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Thread: Lick lipping

  1. #11
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    Di Dee

    Does Jodi also take great joy in rolling in farm animal poo given the chance? Is another favourite thing for an ACDx to do.

    I was hoping that Frosty would never notice the horse poo on the beach - but she has now... and I try to get her on lead before she notices it. Dead sea creatures are bad enough but they're easier to wash off.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Di Dee

    Does Jodi also take great joy in rolling in farm animal poo given the chance? Is another favourite thing for an ACDx to do.

    I was hoping that Frosty would never notice the horse poo on the beach - but she has now... and I try to get her on lead before she notices it. Dead sea creatures are bad enough but they're easier to wash off.
    Newfie's do Campers poo (the wors thing EVER), Carp, dead roo, dead cow, horse manure, cow manure (especially wet stuff) LOL............Luckily we walk by the River or Lake
    Pets are forever

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Di Dee

    Does Jodi also take great joy in rolling in farm animal poo given the chance? Is another favourite thing for an ACDx to do.
    No, but that is because they are confined to the house, back yard and dog yard.

    Shadow (RIP) my last ACD certainly did and also brought home road kill or a bit of a cow that had died.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #14
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    Maybe scent of Di Dee poo, is the best Jodi can do...

    Sometimes depriving a dog of simple pleasures is for the best, but try explaining that to them.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Maybe scent of Di Dee poo, is the best Jodi can do...

    .
    I think you may be right, lol. I hadn't thought of that!

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #16
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    Rosie has a few of licking signals... and one of them is definitely "I feel sick" - if her tongue doesn't make it to the outside of her jowls to do the "wipe around", and she is a bit burpy or hiuccupy (also signs of nausea apparently), then she's feeling ill - mostly this happened about an hour after her antibiotics, and now she's got an anti-nausea med that we give her before, this has almost vanished.

    Then there's the "I love you too" licky licky sign... the tongue makes it out of the mouth (only just, ever so slightly), doesn't do the "wipe around", just like she's moistening her mouth... this only happens when I'm giving her a snuggle when she's snoozing or snoozy and I tell her what a good girl she is.

    And then there's the "hurry UP I'm HUNGRY" licky licky that involves dribbling (a new phenomena for Rosie), doing the "wipe around" with a very broad tongue, general licking of lips and sometimes even a lip-smacking sound, lol!

    Definitely needs to be taken in context. From what you;ve described, it sounds more like "oh my, this is some good cuddling!" rather than "get me a bucket I want to barf".

  7. #17
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    Oh I know what her licking meant lol, when shes getting cuddles from mum her licking means "I am in bliss". And I know when shes uncomfortable with a situation too by the way she licks her lips...

    I was just curious about responses in regard to a dog doing it when anxious, yet people using the same thing to calm them really.

    I have never used lip licking to calm, so just wanted to know why that would work on a dog who is licking his lips when hes anxious as I thought it would just make them think you were anxious also lol

  8. #18
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    Dogs, say bitches use it for their puppies and so do the more confident dog in the household for the younger dogs......It is a dog behaviour, hence it works.......Also it is sometimes used by a submissive dog to prevent a more forward dog to be aggressive, hence calming the dog. The lick lipping is dog behaviour, hence it works..When I get home I will try to give you a more detailed answer (if I remember LOL)
    Last edited by newfsie; 05-30-2012 at 01:06 PM.
    Pets are forever

  9. #19
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    The Key To Understanding
    The following overview, in Turid's own words, gives the essence of her theory on calming signals.
    "Dogs, being pack animals, have a language for communication with each other.
    Canine language in general consists of a large variety of signals using body, face, ears, tail, sounds, movement, and expression.
    The dog's innate ability to signal is easily lost or reinforced through life's experience.
    If we study the signals dogs use with each other and use them ourselves, we increase our ability to communicate with our dogs.
    Most noteworthy of all canine signals are the calming signals which are used to maintain a healthy social hierarchy and resolution of conflict within the Pack.
    These are skills which, when carried over to our own interactions with dogs can be highly beneficial to our relationship.
    Dogs have the ability to calm themselves in the face of a shock (fearful or stressful situation) and to calm each other as well.
    As an example let's consider the manner in which dogs meet each other.
    Dogs which are worried in a social situation can communicate concepts such as: 'I know you are the boss around here and I won't make trouble'.
    Furthermore, the boss dog is very apt to want the worried dog to realize that no trouble is intended.
    'Don't worry, I'm in charge around here and I mean you no harm.' Dogs which do not signal properly can be the cause of problems."
    ( as in dogs who left the litter too early)

    Canine Calming Signals, The Foundation of Communication?
    For a moment, let's take ourselves away from established ideas and labels concerning subordinance displays, displacement activities, rituals,
    drives and for a few moments think about canine body language as Turid Rugaas does.
    Those of us which have the opportunity to observe a group of well-socialized dogs interacting freely may see the following calming signals:

    MOVING SLOWLY
    A dog intending to use signals, upon seeing another dog in the distance, will start to move slowly.
    This exaggerated slow motion is a calming signal, and one which can be used early and effectively when meeting.
    Joggers, cars and bicycles may approach quickly and may appear as a threat.
    Example: Carl and his dog Sheena were walking down a narrow city sidewalk. A young boy ran along the sidewalk in the opposite direction.
    Sheena was worried about this quick motion and immediately attempted, as best she could while on a tight leash,
    to display calming signals with her body language. Sheena was ignored by the child who was intent other things.
    Sheena's signals were of no use, so she resorted to threats such as barking a "get away from me" warning.

    MOVING IN AN ARC
    Rarely upon first meetings will dogs approach each other nose to nose.
    Only dogs which are very sure of the outcome of a situation will attempt to meet head on.
    More frequently dogs approach each other in curving lines, walk beyond each other's nose to sniff rear ends while standing side to side.
    Perhaps Carl could have been more attentive,
    recognized a troublesome situation for his dog and helped Sheena by leading her in an arc past the oncoming child.
    This curving theory has been proven time and time again. Ask any groomer or veterinarian.
    Most apprehensive dogs are more easily approached if not confronted head on. When approached from the side,
    one can gain the dog's confidence more readily.
    Unfortunately dogs are constantly put into situations where they must accept confrontation. It's wise to condition dogs to accept this eventuality gracefully.

    SNIFFING THE GROUND
    Dogs use their noses to explore their environment, but at times sniffing seems to have a different significance.
    Owners have attributed out of context sniffing to lack of concentration or stalling.
    Some say it's a displacement activity. Turid categorizes sniffing during times of stress as a calming signal.
    Example: You and your dog Spot are patiently waiting in the veterinarian's reception room. Spot is thinking,
    "Wow! that human in the long white coat keeps walking in and out.
    She looks and smells strangely. This is scary! I'd better sniff the floor of the waiting room now to show that I mean no harm and maybe she'll leave me alone."
    Granted, the floor of the waiting room probably has many intriguing smells, but it could be Spot's way to calm himself and others around him.
    Example: Ken allowed his dog Ginger off leash. "Ginger, COME" thunders Ken. Ginger approached Ken slowly, in a curve, then paused to sniff.
    Is she being spiteful or could it be conflict resolution?
    Has her past experience taught her that "Come" is often followed by an unpleasant state of affairs –
    time to go home, time to come away from something more interesting, time to receive a punishment?
    What tone of voice, body posture and facial expressions does Ken use when calling Ginger?
    Is Ginger untrained, bad, distracted or is she trying to explain something to Ken?

    SITTING, LYING
    These positions are probably the most graphic calming signals of all. You can see them being used in active play sessions.
    A dog will spontaneously drop when things get out of control.
    How many dogs, when receiving a reprimand from the owner will sit or lie down? Turid sees this as a signal that the dog is anxious and is trying to
    calm the owner down.


    LIP LICKING
    This quick little flick of the tongue is language which often goes unnoticed because it is shadowed by more overt signals.
    It is yet another way for a dog to convey the same message, for everybody to calm down.
    Go back through some photos of your dogs. Frequently lip licking can be seen in photographs.
    Posing for a photo can be a problem for some dogs. Many are worried about the camera which has a staring eye following their every move!

    BLINKING, AVERTING EYES, TURNING AWAY
    When a dog approaches another, it's a very interesting moment in time for those individuals.
    Why then, do we see dogs looking away, exaggerating an eye blink or turning their heads away from approaching dogs? Is it disinterest,
    distraction or a calming signal?
    People who work with dogs realize early in their careers that they can gain the confidence of a worried dog more quickly by avoiding direct eye contact,
    or even better, by turning away with their backs or sides to the dog.

    YAWNING
    Perhaps the most intriguing of all signals is yawning.
    Jane and her dog Fido are at the neighborhood barbecue. The volleyball players are smacking the ball with gusto,
    the music is playing with a resounding beat and people are animated and noisy. With all of this fun going on Fido still gives an occasional yawn.
    Can he be sleepy? Perhaps. Or is Fido yawning to reduce his stress and to calm down the others present.
    If Jane were to turn her own head away from the noisy people and yawn, would this reassure Fido?

    DOES SIGNALING WORK FOR ALL DOGS?
    Some dogs don't play by the rules. There are numerous reasons a dog might lose the inborn ability to use calming signals properly.
    Puppies learn valuable lessons from their environment.
    One must be very careful about the company a puppy keeps or the pup might learn that calming signals are of no use.
    If a pup, while displaying calming signals, encounters a dog lacking respect for appropriate body language, is attacked, much ground has been lost.
    This pup might learn to use threatening actions as a life insurance policy instead of calming signals.
    Luckily, with most dogs it takes more than one or two unfortunate incidents to extinguish signaling. Calming is a very dominant instinct in dogs.
    However it's a good idea to protect young dogs from interacting with unnatural, angry dogs.
    Safe, friendly dogs with good signals are the best teachers a young dog can have.
    Puppy classes are helpful in teaching these lessons, but can do more harm than good if inappropriate dogs are allowed to interact.
    Some owners hamper a dog's attempt to communicate with other dogs or humans by inhibiting them with leashes.
    Yes, by all means dogs should be on leash. No, it is not safe to turn your dog loose to "communicate freely" with an unknown dog.
    But be aware that you could be helping your dog get into trouble by preventing appropriate body language.
    A more prudent plan is for you and your pet to keep your distance from an unknown entity.
    Whether on purpose or unintentionally, some dogs have been taught to ignore signals.
    Many responsible owners seek dog obedience classes as an opportunity to train their dogs.
    Here's a typical obedience class exercise: Owners command their dogs to Sit and Stay. Dogs happily comply.
    The class instructor now asks owners and dogs to take turns weaving among the sitting dogs.
    This is fine in an advanced class of dogs with well-know temperaments.
    But in a beginner's class a handler might be asked to prevent a fearful dog from signaling.
    For example, Brownie is trying her best to maintain the sit-stay while the other dogs in class weave around her.
    She may be a little worried about the next dog approaching, so she wants to use her calming signals and tries to lie down.
    She is prevented from breaking her sit-stay by her owner pulling up on the lead. Next she tries to slowly move away, another common calming signal.
    Brownie's owner forces her back into position. What about King, the approaching dog?
    King is made to stay in heel position and cannot move slowly either. Nor can King curve and certainly he is not allowed to sniff.
    What about the enthusiastic trainer who gives overly sharp commands or pushes the dog too far to fast in an exercise?
    The dog may try to signal the owner to let up a little.
    Here we see yawning on the sit-stay, sniffing on the heeling, curving slowly on the recall, turning away on the sit in front.

    Anyway, I hope all this helps..Turid is one of my heroes..she opened the world of dog language to me and made dog training so much easier...i just love it, I preach it, follow it, teach it and use it
    Pets are forever

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Oh I know what her licking meant lol, when shes getting cuddles from mum her licking means "I am in bliss". And I know when shes uncomfortable with a situation too by the way she licks her lips...

    I was just curious about responses in regard to a dog doing it when anxious, yet people using the same thing to calm them really.

    I have never used lip licking to calm, so just wanted to know why that would work on a dog who is licking his lips when hes anxious as I thought it would just make them think you were anxious also lol
    LaLa - I know that you say you know what she means - but what is she licking - her lips or your hand when you cuddle her ! When my pup comes up for a cuddle - yes he asks for it - I don't demand cuddles - he offers. I have taught him to lick faces - but that is only to take into account kids around my neighbourhood and silly adults - because he is classed as a big dog !

    When I give the pup some massage treatment - like between his eyes - he just melts likewise down his chest area.

    So pups licking lips means a lot of different things - it is up to us poor silly owners to work out what it means - with the help of newfsie.

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