never going to get scared of you or of a behaviour because you gave the voice and/or food reward at the wrong time. You can still enforce the wrong behaviour but it is fairly easy to just start again from scratch if you need to with no harm done. That is my lay interpretation anyway.

    I didn't use food rewards with my first dog but now I am a convert. I trained my current dog with food and got great results that I still get if I don't take the treats. In fact, inconsistent food rewards are a much better incentive for my dog once she understands what it is I want her to do because she is never quite sure when she will get a treat and when not so she'll do what I ask just to find out. And there are behaviours that I now consistently don't treat for anymore and I never have a problem with her not obeying with those.

    There we go, our fist discussion in your introduction post. I feel very enthusiastic about this topic because it is all fairly new to me and I have found the results quite exhilarating. But as I mentioned, I know that other methods work for other people and that they probably feel just as enthusiastic about it. In the end we all want the same results.

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