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Thread: Does size really matter?

  1. #1
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    Default Does size really matter?

    The more I think on it, and the more dogs I peruse while awaiting the day when I can finally go look for my precious pooch, the more I begin to think I don't really care what size the dog is. When I first started looking, I felt that a little dog would fit best with our family, but now I'm thinking it is more important that the dog is gentle, lower energy and is content with a smallish garden. I'm not talking giants - I couldn't afford to feed a massive dog, but I know there are some breeds, like greyhounds, that can be low energy in the house.

    Since my dog will be a rescue, it will most likely be a mixed breed and while I know the foster carers will give me a better insight as to the individuals personality, I would like to know, what breeds/ mixes I would be wise to avoid (I assume herding dogs) and which would be the low energy, easy going type.

  2. #2
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    It really is hard to tell with crossbreeds. I was adamant I would avoid any working breed cross when I looked for my last dog, yet the only breed that I am sure Banjo has in her mix is kelpie! Yet, she seems to be happy with less exercise than my old sighthound, though that also has something to do with the fact that I had oodles of time to walk the hound back then, so got her used to lots of outings. But I've had none of the issues that I would have expected from a working dog cross.

    Can't really think of any others that you should try avoid really. Best to just keep an open mind, read some descriptions, look at their photos and then go by what the foster carers say, I reckon.

    I can however highly recommend sighthound crosses. The only thing I can think of is that they can be a bit oversensitive sometimes - though someone may want to correct me on that, as it could have just been mine. I mean, things like separation anxiety and fear of loud noises. But rare for them to develop annoying habits like nuisance barking or jumping up or excessive chewing. Then again, avid chasers, so if you want a dog to walk off leash, you'll need to use your smarts to achieve a reliable recall even when they see something to chase. And they do like a good sprint of course.

  3. #3

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    nah, personality is much more important ... at least thats my claim

    but seriously, unless you want a guard dog, i don't see how a big dog is better than a small dog - i like bull breeds for their personalities not anything to do with size(jack is only 16kg).

  4. #4
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    What about with cats and small animals, I would imagine instict would kick in when one of my cats comes darting past a sighthound? But then I guess that depends on how they have been raised also.

  5. #5
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    I'd like to state that it's not so much the energy or size of the dog, but how much time you're willing to put into mentally and physically exercising it each day. If you won't have a lot of time, then working dogs, utility dogs and herding dogs aren't the way to go. While it doesn't matter so much about size it does come into consideration. If your car can handle a big dog and the inside of your house can handle a big dog, then I don't see a problem with getting a big dog. If you think it will be too cramped then looking at small to medium breeds is the way forward.

    Rescue group dogs are awesome because you can get a detailed report on their personality, any behavioural problems they may have and a lot of rescue groups have trial periods and free help during this time to help the new dog settle into your home, to see if it is the right dog for you.

    I always suggest fostering in the beginning. That way you can see what it's like having a dog in your family without the MAJOR commitment to begin with. If the dog is the one for you and fits into your lifestyle then you can adopt it. If not, then you send it to it's forever home and start with the next one. It also gives you a chance to experience living with different size/energy level/breed dogs to see what you prefer

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asrais View Post
    What about with cats and small animals, I would imagine instict would kick in when one of my cats comes darting past a sighthound? But then I guess that depends on how they have been raised also.
    If you have cats then checking with the rescue group for a dog that gets along with cats is a must!

  7. #7
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    Sighthounds can co-exist perfectly with cats. Mine did. Although it took a few scratches on the nose before she understood who was boss. But after that she was fine with my friend's cat when he looked after her too. But you would always have to be careful about strange cats outside. But then, that really isn't purely a sighthound issue, as Banjo has taught me!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Sighthounds can co-exist perfectly with cats. Mine did. Although it took a few scratches on the nose before she understood who was boss. But after that she was fine with my friend's cat when he looked after her too. But you would always have to be careful about strange cats outside. But then, that really isn't purely a sighthound issue, as Banjo has taught me!
    The cats outside are fair game - bloody things use my garden as a toilet! (joke, I wouldn't let my dog chase them in case he got hurt, the dog that is)

    I am not choosing large over small, I am just not that concerned about size any more. I just want the perfect dog for us.

    Fostering is something I am definately considering.

  9. #9
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    Foster and fail ....Or if you don't get on with the dog for keeps, you have still helped the dog.

    To me size does matter LOL........Hence I have four big ones. Food is not the expensive part....medications/weight is the killer. I have a total of 230kg of dogs, that is expensive in worm tablets/heartworm and if I had to use anything else that went by weight
    Pets are forever

  10. #10
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    Hi,

    I have a bit of a bias for bull breeds, but I think that your original idea of a greyhound is a good one. Most greyhounds are laid back couch potatoes and might possibly be just what you are looking for (or I might be completely wrong.....).

    good luck with whatever you decide.

    Cheers,

    ricey

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