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Thread: Maremma X Rottweiler?

  1. #11

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    Definetly would not recommend either breed as a first time dog. I have trained and know a number of both breeds and they are hard work. Combined as a mix, well I would not like to speculate.

    Glad you changed your mind.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  2. #12
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    Maremmas are not pets. They're not likely to do anything you want by way of companionship. They're for guarding their sheep in the field. And they do it without human intervention or help.

    Rottweilers - especially when puppies, you have to be very careful you do not damage them with too much exercise as they are a big breed prone to joint problems. My dog and a rotti were puppies in the same class at club and she wouldn't let it walk for more than 10 minutes at a time, so we couldn't make it one block before we had to turn around. And they're not the best jogging companion even when fully grown.

    So a cross of a dog that won't be interested in jogging with you with a dog that will fall to bits if you go jogging with it - I can't see how this could be the right dog for you. If you want a dog that will make sure nobody, including you, messes with any of the sheep in your back yard, it might be great.

  3. #13
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    PS i merged the threads as we only need one.

  4. #14
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    run. faaaar away from this.

    That litter should never have happened frankly. Two totally different breeds, one a livestock guardian the other a guarding breed. Neither for the first time owner, or the cross either. Look into something more suitable with a stable temperament, what you seem to be after is something like a nice lower drive border collie etc.

  5. #15

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    Thanks for your help guys.
    We didn't end up going.
    I explained to the owner that we're unsuitable both geographically and personally for the puppy.
    I searched and searched for information on that kind of cross but couldn't find anything anywhere - probably because it's not a wise cross by the sounds of things.
    We're going to wait a bit and take our time with a decision.
    I've always wanted an Alaskan Malamute though - what are people's thoughts on this breed?

  6. #16
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    I am certainly not against crosses, and have no purist attitudes towards any dog or dog breed but i agree with with natty here, crossing 2 extremely protective breeds? I am not sure what exactly they are trying to achieve, but then i dont know enough about either of these breeds to comment, and certainly havent had any experience of the cross to comment.

    I will disagree with you Crested on your comment ....
    Look at a pedigree and if there are champions or grand champions in every generation then you can be fairly certain those dogs didn't have major problems (temperament wise). And aggressive or timid dog in the show ring would be kicked out and never gain its title so you can make a judgement without actually physically seeing the dogs relatives. The same goes for agility titles too for those who don't like conformation shows.

    i have seen dogs that can barely function, breathe or walk win championship titles, a show dog or champion in show does is NOT a good indicator of health, functionality or temperment, .
    I have seen dogs growl and attempt to bite judges and still win champion, and i have seen obviously unhealthy dogs win champion, as even today in 2012, dogs do not need health testing to breed or show under ANKC regulations,

    It is of course different for the sport of agility, as they are generally always bred for functionality and health.

    IMO, (i just learned that), the only dogs you can be assured of health, temperment and functionality are those breeders who breed for the well being of the dog and breed, and the show environment, a healthy dog, with a great temperment but lacking somewhat in appearance is not going to win the title.
    But an unhealthy one (inside) with a not so good temperment, but has perfect appearance can win.

    I am not suggesting all show dogs are unhealthy,only that there is more incentive to breed for appearance than health if you follow the sport of showing.

    It' no different than the sport of horse racing, or greyhound racing or even football........theres good and bad in all sports.
    But they are definately not all good.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Maremmas are not pets. They're not likely to do anything you want by way of companionship. They're for guarding their sheep in the field. And they do it without human intervention or help.

    Rottweilers - especially when puppies, you have to be very careful you do not damage them with too much exercise as they are a big breed prone to joint problems. My dog and a rotti were puppies in the same class at club and she wouldn't let it walk for more than 10 minutes at a time, so we couldn't make it one block before we had to turn around. And they're not the best jogging companion even when fully grown.

    So a cross of a dog that won't be interested in jogging with you with a dog that will fall to bits if you go jogging with it - I can't see how this could be the right dog for you. If you want a dog that will make sure nobody, including you, messes with any of the sheep in your back yard, it might be great.
    I understand that larger breeds are unable to walk more than 10 - 15 mins at a time because of joint growth issues, but do you know why?
    Until this site, I had never heard of this before and large breed pups i have had in the past have run and walked long distances with no ill effects, just curious as to why this is suggested with large breeds?
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  8. #18
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    cavalierqld...

    the rule of thumb I got told - way after it was too late... was 5 minutes exercise per month of age in one go.

    The Rotti's owner's breeder told her to be careful.

    I also had similar info about human children - ie not to over do the exercise when they're young and not done growing because it can wear the joints out before they're done growing ie it's like playing football on a lawn that has only started growing this week - you stuff it up. But if you wait till it's fully grown and covering all the ground - you can play football without doing long term damage - if that makes sense.

    It has to do with allowing growth to complete before excessive wear and tear is applied. Some exercise is important, but you can over do it in animals that are not done growing. And even with adult dogs (and other animals), it's a good idea to build up gradually. Don't ask a dog to bike with you 5km - the first time out. They would have a hard time of it, same as if you asked any unfit human.

    With humans - it would probably be a good idea to prevent children playing elite level sport (eg AFL football) before they're fully grown... ie I feel a bit sick when I see 16 to 18 yo playing AFL. They're crippled by the time they're 30, that's if they make it through the first season. Same with 16 yo tennis players. If they don't pace themselves, their joints are bone on bone by the time they're 30. And 2 yo race horses. So wrong.

  9. #19
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    Thank you for that Hyacinth, I had never heard the cautions till here, but then i have never owned a large breed puppy (except the puppy in a box), and my large rescue and fosters have all been older.

    It really makes you think....my daughter played Local state/national level basketball from age 8, she is in her late 20's and has joint dramas.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  10. #20
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    my daughter played Local state/national level basketball from age 8, she is in her late 20's and has joint dramas.
    Yup that's the one. I knew an orthopod who was treating a 16yo for arthritus caused by too much exercise - on hard surfaces. Was doing 6 to 8 hours of tennis a day and wondered why she was falling to bits. And didn't want to give any of it up either. Nuts.

    And recently I saw a kid - maybe 11 yo? Very small and skinny, doing laps around a football field before tennis pracitce/tournament. With her dad standing over her and pushing her to go around again. I think she did 10 to 15 laps while I was watching. Not good.

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