Page 11 of 31 FirstFirst ... 91011121321 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 110 of 305

Thread: Help choosing dog

  1. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuri_89 View Post
    I don't want him to go out and get a dog tomorrow for heaven sake, great your willing to do your research but this is going absolutely nowhere. Your idea's and posts are all over the place. I'm concerned that if your family decided on a dog and it was not at your expectation - what would happen to it?
    That's why I'm being so thorough in deciding - because I want it to be at our expectations.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuri_89 View Post
    You've been told a Lab would be no good for your allergies so i would give up on that idea.
    But my allergies are not that bad. I was basing it on when we last owned a dog, which was a long time ago now. As I've said, they seem to have subdued with age.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuri_89 View Post
    Hya has already suggested you go and check out some clubs, this way you can gauge how bad your allergies are, and observe behaviors of breeds that you like. If your too busy to check it out as you stated, then you are not committed enough and therefore your too busy for a dog - surely of the 5 of you, somebody can make an effort to attend.
    It's only been a week since then. As I said, I will try to attend sometime soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuri_89 View Post
    Now you need to tell us:

    - How much training are you willing to put in. Are you going to take your puppy to pre-school or dog to obedience?
    - Amount of exercise time you are willing to allocate your new dog
    - Grooming
    - How much time alone at home will it spend? (you don't want a breed that doesn't do well alone for long periods of time)

    I agree bunny girl. It is an emotional decision and shouldn't be all about the check list. Took me 8 months to get my pooch after making the decision that we wanted a dog. No checklists for me, just looking for that connection.
    Good idea. Okay, let's see...

    - I am willing to spend about an hour each weekday to train it, and longer on weekends. I'm sure that it will get additional attention and training from the rest of the family as well. I can take it to puppy school if you recommend.
    - About an hour a week day day, a bit more on weekends
    - As much as it needs, really, I'm not too fussed. Ideally, a few brushes a week would be good.
    - To be honest, I'm not really sure. There is pretty much someone home all of the time, but not always outside when the dog is outside. A dog that copes okay when by itself for a little while would be good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    This is the RSPCA policy on petshops
    What is the RSPCA policy on pet shops? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    ACA does not actually meet the RSCPA standards. They're nearly there, but the source of their puppies is a major worry. And their breeders don't meet the RSCPA responsible breeder criteria either.

    Person who answered the phone at the RSPCA clearly doesn't know what RSCPA's own info is. Plus RSPCA does not want to get sued for defamation. They would shut down the Gippland puppy mills but it's really hard to get a search warrant when they won't let anyone near the places.
    Okay, I understand. Thanks for that.

  2. #102

    Default

    Choosing pups really brings out the passion in folks. Not always a bad thing, but... yes no one likes puppy farms, many don't like petshops some like purebreds and some like crosses, some swear by rescue and others by breeders.

    But suggesting and guiding helps folks to learn and choose for themselves, not getting cross.

    Matt it seems there is many breeds and types of crossbreeds that would suit what you're looking for. However that leaves you with an overwhelming sort of situation. Maybe stop or slow down on looking for a few days, talk to the family and decide on a set list of wants and don't wants. It may well be that you find a dog and the list goes out the window. But it will give you some solid direction to start with, otherwise the flip flopping and indecision could make for a very frustrating process instead of an enjoyable one.

    Simple list ideas: medium size, medium coat and shedding, solid/medium build, low/moderate energy levels -etc etc.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,583

    Default

    I used to make a score for houses when I was looking. Ie +2points for the things it must have and -2 points for the things it must not have, and +1 point for each desirable but not mandatory thing, and -1 point each undesirable thing on my list.

    I found that if a house had all the good things on the list and none of the bad things it could score a max of 32 points, and if it had all bad things it would be -32 points. So a house that scored about 18 points I felt pretty good being in. Over 10 points was good. And I think I bought something with a score around +18. But that really helped me understand why I liked some houses better than others, and which houses not to bother looking at.

    You could make a list like that for the criteria you want your puppy to have. for me, number 1 on the list was friendly. number 2 (but not mandatory) was cattle dog or cattle dog x - but that's just because I've lived with a lot of those and I like them. I wanted a dog that I could lift when it was done growing eg <30kg when fully grown. And a girl dog - that was mandatory (more belly to rub, less likely to cock leg and pee on the vegies or other unwanted places). I liked blue colour over red, but the score on that would have been neutral, I'd take either. And I wanted a puppy ie up to about 8 months to maybe 1 year old and fluked a 10 week old puppy - that just happened to be there when I go there and the 6 month old red heeler x turned out to be adopted already and a boy dog not a girl dog like the website said...

    rescues and pounds are traumatic places to visit, so it pays to plan a few visits - not necessarily to adopt, but just to get used to the place, and have faith that all the other dogs available - will find the right homes for them if you leave them there. Ie much better to leave the dog there for their right person, than you take home the "wrong" dog.

    still thinking a beagle fits your criteria best so far of the purebreds. And they don't mind being outside dogs. They'd rather be in with you but they cope outside.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Ok Matt, I am sorry for posting whilst wearing my cranky hat.
    I have now had some snuggle time with the pooches and feel a lot better.

    In a nutshell: a cattledog:

    Is highly intelligent and easily trained.
    Can deal with time alone (as long as he has a vantage point to keep watch)
    keeping watch is working.
    Is well behaved inside with the family. Looking after the children is also working
    Likes being talked to and will quickly pick up and respond to words and phrases.
    Does shed like crazy twice a year but the hairs are NOT fine. Be prepared for some extra vacuuming.
    Is no more high energy than any other breed. All dogs need exercise.
    Is quiet, I have never had a barking issue ever.


    I have had the pleasure of owning (?) 2 cattle dogs.
    The first was an ex working dog 5 years old (Ozzy) who just moved in and became a sofa decoration.
    He was highly intelligent, loving, and a loyal bodyguard to his family and chosen friends.

    After he passed at 15, we bought a ACD puppy from a farmer we knew.
    Chubb was just a normal joyful puppy.
    We lived in a house on 700sq mtrs with no grass or yard to speak of.
    The whole back of the house was pool and tiled surrounds/decking.

    There was a nice off leash park just up the road so I walked him there,
    every morning and every evening and we would play and meet other dogs
    and owners from our street. He was happy with his two outings daily and also
    playtime at home with our kids.

    A common reason given for surrenders is - "he needs a bigger yard" or
    "he needs acreage so he can run around". This is utter rubbish.
    The dog needs love and attention, a walk and some playtime with his family.

    I have 2 cattle dog rescues here at the moment.
    After all they have been through, they are still loving and joyful and it will be hard
    to part with them, one is adopted already and the other is not physically strong enough yet.
    They have been no trouble at all, they ask for very little, just a meal and a hug, a walk
    or ball game. They wait patiently and quietly, not a whimper, ever, until I go to them with the
    leash or ball and then the ears prick up and the tails go wild with delight.

    I hope you find a dog that can bring this joy to your family.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Matt may not go about making this decision in a way that you would but I think there have been some overreactions here. I for one am quite impressed about him not getting the potential puppy farm dog based on the advice he was given here. Lots of people would have just gone ahead.

    It is important to remember that most of the people who post here are a bit dog crazy, tend to know their breeds or know where to get reliable info on them and have a good idea about what to expect when you get a new dog or pup. People who have not owned a dog before just don't have that background knowledge and it can take a while to get your head round it. And this is probably exactly why Matt came here. Unlike me, who got my first dog on a whim without any research or knowledge at all. And then chose my second dog based on that experience.

    But I second the taking a step back and letting it all sink in, Matt.

    ETA: And I think no first dog owner really knows exactly what they are committing to. Bit like becoming a parent. Nothing really prepares you. My first dog wasn't an ideal match for me but I still loved her to bits and tried to make her happy until she died.
    Last edited by Beloz; 05-11-2012 at 10:48 PM.

  6. #106

    Default

    Beloz.. I also got mine on a whim, had no idea what he was. I wouldn't change him for the world <insert love heart>

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bunbury
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I worked out what size and style of dog we wanted. My partner was keen for a medium size ( he is very tall). I was keen for intelligence as training and interacting with the dog is important for me. I didn't actually want long hair but fell in love and added extra grooming instantly into the equation!
    I have bought books, talked to people, trawled through this forums postings and asked questions.
    I am very happy with my choice but she suits me! I have a lot to learn but so I did when my first child arrived!
    You will need to make the decision knowing that once you buy that dog his/her wellbeing is your responsibility for the next 12 - 20 years? Your children may well be adults when she finishes her span. I find that length of commitment daunting and so should we all. We also know it is worth it.

  8. #108

    Default

    Matt, I have the ideal dog for you. It is a toy and you will find it at Toy'sR US - just kidding.

    The Toller is a good dog. I have trained a few in our agility club and found them friendly, intelligent, easy to train but energetic. You will need to train the retrieve so you can throw a tennis ball for her/him.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Wow this thread has taken on a life of its own, a lot of great helpful info and a lot of over anal-izing.

    Matt - good on you for taking the time to find a dog that fits your family but at the end of the day...if you choose the dog for temperment and level of activity and maintainance then a dog is a dog no matter what colour or type.
    But as you know, you will be helping dogs everywhere in the long run by choosing not to buy from a large profit kennel.
    And after all your thought, you may just walk into a rescue and find your lifelong family member in the form of something small and fluffy or tall and wirey and nothing like what you had imagined.....and be very happy with your choice.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Choosing pups really brings out the passion in folks. Not always a bad thing, but... yes no one likes puppy farms, many don't like petshops some like purebreds and some like crosses, some swear by rescue and others by breeders.

    But suggesting and guiding helps folks to learn and choose for themselves, not getting cross.

    Matt it seems there is many breeds and types of crossbreeds that would suit what you're looking for. However that leaves you with an overwhelming sort of situation. Maybe stop or slow down on looking for a few days, talk to the family and decide on a set list of wants and don't wants. It may well be that you find a dog and the list goes out the window. But it will give you some solid direction to start with, otherwise the flip flopping and indecision could make for a very frustrating process instead of an enjoyable one.

    Simple list ideas: medium size, medium coat and shedding, solid/medium build, low/moderate energy levels -etc etc.
    Yeah, you're right, and thanks. I'll slow down and discuss, make a list and hopefully we'll get somewhere!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I used to make a score for houses when I was looking. Ie +2points for the things it must have and -2 points for the things it must not have, and +1 point for each desirable but not mandatory thing, and -1 point each undesirable thing on my list.

    I found that if a house had all the good things on the list and none of the bad things it could score a max of 32 points, and if it had all bad things it would be -32 points. So a house that scored about 18 points I felt pretty good being in. Over 10 points was good. And I think I bought something with a score around +18. But that really helped me understand why I liked some houses better than others, and which houses not to bother looking at.

    You could make a list like that for the criteria you want your puppy to have. for me, number 1 on the list was friendly. number 2 (but not mandatory) was cattle dog or cattle dog x - but that's just because I've lived with a lot of those and I like them. I wanted a dog that I could lift when it was done growing eg <30kg when fully grown. And a girl dog - that was mandatory (more belly to rub, less likely to cock leg and pee on the vegies or other unwanted places). I liked blue colour over red, but the score on that would have been neutral, I'd take either. And I wanted a puppy ie up to about 8 months to maybe 1 year old and fluked a 10 week old puppy - that just happened to be there when I go there and the 6 month old red heeler x turned out to be adopted already and a boy dog not a girl dog like the website said...

    rescues and pounds are traumatic places to visit, so it pays to plan a few visits - not necessarily to adopt, but just to get used to the place, and have faith that all the other dogs available - will find the right homes for them if you leave them there. Ie much better to leave the dog there for their right person, than you take home the "wrong" dog.

    still thinking a beagle fits your criteria best so far of the purebreds. And they don't mind being outside dogs. They'd rather be in with you but they cope outside.
    Awesome. Thanks for the advice.
    I will also add the beagle to the list of possibilities.

    Quote Originally Posted by chubbsecurity View Post
    Ok Matt, I am sorry for posting whilst wearing my cranky hat.
    I have now had some snuggle time with the pooches and feel a lot better.

    In a nutshell: a cattledog:

    Is highly intelligent and easily trained.
    Can deal with time alone (as long as he has a vantage point to keep watch)
    keeping watch is working.
    Is well behaved inside with the family. Looking after the children is also working
    Likes being talked to and will quickly pick up and respond to words and phrases.
    Does shed like crazy twice a year but the hairs are NOT fine. Be prepared for some extra vacuuming.
    Is no more high energy than any other breed. All dogs need exercise.
    Is quiet, I have never had a barking issue ever.


    I have had the pleasure of owning (?) 2 cattle dogs.
    The first was an ex working dog 5 years old (Ozzy) who just moved in and became a sofa decoration.
    He was highly intelligent, loving, and a loyal bodyguard to his family and chosen friends.

    After he passed at 15, we bought a ACD puppy from a farmer we knew.
    Chubb was just a normal joyful puppy.
    We lived in a house on 700sq mtrs with no grass or yard to speak of.
    The whole back of the house was pool and tiled surrounds/decking.

    There was a nice off leash park just up the road so I walked him there,
    every morning and every evening and we would play and meet other dogs
    and owners from our street. He was happy with his two outings daily and also
    playtime at home with our kids.

    A common reason given for surrenders is - "he needs a bigger yard" or
    "he needs acreage so he can run around". This is utter rubbish.
    The dog needs love and attention, a walk and some playtime with his family.

    I have 2 cattle dog rescues here at the moment.
    After all they have been through, they are still loving and joyful and it will be hard
    to part with them, one is adopted already and the other is not physically strong enough yet.
    They have been no trouble at all, they ask for very little, just a meal and a hug, a walk
    or ball game. They wait patiently and quietly, not a whimper, ever, until I go to them with the
    leash or ball and then the ears prick up and the tails go wild with delight.

    I hope you find a dog that can bring this joy to your family.
    Oh that's okay. I want a dog to snuggle with and make me feel better.

    Thank you so much for that. You've answered pretty much any question I'd had about the breed. You just about described everything I want in a dog...but it might take some convincing to make the others feel the same way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Matt may not go about making this decision in a way that you would but I think there have been some overreactions here. I for one am quite impressed about him not getting the potential puppy farm dog based on the advice he was given here. Lots of people would have just gone ahead.

    It is important to remember that most of the people who post here are a bit dog crazy, tend to know their breeds or know where to get reliable info on them and have a good idea about what to expect when you get a new dog or pup. People who have not owned a dog before just don't have that background knowledge and it can take a while to get your head round it. And this is probably exactly why Matt came here. Unlike me, who got my first dog on a whim without any research or knowledge at all. And then chose my second dog based on that experience.

    But I second the taking a step back and letting it all sink in, Matt.

    ETA: And I think no first dog owner really knows exactly what they are committing to. Bit like becoming a parent. Nothing really prepares you. My first dog wasn't an ideal match for me but I still loved her to bits and tried to make her happy until she died.
    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by farrview View Post
    I worked out what size and style of dog we wanted. My partner was keen for a medium size ( he is very tall). I was keen for intelligence as training and interacting with the dog is important for me. I didn't actually want long hair but fell in love and added extra grooming instantly into the equation!
    I have bought books, talked to people, trawled through this forums postings and asked questions.
    I am very happy with my choice but she suits me! I have a lot to learn but so I did when my first child arrived!
    You will need to make the decision knowing that once you buy that dog his/her wellbeing is your responsibility for the next 12 - 20 years? Your children may well be adults when she finishes her span. I find that length of commitment daunting and so should we all. We also know it is worth it.
    Great to hear, and thanks for the input.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nev Allen View Post
    Matt, I have the ideal dog for you. It is a toy and you will find it at Toy'sR US - just kidding.

    The Toller is a good dog. I have trained a few in our agility club and found them friendly, intelligent, easy to train but energetic. You will need to train the retrieve so you can throw a tennis ball for her/him.
    Hahaha okay.

    Thanks for sharing. I think I'm going to explode it I get one more option, though

    Quote Originally Posted by cavalierqld View Post
    Wow this thread has taken on a life of its own, a lot of great helpful info and a lot of over anal-izing.

    Matt - good on you for taking the time to find a dog that fits your family but at the end of the day...if you choose the dog for temperment and level of activity and maintainance then a dog is a dog no matter what colour or type.
    But as you know, you will be helping dogs everywhere in the long run by choosing not to buy from a large profit kennel.
    And after all your thought, you may just walk into a rescue and find your lifelong family member in the form of something small and fluffy or tall and wirey and nothing like what you had imagined.....and be very happy with your choice.
    Thanks for that.

    Okay, I need to stop reading and take a break. See you soon, everyone.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •