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Thread: Death of innocent pets, vets say.

  1. #1

    Default Death of innocent pets, vets say.


    Owner Samantha Graham saying goodbye on Thursday.

    The Australian Veterinary Association has slammed Victorian laws which led to two innocent dogs being euthanased.

    The dogs, named Bear and Kooda, were put down under the state's new dangerous dog laws in Shepparton on Thursday after their owners lost a lengthy legal battle to save their lives.
    The dogs did not do anything wrong but were destroyed after a local council officer identified them as pit bull crosses, despite owners Nathan Laffan and Samantha Graham's claims they were bred from a bull mastiff cross American bulldog and a staffie cross ridgeback.

    AVA Victoria president Susan Maastricht said the case showed how some dogs could end up as "scapegoats" under the laws.

    “‘Bear’ and ‘Kooda’ were impounded because they look like pit bull crosses,” Dr Maastricht said.
    "This is exactly why we were opposed to the legislation from the outset."
    "Not only will it fail to prevent dog bites, innocent dogs can clearly end up being scapegoats because of the way they look.”

    Mr Laffan and Ms Graham were the first Victorians to challenge the dog laws - introduced last September after the fatal mauling of Melbourne toddler Ayen Chol - in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).

    At the centre of the Cobram couple's case against Moira Shire Council, which they lost in May, was a statutory declaration from a local breeder saying the dogs came from a bull mastiff cross American bulldog and a staffie cross ridgeback.

    The legislation provided guidelines for councils on how to identify pit bulls based on key markers including muscular build, head profile and size-to-weight ratio, Victoria’s Agriculture Minister Peter Walsh said.

    “To help councils enforce the law, the coalition government introduced visual standards to help council officers correctly identify pit bull-type dogs and provided training for council officers in use of the standard,” he said.

    Dr Maastricht said if Bear and Kooda fit the standards then it was most likely they were pit bull crosses, but there still was a chance the council officer could have been mistaken.
    "To some degree there is the potential for subjectivity," she said.

    Identifying pit bulls could also be problematic because all pit bulls were technically cross-bred, she said.
    "You could have a litter of these pups and all of them could look completely different," she said.
    Sources: Australian Veterinary Association, Victoria Agriculture Minister Peter Walsh
    Author: Emily O'Keefe. News editor: Henri Paget.

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=8484675
    Last edited by Beau; 06-16-2012 at 05:22 PM. Reason: source link

  2. #2

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    I am appalled that people think this is Ok and that these laws get through in the first place. They should be looking at restricting dog ownership (or somehow trying to enforce responsible dog ownership) rather than breed type.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Logan, Brisbane QLD
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    It's not sad it's f&%$^*# disgusting. I have to commend the owner of her strength in being able to say goodbye to her beloved pets in such a calm manner. I would have turned up with a gun if that was my dog. It takes a strong person to walk into a situation such as that with her head held high. I would've been out for blood.

    I am hoping this causes such an uproar & outrage in the community of dog owners that perhaps something good could come out of such a horrible & appalling event. I hope that people will scream & shout even louder now, because ALL our dogs lives could be in danger - and get this stupid law overturned.

  4. #4

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    Heart-breaking

  5. #5

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    Can you pleae post a link to this story beau, i want to share it around many non-dog forums as i think people need to see that completely innocent family pets are getting caught up in this nonsense.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Can you pleae post a link to this story beau, i want to share it around many non-dog forums as i think people need to see that completely innocent family pets are getting caught up in this nonsense.
    Sorry I forgot the link, I have edited the OP to add it at the end.

    Here is the AVA media release also.

    Cookie support required | Australian Veterinary Association


    Pet dogs fall victim to Victorian legislation

    Friday, 15 June 2012
    Download this media release as a PDF

    Australia’s peak veterinary body, the Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) continues to be concerned about Victorian laws that have seen two dogs destroyed based solely on their appearance.

    “‘Bear’ and ‘Kooda’ were impounded because they look like pit bull crosses as prescribed by the government guidelines,” said Dr Susan Maastricht, President of the Victorian Division of the AVA.

    The dogs were then found to meet the Standard For Restricted Breed Dogs, which was introduced as a way of identifying pit bulls and pit bull crosses in Victoria in September 2011.

    “Unfortunately their owners recently lost their appeal to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal and the dogs have been put down. This is exactly why we were opposed to the legislation from the outset. Not only will it fail to prevent dog bites, innocent dogs can clearly end up being scapegoats because of the way they look,” Dr Maastricht said.

    “While the AVA believes that dogs that have shown aggressive behaviour should be regulated strongly, you can’t tell whether a dog is dangerous just by looking at it, or even by its breed.

    “We know that all dogs have the potential to react aggressively if scared or threatened but most dogs don’t bite people, so the banning of some breeds over others doesn’t make sense.

    “The legislation in Victoria is not a solution. Experience in other parts of the world has shown that banning breeds doesn’t reduce dog bites. The AVA stands ready and willing to work with governments to find a more reasonable and realistic solution to what is obviously a complex issue.

    “Keeping the public safe from dog bites is paramount and requires a coordinated approach involving management of the dogs and education of humans. The AVA recommends that a combination of comprehensive registration of all dogs, early socialisation and training of pups, owner education, public awareness campaigns, adult supervision of children around all dogs and enforcement of leash laws is a much more effective option,” Dr Maastricht said.

    The AVA is currently preparing a national model for dangerous dog regulations based on effective policy options from around the world. The AVA will be advocating for all states to adopt this model.

    For further information and requests for interviews contact the AVA media office on (02) 9431 5062, 0439 628 898 or media@ava.com.au.



    The Australian Veterinary Association (AVA) is the national professional association of veterinary surgeons in Australia. Founded in 1921, the AVA today represents 5000 members working in all areas of animal science, health and welfare.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Sounds like the AVA is onto it with regards to law changes. I think we all need to back them up and hopefully if enough people join we can make a change.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  8. #8

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    another article, basically the same, just a few extra pics

    Dog laws led to death of innocent pets, vets say

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    605

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    Sad stories are sad. Dislike reading .
    No one loves you like your dog does.

  10. #10

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    A second article with some extra information.

    Two dogs labelled as pit bulls by a local council in Victoria have been euthanased after their owners lost a lengthy legal battle to save their lives.

    The dogs, named Bear and Kooda, were put down in Shepparton yesterday under the state's new dangerous dog laws.

    The two dogs had not done anything wrong, but the laws allow councils to seize and destroy unregistered pit bull terriers and their crosses based on visual identification.

    The strict laws were introduced last year after the fatal mauling of Melbourne toddler Ayen Chol.

    Nathan Laffan and Samantha Graham, the owners of Bear and Kooda, were the first Victorians to challenge the dog laws in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT), claiming their dogs had been wrongly identified as pit bulls.

    At the centre of the Cobram couple's case against Moira Shire Council was a statutory declaration from a local breeder who said the dogs actually came from a bull mastiff cross American bulldog and a staffie cross ridgeback.

    They lost the case on May 10 and the dogs were ordered to be euthanased.

    Mr Laffan told ninemsn Bear and Kooda were not dangerous and "wouldn't hurt anyone".

    "They were just the kindest and best dogs. They were always playful, we loved them so much," he said.

    "We would have trusted them around children more than most babysitters."

    The legal battle began in September when Mr Laffan heard the dog laws were about to be introduced and contacted Moira Shire Council to ensure his pets would be safe.

    A council officer who went out to the couple's home identified the dogs as pit bulls and had them seized and taken to a local pound.

    DNA tests cannot identify pit bulls or pit bull crosses and were unable to be used to confirm the breed.

    Mr Laffan is now calling for behaviour tests to be used to assess a dog’s temperament, rather than the new laws which target specific breeds.

    "The laws are all messed up they should never have brought them in," Mr Laffan said.

    "We were just trying to do the right thing and they (the council) just stabbed us in the back."

    Moira Shire Director of Development Scott Taylor confirmed the dogs had been put down as a result of the VCAT order.

    "The legislative requirements were carried out by council after all avenues of appeal had been exhausted," Mr Taylor said.

    Mr Laffan said they were given just an hour's notice and few minutes to say goodbye to their dogs after the time they were to be put down was brought forward by a day.

    "It was hectic to be honest we were just trying to make sure we got there in time. It was just a really quick goodbye and that was it."

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