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Thread: Hungarian Vizsla

  1. #1

    Default Hungarian Vizsla

    Wanted to know what everyone thinks of the breed. Loving the idea of a short coat! We want a fairly active dog, a go anywhere type of thing. No long hair and something that will get alone very very well with a playful cat. Is a vizsla the right choice?

  2. #2
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    Hmm, well I have never heard of that breed but what about a Staffordshire Terrier? They are very family orientated, very versatile and if brought up with a cat from a young age, I am sure they would be ok. I am not a cat person, so I cannot speak from experience. My dog Oskar is an AMSTAFF x, and is a lounge lizard, but at the same time, loves a run and a play, though being in the puppy stage still, he can be quite boistrous.

  3. #3
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    A vizla is a sight hound isnt it? So those i know with sight hounds, have issues with them, spotting something say 200 miles away, and just taking off! With no attention to the recall to boot. These are pet owners, not trainers, or those that attend training though. Just foksi meet on the dog walk.
    Lots of prey drive, and a fast moving cat, mmmm i wonder.....

    If you are the type that will attend puppy pre school, then forget training. dont get a vizla. they are very intellegent, fast, hyperactive, impossible to tire out physically, and bloody hard to tire out mentally. Short hair that weaves into the fabric of your clothes so that it doesnt brush off. But a gorgeous red colour! so you'll be stylishly hairy. My sister has one as a gun dog. Its very well trained, soft in mouth, and 100% accurate on the water retrieves, so must have a great nose!


    I think any cat can be taught to be nice to the puppy. and visa versa, if you do it from the off when they are young. Have a crate and some nerves of steel for the day your kitty sinks its claws into your baby for being nosy.

  4. #4
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    Vizsla is a great dog if you are prepared to train them and do a lot of active work with them. they are great dogs to take hunting. They are more like the German short haired pointer and the English Pointer ( but I think more sensitive) and are not a sight hound. I have a few trainer friends who use them as work dogs (gun dogs) and love them..........They are extremely active and if with the wrong people hyperactive. yes they are short haired, or you can get the ones with a rough coat. I personally think they are a great dog when trained........I know my friends love them. One is wire haired and the other is a smooth

    Here you are straight copied temp info

    "Vizslas are very high energy, gentle-mannered, loyal, caring, and highly affectionate. They quickly form close bonds with their owners, including children. Often they are referred to as "velcro" dogs because of their loyalty and affection. They are quiet dogs, only barking if necessary or provoked. Sometimes when these dogs feel neglected or want something, they will cry.
    They are natural hunters with an excellent ability to take training. Not only are they great pointers, but they are excellent retrievers as well. They will retrieve on land and in the water, making the most of their natural instincts. However, they must be trained gently and without harsh commands or strong physical correction, as they have sensitive temperaments and can be easily damaged if trained too harshly. Vizslas are excellent swimmers. Like all hunting dogs, Vizslas require a good deal of exercise to remain healthy and happy.
    The Vizsla thrives on attention, exercise, and interaction. It is highly intelligent, and enjoys being challenged and stimulated, both mentally and physically. Vizslas are very gentle dogs that are great around children. The Vizsla wants to be close to its owner as much of the time as possible. Many Vizslas will sleep in bed with their owners and, if allowed, will burrow under the covers."
    Pets are forever

  5. #5
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    My friend has 2 vizslas (Zoe and Lani).

    They are gorgeous girls. Superbly trained and super obediant. They are very active with their dogs and take them hunting for possums (in NZ where they are a pest) and also long runs etc.

    The onyl thing I have noticed with them is, they seem to bond quite strongly with one person.

  6. #6
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    no Viszlas are gundogs from Hungary. They need an active family and one that will take the dog with them not just leave it every time they go out. Very intelligent but no more hyperactive then any other gundog breed. Trick is to go visit a few breeders and check the parents, make sure the temperament is confident but not too crazy lol.

  7. #7

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    I love the breed. We had a rescue that was a cross for a short while and she was delightful. Very attentive once she was 'switched on' but super active

  8. #8

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    We live in a coastal area near a river with a big 6 foot fenced yard. We're reasonably active but I think the addition of a dog would make us a lot more active. My cat is just over a year and very much dog like (loves to play, knows basic commands). I'm hoping that a vizsla would be a good replacement for my room mates cat who is my cats play mate. Could anyone suggest other breeds that would be good with cats?

  9. #9

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    Don't get a dog that needs more exercise than what you do already. A lot of people choose a dog with a higher energy level then themselves because they believe they will become more active once they get they dog but usually they don't and they end up with a very hyper dog.

    A dog cannot replace another cat IMO. Dogs and cats play differently from each other, this doesn't mean they wouldn't play together and get along though. Most dog breeds will get along with cats if properly socialised from a young age.

    Maybe look at dogs that have a lower prey drive and that don't require heaps of exercise?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by xx_sheena_xx View Post
    Don't get a dog that needs more exercise than what you do already. A lot of people choose a dog with a higher energy level then themselves because they believe they will become more active once they get they dog but usually they don't and they end up with a very hyper dog.

    A dog cannot replace another cat IMO. Dogs and cats play differently from each other, this doesn't mean they wouldn't play together and get along though. Most dog breeds will get along with cats if properly socialised from a young age.

    Maybe look at dogs that have a lower prey drive and that don't require heaps of exercise?
    Good post! And I couldn't agree more with the bold bit.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

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