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Thread: Aspiring Dog Owner Here

  1. #11
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    Oct 2009
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    What attracts you to the Rottweiler BR?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleasanta View Post
    When you are not scared of them....when you can commit to the training and socialisation involved...when you know EVERYTHING there is to know about them and that is NOT just from reading Wikipedia mate! You need hands-on experience with this breed! You need to visit dogs shows and talk to breeders and exhibitors of Rottweilers.
    That's the plan


    Do your homework regarding the Sire and Dam....make sure they do not show ANY type of aggression and/or nervousness!
    That's also part of the plan

    When you know in your heart you can be assertive enough to handle a Rottweiler.
    That's why I've come here, that's why I have a plan in the first place

    I LOVE Rottweilers....they are beautiful and my Odin was gorgeous! Will I ever have one again...nope...I don't trust them...pure and simple!
    Your kinda making it sound like I'll be buying one tomorow morning - I won't be, it's a loooooooooooooooooooooooong way off yet, and in that time I'm going to learn as much about the breeds as I can.

  3. #13
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    Didn't the vet who euthanised your dogs pick up on the fact they were poisoned through their illnesses?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Hawkesbury, NSW
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    And that's why I am suggesting volunteering at a shelter, you'll meet dogs of all ages and all sizes....your friends dad will probably only deal in puppies.

    I really think you need to get over your nervousness of big dogs BEFORE you own one. Yes, if you get a pup you will get used to it's size as you are with it every day, but when you take it out you will encounter other big dogs, you might not be nervous of your own dog, but what of others.....that nervousness will transmit to your dog.

    At a shelter, the more senior members will take you under their wing and guide you the right way...I've done this with people in the past, adults and children, and it's a true delight to watch the transformation in people, as while they overcome their fears they learn about different breeds, get to know the dogs in the shelter and then are happy when they find they've gone to a home.

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

  5. #15
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    Jan 2010
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    Queensland
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    Hi and To the Forum!!!

    When I was your age (not that long ago, only 9 years) there was no way I would have been able to handle a Rottie, I know that you aren't planning this for a while, but I was hoping you might be able to answer a couple of questions just briefly

    1. How much free time do you have that you would actively and regularly put into training your dog? I'm not including exercise here either

    2. What do you want from your dog? This is very very important as you may find another breed entirely suits you much better

    3. Have you thought about the ongoing costs? Vets fees, vaccinations, council registration, desexing, worming, flea treatment, obedience club training, accident or emergency treatment (I saved $5k for mine and I pay monthly pet insurance too!!) etc. Do you have a plan for this?

    4. Do you still live near the same neighbour? If you get another dog will the neighbour do that to them too? What was the neighbours possible reasoning (were the dogs barkers and if so, what would you do differently to prevent this from happening again)

    I do think that you would be better off going to a shelter than a pet store. Anyone can deal with puppies, but volunteering at a pet store will teach you if you're ready for another dog, and as I think Greys said, you may just find that perfect dog for you! It is VERY rewarding and the dogs there will teach you a WHOLE lot of stuff!

    I'm not going to discourage you from a Rottie, but Cleasanta is right, they are not a dog for everyone and they are certainly a less than ideal choice for someone who is afraid of large dogs.

    Attached is a photo of one of the fosters that I had here in late 2008. He was 2 years old, and had some pretty bad habits that included leading people around by their hands if they didn't pay attention to him. I could fit both of my hands inside his mouth with room to spare.

    I am by no means even close to an expert on these dogs. I grew up with Blue Heelers and Border Collies, not once did any bite me, nor would they have dared. They would deter people by barking and growling but would not bite. The only dog I've been bitten by, that caused any kind of damage was a labrador. He meant business too.

    If you cannot trust the breed, you cannot trust your dog. Because you cannot trust your dog, you will suffer for it and your dog will suffer for it.

    Pop along to the obedience school Shar Pei Rescue recommended as that, IMO would help you a lot with your decision. Make sure you ask them how much time and effort they put into their training with their dogs. For at least the two years all the time you put into weightlifting will more than likely need to be spent training your dog... I have a kelpie cross puppy who's just 5 months old. I can't go running with him yet because it will do damage to his joints. Once he's an adult I'll be able to, but you cannot go running with a rottie for (I think!) it's two years.

    Can you handle losing that much time that you would normally have spent on yourself without resenting the dog?

    I think I've written a novel - so I'll stop there. I hope you don't think I'm lecturing you and I genuinely want to hear your answers. I highly commend and applaud you for doing your research before buying a dog or puppy!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Sydney
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    All great advice given already

    Hi and welcome btw

    I think its great you have come searching for info before finding yourself in a sad situation, and as a 20yr old putting in that effort is even better. (gee I sound old im 26 lol)

    Rottis are absolutely devine dogs to look at and I will always stop in my tracks to watch one pass by, They are also my Uncles heart dog, so any time I needed a dobe fix I would head over to his house lol. He is passionate about them and doesn't rec them for everyone. Like has been mentioned before serious time and effort needs to go into owning these gorgeous beastes.

    On here you will find lots of great info and also more valuable personal info and stories.

    good luck with your search

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Didn't the vet who euthanised your dogs pick up on the fact they were poisoned through their illnesses?
    More than likely since we told them what happened, I was there to say last goodbyes.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    Hi and To the Forum!!!

    When I was your age (not that long ago, only 9 years) there was no way I would have been able to handle a Rottie, I know that you aren't planning this for a while, but I was hoping you might be able to answer a couple of questions just briefly

    1. How much free time do you have that you would actively and regularly put into training your dog? I'm not including exercise here either
    ALOT. Think about it, your at work what, a maximum of 6-8 hours a day, maybe 9 if you have to do over time. Another 2-3 hours to eat all the meals in your day AND to formally exersize in the gym, and how many hours in a day are left over to wade around in pure boredom? not including weekends which I don't normally work shifts on.

    2. What do you want from your dog? This is very very important as you may find another breed entirely suits you much better
    I want a companion and a friend. I try to be carefull with the words I use because I don't want some dog to keep chained up in the back yard for the rest of its miserable life. I want a companion and a best friend, something that I can pour love and attention onto. Humans SUCK, the last thing I really want is another human friend in real life.

    3. Have you thought about the ongoing costs? Vets fees, vaccinations, council registration, desexing, worming, flea treatment, obedience club training, accident or emergency treatment (I saved $5k for mine and I pay monthly pet insurance too!!) etc. Do you have a plan for this?
    I'm saving up to do my personal fitness training course at TAFE now, that's my first priority. Then when I am employed full time at a gym, I will save up everything I can to put towards the pup. From now till the moment I have the pup in my arms and beyond is just about learning and research.

    4. Do you still live near the same neighbour? If you get another dog will the neighbour do that to them too? What was the neighbours possible reasoning (were the dogs barkers and if so, what would you do differently to prevent this from happening again)
    Yes we do still live near the same neighbour... our dogs wern't barkers except when they were really excited. MY personal dog barely made a noise at all. What would I do differently to prevent this from happening again? well, it will be hard to draw you a diagram verbally, but there is a small walkway between the neibours side of the fence, our shed and our backyard. I would put a door there. I would also teach him to eat only upon command, and eat only when he's inside too.

    I do think that you would be better off going to a shelter than a pet store. Anyone can deal with puppies, but volunteering at a pet store will teach you if you're ready for another dog, and as I think Greys said, you may just find that perfect dog for you! It is VERY rewarding and the dogs there will teach you a WHOLE lot of stuff!

    I'm not going to discourage you from a Rottie, but Cleasanta is right, they are not a dog for everyone and they are certainly a less than ideal choice for someone who is afraid of large dogs.

    Attached is a photo of one of the fosters that I had here in late 2008. He was 2 years old, and had some pretty bad habits that included leading people around by their hands if they didn't pay attention to him. I could fit both of my hands inside his mouth with room to spare.

    I am by no means even close to an expert on these dogs. I grew up with Blue Heelers and Border Collies, not once did any bite me, nor would they have dared. They would deter people by barking and growling but would not bite. The only dog I've been bitten by, that caused any kind of damage was a labrador. He meant business too.

    If you cannot trust the breed, you cannot trust your dog. Because you cannot trust your dog, you will suffer for it and your dog will suffer for it.

    Pop along to the obedience school Shar Pei Rescue recommended as that, IMO would help you a lot with your decision. Make sure you ask them how much time and effort they put into their training with their dogs. For at least the two years all the time you put into weightlifting will more than likely need to be spent training your dog... I have a kelpie cross puppy who's just 5 months old. I can't go running with him yet because it will do damage to his joints. Once he's an adult I'll be able to, but you cannot go running with a rottie for (I think!) it's two years.
    I've been weightlifting with ease for more than 5 years, want me to post a picture? that is more than what 99% of the total world population can say. If I can force myself to the gym on days I would honestly prefer to commit suicide on, then I can raise a dog.

    Can you handle losing that much time that you would normally have spent on yourself without resenting the dog? Yes I can. You only spend a total of like 4-5 & 1/2 hours in a gym in a 7 day period, I have a few hours to spare

    I think I've written a novel - so I'll stop there. I hope you don't think I'm lecturing you and I genuinely want to hear your answers. I highly commend and applaud you for doing your research before buying a dog or puppy!

    Thanks again everyone for the replies. You see, I'm sold on the idea of becomming the carer of a pup, and I know I would treat it with the love and respect and attention it deserves. I bet you guys love your pets too, and would do anything to see them healthy and happy.. well I'm in a spot now where your advice could, in the long run, mean another accident for both of us, or a relationship to be proud of.
    I want to do this, I CAN do this. But not without help. I will not be pulling any punches when it comes to raising another dog-friend.

  9. #19
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    Mar 2010
    Location
    South Australia
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    4

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    Hey Big Red, All the best with your quest for a Rotti, knowing how to train your dog before you actually get it is an excellent place to start too.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    ALOT. Think about it, your at work what, a maximum of 6-8 hours a day, maybe 9 if you have to do over time. Another 2-3 hours to eat all the meals in your day AND to formally exersize in the gym, and how many hours in a day are left over to wade around in pure boredom? not including weekends which I don't normally work shifts on.
    Actually work is usually 8 hours + travel time per day. Say you have 2 hours at the gym there's 12 hours gone (working with 1 hour to travel to and from work) Then you'll need around another 1-2 hours for training alone, another hour for an adult dog for exercise (going for walks etc) There's 15 hours gone. That leaves you with 9 hours to eat, sleep, do your housework and chill out in front of the tv... There's also those incidental things that you may want to do that you'll need to adjust for.


    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    I want a companion and a friend. I try to be carefull with the words I use because I don't want some dog to keep chained up in the back yard for the rest of its miserable life. I want a companion and a best friend, something that I can pour love and attention onto. Humans SUCK, the last thing I really want is another human friend in real life.
    Yep, people do suck, but they are a necessity. Do you live alone? If not then the people who live with you (even though they may be family to) are your friends. You still have a natural requirement to interact with other people

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    I'm saving up to do my personal fitness training course at TAFE now, that's my first priority. Then when I am employed full time at a gym, I will save up everything I can to put towards the pup. From now till the moment I have the pup in my arms and beyond is just about learning and research.
    I hope you also add practical application of what you have learnt in there

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    Yes we do still live near the same neighbour... our dogs wern't barkers except when they were really excited. MY personal dog barely made a noise at all. What would I do differently to prevent this from happening again? well, it will be hard to draw you a diagram verbally, but there is a small walkway between the neibours side of the fence, our shed and our backyard. I would put a door there. I would also teach him to eat only upon command, and eat only when he's inside too.
    What about while it's a pup? Why would you put a door in between your fence and the walkway so your neighbour can just walk into your yard? That would make it more dangerous wouldn't it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    I've been weightlifting with ease for more than 5 years, want me to post a picture? that is more than what 99% of the total world population can say. If I can force myself to the gym on days I would honestly prefer to commit suicide on, then I can raise a dog.
    Bull! Sorry mate, but that is a crock. Maybe if you'd said 60% it'd be more believable. I can weightlift with ease and have been able to for at least 10 years. I can't lift the weight I could 10 years ago now, but I can still do it... Oh, and BTW, because exercise produces endorphins you're far less likely to have feelings of suicide unless you have gone suddenly from large amounts of exercise to none, and then it would be relatively easy to get back to the gym

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    Yes I can. You only spend a total of like 4-5 & 1/2 hours in a gym in a 7 day period, I have a few hours to spare.
    That depends on how far you are taking it, but ok then. What about the rest of your life? Boy/Girlfriend when you get one etc... What happens then?

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Red View Post
    Thanks again everyone for the replies. You see, I'm sold on the idea of becomming the carer of a pup, and I know I would treat it with the love and respect and attention it deserves. I bet you guys love your pets too, and would do anything to see them healthy and happy.. well I'm in a spot now where your advice could, in the long run, mean another accident for both of us, or a relationship to be proud of.
    I want to do this, I CAN do this. But not without help. I will not be pulling any punches when it comes to raising another dog-friend.
    Yep, you're so sold on the idea that you are only listening to part of what we are saying or asking so you can turn it around to work for you.

    Yes I do anything to ensure that my little boy is happy, healthy, well socialised, friendly (so I don't add to the dog bite pandemic), very well trained and an all around brilliant addition to canine society. I gave up friends, tv and my exercise regime (well altered drastically) to suit his needs. I gave up my saturdays and sundays for him - so he can go to the dog club and so he can have a morning at the park or the beach (on his own because I don't like dog parks or dog beaches, just a personal preference) and so on. It is not just a commitment, the dog is your responsibility. How he or she behaves reflects on you and his or her behavior will ONLY be a result of the time and effort you put in to effective training.

    And you are the only one who can do anything to impact the relationship you have with your dog. We are just people on the other end of the computer with no way of knowing if you're telling the truth, lying or just having some fun with us.

    Yes you can do it. If you show the dog as much commitment as you do your body....

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