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Thread: Help choosing dog

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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    Get your $$$$'s ready .....Toolers are quite expensive
    How much are we talking? The answer to this question could make my decision very easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    That might be a whole nother thread, and a couple of books. But I struggle with the answer daily. Essentially - only reward (with attention, pats, food, praise etc) what behaviours you do want, and ignore or stop (collar grab, lead on, relocate) behaviours you don't want. Avoid punishment as much as possible because it's hard to get the dog to understand what is being punished.

    Beware of rewarding stuff that's cute or funny in a puppy but dangerous or illegal in an adult dog eg charging up to strangers (dogs and people) uninvited. And worse - jumping on them.

    It's a bit like the kid who says - you never told me not to run across the road without checking for cars. Ok you never said I couldn't "skip" across the road instead. But Boss, there was a cat there in desperate need of my "help". But Boss, it's not a road, it's a railway track...
    Thanks for your help. I'll keep all of that in mind.

  2. #32
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    Well, there you go...I have never heard of the nova scotia duck retriever, had to get my friend google to find one for me. Live and learn, thank you Hyacinth!
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  3. #33
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    The ones I'm familiar with are from this prefix
    Sherbrooke Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers

    They're in Adelaide so I guess that figures. Most of the ones I've met have been successful in competition obedience and agility. But I've also met a couple of "family pets" (not sure their breeders) that have fun at the beach and pull on lead (dog is training owner to come where towed).

    No idea the prices expected, and it's likely to get you crossed off the prospective puppy placements if that's the first question you ask. It's not a stupid question, just shouldn't be your first consideration. If it is, then maybe a rescue from petrescue or RSPCA would suit you better. Mind you, for a pedigree dog - price over $2500 - I'd be walking away, because I'd be thinking they're in it for the profit not the breed quality. Happens a lot with "rare" blue Staffies. And if a puppy does cost you more than $1500 - I would not be talking about it to anybody. Cos people nick puppies they think are valuable. Tollers have the advantage of being mistaken for red Border Collies by people who don't know any better (me a few years ago).

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    The ones I'm familiar with are from this prefix
    Sherbrooke Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers

    They're in Adelaide so I guess that figures. Most of the ones I've met have been successful in competition obedience and agility. But I've also met a couple of "family pets" (not sure their breeders) that have fun at the beach and pull on lead (dog is training owner to come where towed).

    No idea the prices expected, and it's likely to get you crossed off the prospective puppy placements if that's the first question you ask. It's not a stupid question, just shouldn't be your first consideration. If it is, then maybe a rescue from petrescue or RSPCA would suit you better. Mind you, for a pedigree dog - price over $2500 - I'd be walking away, because I'd be thinking they're in it for the profit not the breed quality. Happens a lot with "rare" blue Staffies. And if a puppy does cost you more than $1500 - I would not be talking about it to anybody. Cos people nick puppies they think are valuable. Tollers have the advantage of being mistaken for red Border Collies by people who don't know any better (me a few years ago).
    I understand that it's a living thing (and will be worth much more than any amount of money once I get to know it) and that asking for price first is a bad idea, but money doesn't grow on trees!
    I'm probably willing to pay up to about $1600 for the dog (possibly a little more if necessary), and if the Tollers cost very much more than a Brittany, then I don't see why I'd go past the Brittany.

    And I'll take your advice about not telling anyone if it costs that much. That's pretty worrying to hear.

  5. #35

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    I have two medium to large shedding breeds (GSD cross and Aussie Shepherd) plus asthma and allergies, they are indoors, we have carpet, and I have no issue. Trees make me cough, not dog fur.

    I know a number of brittanys and a number of tollers and they are both VERY energetic breeds. You might find the occasional one who is lazy but in general they need a job to do! Pretty much everyone I know with either breed does obedience/agility/flyball. To be honest ALL the ones I know like to think for themselves and can be positively naughty

  6. #36
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    Mmmm... For my 2 cents worth; both the Brittanys and Tollers are quite active hunting breeds and both are likely to require high levels of physical and mental stimulation. Both would be ok as outside dogs (given appropriate shelter/ shade etc) but have you considered the time spent on grooming? Both the Brittany's and Tollers are suggested as being 'wanderers' if not stimulated sufficiently- do you have a largeish yard with good fencing?

    I'm very much like Beloz- I think dogs do so much better when allowed indoors- so if your dog is to be outside only, will you be willing to spend heaps of time outdoors with him/her? Very few dogs do well alone in the yard separated from their humans for long periods.

    In terms of allergies- I think you really need to know what you are allergic to? Is it the hair, dander, saliva, dust in the coat? This bit of info will really dictate your choices.

    I'll strongly second Hyacinth's suggestion- go along to a few dog shows. Talk to breeders and see the dogs first hand. Test your allergy response as well as getting info about the breed- you never know what you might find that you didn't expect!!

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wuffles View Post
    I have two medium to large shedding breeds (GSD cross and Aussie Shepherd) plus asthma and allergies, they are indoors, we have carpet, and I have no issue. Trees make me cough, not dog fur.

    I know a number of brittanys and a number of tollers and they are both VERY energetic breeds. You might find the occasional one who is lazy but in general they need a job to do! Pretty much everyone I know with either breed does obedience/agility/flyball. To be honest ALL the ones I know like to think for themselves and can be positively naughty
    I think that I'm allergic to the dander, mainly.

    It'll have some space to run around outside, so hopefully it'll be occupied and use that energy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Mmmm... For my 2 cents worth; both the Brittanys and Tollers are quite active hunting breeds and both are likely to require high levels of physical and mental stimulation. Both would be ok as outside dogs (given appropriate shelter/ shade etc) but have you considered the time spent on grooming? Both the Brittany's and Tollers are suggested as being 'wanderers' if not stimulated sufficiently- do you have a largeish yard with good fencing?

    I'm very much like Beloz- I think dogs do so much better when allowed indoors- so if your dog is to be outside only, will you be willing to spend heaps of time outdoors with him/her? Very few dogs do well alone in the yard separated from their humans for long periods.

    In terms of allergies- I think you really need to know what you are allergic to? Is it the hair, dander, saliva, dust in the coat? This bit of info will really dictate your choices.

    I'll strongly second Hyacinth's suggestion- go along to a few dog shows. Talk to breeders and see the dogs first hand. Test your allergy response as well as getting info about the breed- you never know what you might find that you didn't expect!!
    Grooming should be fine. There are five of us in the household, so we can spread the work. And, yes, I have a 'largeish' yard with very good fencing.

    I'll let the dog inside if it's uncomfortable (cold or wet nights mainly, I guess), and I'll consider letting it inside during the day. Although I do think it'll be happiest with the extra space and freedom outside.

    To be honest, I'm not entirely sure what I'm allergic to, but I believe that it's mainly the dander.

    I'll definitely see if I can go to a few shows. But I think that I'll be fine unless it's a dog that's particularly bad for allergies, which the breeds that I'm considering aren't. My allergy isn't too bad.

    Also, any opinions on the Labradoodle? I don't personally like its long coat, but it's very quickly become a favourite in the family.
    Last edited by This name is invalid; 05-07-2012 at 04:29 PM.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by This name is invalid View Post
    It'll have some space to run around outside, so hopefully it'll be occupied and use that energy..
    First let me say I'm NOT trying to be argumentative!! *grin* BUT I tend to think this can be a thinking trap lots of people fall into, especially with hunting/herding/high energy breeds. Without heaps of mental stimulation (this comes from you or family members interacting with the dog), you are more likely to end up with a destructive, barking, unhappy maniac. Physical exercise is needed, but even then, lots of dogs need a reason (read: a human) to get up and exercise mind and body. Otherwise they lie about bored out of their brains with the occasional manic destructive episode in between.

    On the subject of Labradoodles.... Look, I'll just say read and research carefully, be prepared to get a dog with any or all of the Lab or Poodle traits and again be prepared for either lots of shedding, or lots of grooming and clipping. I've never met a calm Lab-doodle, but I'm sure that does not mean they don't exist- obviously!

  9. #39
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    Labradoodles coats can vary quite considerably, they can have a fleece coat (like an angora goat), a hair coat (like the Lab) or a wooly coast (like the poodle).
    There are also variations in the breed standard size from about 7 - 30 kg, minature, medium and standard .

    They are extremely clever, sociable, comical and energetic dogs quiet when handled. They are generally very happy with a friendly manner, keen and easy to train. They, like with labradors should display an intuition about their family members or handler’s current emotional state or needs. This ability to “know” is what has made the Australian Labradoodle an excellent dog for individuals with special needs.
    They do require training and can be quite destructive as puppies, and sometimes tale a little extra time to mature but make great children and family pets. Like many other dogs, they will need ongoing grooming or clipping.
    There is actually a ALA (Australian Labradoodle assoc) that claims, to have a code of ethics for members and registers litters, but as with other breed groups I imagine they would be the same with no consequences for "breaking the code" nor is it mandatory to do health checks and they dont care how many dogs they own and breed from.
    The onus will be on you as with any breed to find someone who cares more for the breed and the individual dogs, than the money.

    But good breeders are out there, you just need to take the time to find them.
    Good luck
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  10. #40
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    My only comment... you said you didn't like the poodle and a lab wasn't for you... why on earth would contemplate a mix of both?

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

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