Page 8 of 13 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 129

Thread: Smack !!!

  1. #71

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    Dont wanna get involved in your little 'chat' between you girls .....but that was pretty bloody impressive Bec. Well done.!!
    LOL, thanks!

    Now I'm off to have some wine, no bourbon or scotch in this house

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Bundaberg QLD
    Posts
    3,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pinkest View Post
    Well, girls may drink scotch and coke, but women drink bourbon. On ice.

    Good call Pinkest !!! Good call. Bloody 'like' button has dissapered. Ya made me laugh.


    Quote Originally Posted by reyzor View Post
    Education is important, but big biceps are more importanter ...
    DONT SIC YOUR DOGMA ON ME !

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Bourbon neat here. In my house you do not ruin good whiskey with water, ice or lolly water!!!!

    Bec's achievements with Daisy ARE awesome. Particularly since (and Bec I hope I'm not out of line here) Daisy began as a dog who just wanted to have her nose down scenting (beagle!!) and certainly presented Bec with challenges in the beginning. Those clips don't give enough insight into the bloody hard work and commitment of the handler- and when you know that, the level of amazement just skyrockets.

    In terms of smacking- no I don't. I've found both my dogs hate being removed or isolated. Timeouts have been a staple in training. I've also used my e-collars to remotely intervened with some activities. It's usually a case of 1-2 reminders, problem fixed.

    I have hit Villi once though. Can't remember exactly what he did- but it involved not looking where he was going and crashing in to me- he did knock me down. Once I was down, he tried to bounce on me 'hey! What happenin? Lemme help'... And I shoved him off- hard- with an open hand. Since that day he has been significantly more careful, so whilst I dont condone or like what I did, it was efficient.

  4. #74

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Bourbon neat here. In my house you do not ruin good whiskey with water, ice or lolly water!!!!

    Bec's achievements with Daisy ARE awesome. Particularly since (and Bec I hope I'm not out of line here) Daisy began as a dog who just wanted to have her nose down scenting (beagle!!) and certainly presented Bec with challenges in the beginning. Those clips don't give enough insight into the bloody hard work and commitment of the handler- and when you know that, the level of amazement just skyrockets.
    That's so nice of you to say V&F! You certainly learn a lot handling the more difficult dogs.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    They are different but often use to curb similar unwanted behaviours.

    I wasn't saying dominance is resource guarding, I said it is the control of a resource. I don't mean by aggressive or physical means. I agree a dog that guards is not what I would deem to be a "leader" or dominant over that resource, it means they are insecure. A dog who is in control of the resource doesn't need to guard it because they can get it when they want.
    This is where people get it wrong, they think they have to be aggressive or physical with their dog to prove they are the "leader" when in fact to the dog it just makes you look insecure because leaders don't need to use physical force or aggression to lead. All you need to do to be the leader is control the resources, which is easy enough, we control a dogs whole life including when they eat, what they eat, how much they eat, water access, bedding and sleeping spots, toys and playtime etc and we don't need to do it with force.

    I also agree *some* dogs can be born as a truly dominant dog but they are few and far between.
    LOL, you havent been to my house. We only control one thing here...food. The rest (water, bedding, sleeping, toys, playtime) is a free for all LMAO. Not really, may as well be.

    Just commenting on that coz it made me chuckle a bit.

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    Omg I'll take a picture so you can see what I mean, he loves his head pats and if you stop and you were doing a good job you'll get whacked with the paw. He just moves his ears as your hand approaches and pushes his head into your hand. I have never seen Sammy scared to be honest and if you hug him and he likes you, he will wrap his head around your neck to hug you back (and I know they say most dogs don't like to be hugged, I know I've never had one that did before).

    Some dogs are naturally more dominant than others - they consider it to be a more valuable resource and think they have what it takes to get it I guess. We've had a lot of dogs in the family. The 2 GSD's and the doberman have been the most dominant - most likely to not listen to strangers, least likely to roll over when challenged by dogs and/or strangers, the papillons and the rottie have been the most submissive. That is what I am referring to when I say dominant, but maybe what I should say is confidence? You know it's like at our dog training club, some dogs are scared to chase the larger toys and mostly walk with their tail down. So they use tiny feathery toys for those dogs to try engage with them and even lie down on the ground so the dog feels less threatened by the exercise. Sammy will chase anything - you can charge him with a bean bag like I did last night (what was I thinking?) and he will rear up and take you on. They say Sammy would make a good personal protection dog and obviously not all dogs do, so they just have different personalities. I might be misusing the word dominant though because I have seen several debates on the subject and none have ever really been conclusive.

    I am not teaching him self-control, we own dogs not robots. Sammy could never be left to babysit a rabbit, in fact I don't leave him unsupervised with anything. His drives are what give him his fast and flashy responses in obedience that win us the high points - I love that about him. It is up to me to stop him from being in those situations where he can be himself in ways that would be socially unacceptable or worse, dangerous. I am teaching him (well have taught him since he's now passed grade 5 obedience and most parts of a BH title) that he always has to listen to me when I'm there. If I take him out of the house and want to go to breakfast at a nice cafe, I need to know that he's not going to take off after some dog/person/lame seagull etc and sure enough, I have a dog who now just lies under my chair - unless he's managed to seduce the waitress in which case he'll have his head resting on her while she pats him and tells him in a sooky voice that she shouldn't be patting dogs whilst working...
    Who says most dogs dont like hugs? I have never heard that...my guys love them. Pippi is actually full on cuddling me right now.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    LOL, you havent been to my house. We only control one thing here...food. The rest (water, bedding, sleeping, toys, playtime) is a free for all LMAO. Not really, may as well be.

    Just commenting on that coz it made me chuckle a bit.
    Pretty much the same here, Lala. Though the ability to open doors is also a very powerful skill that the dog doesn't have.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    1,828

    Default

    LOL, I don't drink spirits or wine and girly drinks are just too sweet for me.....Now Sean, as long as you only own a couple of items, it's all good, just hope the wife doesn't come home one day to find you sashaying around in one of her frocks lol.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Gawd is that You, Bec? I didn't recognise the the Nic. Erm not that you'd guess mine on the Dark side, unless familiar with "Keeping up appearances".

    welcome.

    So back on the "I'll do what I like with my dogs - it's not abuse"...

    Isn't it wrong to punish without first teaching what you do want, and isn't it wrong to punish a dog that is doing nothing wrong right now? If the punishment (applied aversive) does not come during or with in a few seconds of the misdeed - the dog is not going to make the connection.

    Imagine if it happend to you. You were sitting quietly at home and the council ranger suddenly barged in, grabbed you by the neck, dragged you to the toilet and shoved your nose in it. And for good measure growled and yelled at you in some language you didn't understand. What would you learn by that? Would you connect it to the dog poo you didn't pick up on the off lead oval? Wasn't even your dog's poo...

    And it is wrong to say a dog thinks like a naughty teenager. The scientists have measured their thinking/emotional ability to be closer to a 2 year old human when it comes to understanding the consequences of their actions. So as I said before - if a 2 yo human wouldn't understand - the dog won't either. Not that a dog has the same motivations or concepts as a human.

    Dogs' Intelligence On Par With Two-year-old Human, Canine Researcher Says

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Logan, Brisbane QLD
    Posts
    806

    Default

    I don't punish unless i catch them in the act doing it. Having 6 animals in the house makes it hard to do any sort of guessing.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •