Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Is he likely to grow out of it???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,788

    Exclamation Is he likely to grow out of it???

    Okay so some of you know Koda has had issues in the past year or so...

    We have pretty much got on top of Koda's agressiveness towards visitors... he now welcomes most people.... authough he still gives the odd bark/howl (its an aussie thing ) at some people!

    He is now just over 2 years old... ohh fun... the teenager years
    So recently (the past 6 months or so) he has started getting quite reactive to dogs the same size/bigger than him... we are pretty sure it is a fear reaction... either way, it is causing him to become quite agressive towards dogs

    We recently had a kelpie come to our place, and much to my surprise, koda was fine with him! i havent had the chance to take koda where there are other dogs since then to see how he goes... but i presume he is still fearful with most dogs...

    Anyway... at the moment my tactic is, when i see a dog coming, i get koda to sit next to me and if he behaves well and focuses on me he continuously gets rewards... but if he reacts... i move him further away from the dog and get him to focus on me again...

    pretty much what i am asking is...
    1. Am i using a good tactic for this issue?
    2. Is it likely that he will be calmer with other dogs once he is 3 years old and is out of the adolecent stage?

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't have much advice but if it's fear based, it probably can be worked through, slowly. If it's actual real aggression, it's probably going to be harder to work on. With your tactic, in my eyes, you're just teaching him to behave around a dog, not really get on with a dog. I mean, if you work on it enough, maybe if you got closer, he might behave but that doesn't mean he'll be truly friendly. I guess it depends on your dog really.

    My Kelpie x who has fear issues used to try and attack strange dogs, out of fear. Recently, anytime she has gone to react, she gets corrected and she has slowly learnt I do not want that behavior. I'm trying to show her she doesn't need to react because strange dogs aren't that bad. For the first time in months, I took her to the dog beach yesterday with my trainer and she did amazing. She didn't react once to the other dogs, remembering before all the training, she'd try to attack any other dog.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tahlz View Post
    I don't have much advice but if it's fear based, it probably can be worked through, slowly. If it's actual real aggression, it's probably going to be harder to work on. With your tactic, in my eyes, you're just teaching him to behave around a dog, not really get on with a dog. I mean, if you work on it enough, maybe if you got closer, he might behave but that doesn't mean he'll be truly friendly. I guess it depends on your dog really.

    My Kelpie x who has fear issues used to try and attack strange dogs, out of fear. Recently, anytime she has gone to react, she gets corrected and she has slowly learnt I do not want that behavior. I'm trying to show her she doesn't need to react because strange dogs aren't that bad. For the first time in months, I took her to the dog beach yesterday with my trainer and she did amazing. She didn't react once to the other dogs, remembering before all the training, she'd try to attack any other dog.
    Thankyou i really appreciate your input!
    i am really hoping i can sort this out so i can actually take him out with other dogs and not worry... lol... he was suposed to be my agility dog...
    when you say you corrected her... what did that involve?

  4. #4

    Default

    Welcome

    He still can be your agility dog, as long as you can get him to ignore other dogs and not chase after them!

    Before she has the chance to react or if I miss that, as she reacts, I'd give her a leash correction. I am using a dominant dog collar (though I use her normal collar if I forget to put the other on, the dominant collar works better since it sits at the top of the neck) and I pop/pull her to the side, a sharp, quick pop. If I am walking past a dog, I keep doing that pop if she is reacting but she stops after one or two pops and keeps walking. You can reward with a street once you've passed or if he looks up at you and stops reacting. Now, if you can go around a dog he doesn't exactly like and hang around, TRY and correct him with a leash pop before he reacts (if you can do that, it'll make it easier) but if not, pop him anytime he goes to react or if he gives the other dog a dirty look. Make him sit and behave next to this dog. IF you get to this point. If getting to close is hard for him, start at a distance. See, I'm lucky and I could start with a dog a foot away from me, thats how fast my girl learns to behave once corrected. I do like to reward her when she does behave/look up at me so she still gets a bit of positive fun out of it. Though, she is also learning other dogs aren't evil.

    This is what worked for me. It may not work for you. My girl is a lot softer then your dog, I'm sure. If this has just started, I really think you can nip this in the butt.

    I know this is a bit negative training but I have tried positive and I do a lot of positive work with her but the leash corrections really work for her. She is slowly becoming a much happier dog.
    Last edited by Tahlz; 05-27-2012 at 09:04 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Thanks so much
    When Koda mis behaves (in any way) on walks, a sharp quick tug upward on the leash is what i have alwlays done, it usually works!... but i have found it very hard to control him like this when he is being reactive to dogs. Authough i havnt been doing it before he reacts... so i will give it a shot

  6. #6

    Default

    Good luck! If you can get him before, that will probably help, a lot!

    Remember, start at a distance if you need to.

    Also, when I first started working on my dogs ignoring other dogs. I would give a nice quick pop, when they'd look at me, I'd reward them as fast as I could while trying to make sure they don't react again. It worked well, sometimes.

    GOOD LUCK! and keep us updated. Use treats as well if it'll help.

  7. #7

    Default

    I agree in that if it's fear based it will be a lot easier to manage. I have actually found that as Sammy gets older (he is now over 2 years old too) he has become less tolerant of other large males (fortunately he all but ignores small dogs). I was always told by trainers and breeders alike that by the time he was 3, he would not like other males (it's even in some breed descriptions for dobermans). Now this doesn't mean he's reactive to them walking down the street, he will walk nicely past any dog, even one trying to attack him. But these days I wouldn't leave him alone with another adult large male dog (he's fine with puppies). You'd never know it if you saw him because he doesn't react at all when I'm interacting with him (walking, playing or training), but I have seen a change in him and have had to intervene a few times when I have let him play with males he enjoyed playing with in the past, because he starts to get a bit silly and I don't want to risk it escalating. He is entire, but I have been told it's not uncommon for dogs to not like strange dogs of the same gender even when desexed. He is wonderful with females...

    Do you know was the kelpie a girl? Does he react to all dogs or just some? And what does he actually do when he sees another dog?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    I agree in that if it's fear based it will be a lot easier to manage. I have actually found that as Sammy gets older (he is now over 2 years old too) he has become less tolerant of other large males (fortunately he all but ignores small dogs). I was always told by trainers and breeders alike that by the time he was 3, he would not like other males (it's even in some breed descriptions for dobermans). Now this doesn't mean he's reactive to them walking down the street, he will walk nicely past any dog, even one trying to attack him. But these days I wouldn't leave him alone with another adult large male dog (he's fine with puppies). You'd never know it if you saw him because he doesn't react at all when I'm interacting with him (walking, playing or training), but I have seen a change in him and have had to intervene a few times when I have let him play with males he enjoyed playing with in the past, because he starts to get a bit silly and I don't want to risk it escalating. He is entire, but I have been told it's not uncommon for dogs to not like strange dogs of the same gender even when desexed. He is wonderful with females...

    Do you know was the kelpie a girl? Does he react to all dogs or just some? And what does he actually do when he sees another dog?
    hmmmm... now i think about it i am not sure whether it is fear based or not.... ugh...
    Koda is desexed... just thought i would mention that...
    The kelpie was an entire male... so it has nothing to do with gender...
    Koda only reacts to (most) dogs that are the same size/bigger than him... anything small and he just desperately wants to play (in fact today he was playing with an entire male toy poodle... no trouble at all)

    pretty much when another dog is around Koda, stares a lot... then starts growling... then that will escilate to barking and sometimes he will lunge at the dog.
    His tail is never down, it is usually in the normal position or lifted higher... and it is often wagging...
    after the dog is gone... koda is always really jumpy for a while afterwards... he often barks at the tiniest noise that scared him.
    i have noticed with some dogs... koda is really excited, and i will let him go up to the dog... he will sniff it for roughly 5 seconds or less, then just goes mental trying to attack it :fear:

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    I agree in that if it's fear based it will be a lot easier to manage. I have actually found that as Sammy gets older (he is now over 2 years old too) he has become less tolerant of other large males (fortunately he all but ignores small dogs). I was always told by trainers and breeders alike that by the time he was 3, he would not like other males (it's even in some breed descriptions for dobermans). Now this doesn't mean he's reactive to them walking down the street, he will walk nicely past any dog, even one trying to attack him. But these days I wouldn't leave him alone with another adult large male dog (he's fine with puppies). You'd never know it if you saw him because he doesn't react at all when I'm interacting with him (walking, playing or training), but I have seen a change in him and have had to intervene a few times when I have let him play with males he enjoyed playing with in the past, because he starts to get a bit silly and I don't want to risk it escalating. He is entire, but I have been told it's not uncommon for dogs to not like strange dogs of the same gender even when desexed. He is wonderful with females...

    Do you know was the kelpie a girl? Does he react to all dogs or just some? And what does he actually do when he sees another dog?
    Really? You were told by the time he was 3 he would not like other males? How interesting.

    Barney is 7 and entire....he loves other males LMAO.....I mean really loves them, over females. In saying that, all the males he has met have been desexed, not sure how he would go with another entire male but he LOVES them...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Really? You were told by the time he was 3 he would not like other males? How interesting.

    Barney is 7 and entire....he loves other males LMAO.....I mean really loves them, over females. In saying that, all the males he has met have been desexed, not sure how he would go with another entire male but he LOVES them...
    lol forgot to mention... that kelpie that was at my house... Koda reeaaalllyyyy liked him... lol... he was humping him... or trying to...
    Koda has only ever done that to one other dog who was a desexed male... the first time koda met him, he was agressive towards him... the second time... he humped him.... the third time... he was agressive again... this particular dog died not long ago...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •