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Thread: Escaping SBTxRidgeback

  1. #1

    Default Escaping SBTxRidgeback

    Hi, am new to this site but would appreciate some help or ideas of any kind.... My daughter rescued an 8 month old staffy x ridgeback in January 2012 from the RSPCA. Since day 1 he has escaped everyday from the yard of her rental property.

    The fences are 6 foot high all round with a gate in the driveway. She has extended the gate twice to about 7 foot, however left a 5 inch space which we closed in on the weekend as the dog climbed the gate and escaped through the space. She has videoed him climbing a bushy tree to scale the fence, so she removed the tree.

    She has installed an electric dog fence to 3 sides of the fence,( is set on very low) and he doesn't go near them. Her dad built a 7 foot fence to one side of the house where the fence was only 5 ft. He has chewed the back door trying to get inside. My daughter works 4 1/2 days but her housemate studies and is home most of the day, The dog stays inside with her during the day and is inside all night. He gets a walk daily, and she takes him with her when she goes visiting.

    He is a beautiful natured dog, and adores my daughter and she him. He doesnt need a chain when walked as he sticks by her side, even if he sees a cat or another dog. He is very obedient re; sit/ stay/ come / no.

    Apart from chaining him,we are at wits end on how to stop him from escaping as soon as she leaves the house.( within 5 mins of her leaving) clearly he has separation anxiety. She lives in a quiet street and all the neighbours know the dog and so far have kept him till she gets home or puts him back in her yard. ( he has a collar with her phone no on it) We are worried he will escape and get run over, and or the neighbors will tire of keeping till she gets home and let him wander the streets. There is little more we can do to the yard to keep him in.

    She refuses to return him to the RSPCA, as she is afraid they will euthanise him due to his seperation anxiety and escapee record.
    Wondering if anyone has experienced any similar behaviors with their dog, and how they fixed it.

    Thank you in advance to anyone who has any ideas.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 03-27-2012 at 10:05 PM. Reason: Moved to thread on its own and put blank lines in for readability

  2. #2

    Default

    best thing you could do is return the dog, once the dog is over to them theres no knowing what will happen, but just weigh up the options and make a decision.
    Thanks

    Scott

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Abbie, you may want to copy and paste your post into a new thread. You'll get more responses that way. Click on the Post new thread button at the top left.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
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    Default

    Abbie

    I think the best thing now is to crate train the dog - could be done over a weekend - get a metal crate, or a special built dog run with a concrete and mesh floor and a roof. And use treats to train the dog to love being in there.

    Crate Training : The Humane Society of the United States

    A dog that is trained to go in a crate with rewards (eg treats) will regard that as their special den and feel a lot more secure about being in there than being left in the back yard alone. When I first got my puppy - when I had to go out, she was locked in the crate, inside the house. Now she doesn't often get locked in - I use the crate more for training games (she will run fast into it and out of it as part of the games), but I know if I have to leave her somewhere - she will be happy in her crate and she knows I will come back to the crate for her.

    http://www.k9pro.com.au/pages/Behavioural.html

    Crates and dog runs are much safer options than tying the dog up. If your daughter is not willing to secure her dog, the best option would be to return it to the RSPCA or other pound. Otherwise you risk it becoming involved in a road accident or dog attack - and that's worse, in my opinion, than the risk of PTS back at the RSPCA.

  5. #5

    Default

    She needs to consult with a qualified behavioural trainer. Separation anxiety is no easy fix, nor is it a life any dog or doggy parent should have to lead.

    If you tell us your daughters general location I am sure we can suggest a good behavioural trainer in the are.

  6. #6

    Default

    some of these ideas are great! speaking of create training we had one for my beagle when he was a puppy, a safe place for him, his little space and when we went to bed we locked it up, when we went out we then did not want him in the garden, so we decided to make a beagle proof barrier, we had placed a baby gate on the laundry door so he had more space. Then as he grew we installed a dog flap that lead form the laundry into an inclosed paved area for him, you would have to proof oit for the SBT x RR but should be good
    Thanks

    Scott

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Separation anxiety does usually need someone to help..........But sometimes working at getting the dog to be used to be separate from your daughter whilst she is home often helps too..start this for short periods. Just do not pay the dog any attention for periods when she is home. leave the dog in another area to where she is and do not fuss too much over the dog...No greetings when you first get home, ignoring the dog for periods.

    Also make a fully enclosed run for the interim. To keep the dog safe. We have one kennel room/run...Just for that with our new Rescues.

    It can be a long road with lots of patience required and hopefully some good help
    Pets are forever

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    Default

    Id just like to mention, that an assumption has been made, one of separation anxiety.
    Electric fence to 3 sides of garden that the dog does not go near, its generally cheap to run an extension accross the remaining 4th side of garden. That'd be my first option for containment. Crate training would be 2nd.

    I have inlaws, they have a staffy: each time my sister in law becomes pregnant, the staffy starts running away. Its the best escapologist ever! This is not seperation anxiety. It is a dog reacting to change in its family pack.

    My neighbour has a ridgeback/staffy escapologist: gets out every day and comes into our garden to play with the dogs. This again, is not separation anxiety.
    this is a high pack drive dog, meeting its needs. But a staffy x out on its own in victoria, is likely to be PTS due to scares and rabid legislation re pit bulls etc. So we changed the environment rather than the dogs behaviour, and built a hole that the dog could come directly into my garden from and go back again. Now doesnt have to jump the fence onto the street area to get back into my garden. Environments are far easier to change than behaviours, so that electric fence is sounding good eh?

    Reducing the area (crate/laundry/bathroom are good containment areas), playing the radio in the background, juicy marrow bone sawn in half length ways whilst absent, baby step desensitisation. So leaving dog for ever longer periods of time and never going back to the dog whilst its whinning, ever! When you are at home. Will pave the way. Frozen chicken stock in a coke bottle which you've stabbed holes in are good entertainers, timer bubble machines in garden, water play pool, dirt digging area, all things that a dog can entertain itself with in your absence. A tad hard in a crate though.

    Set a time limit on handling this yourself. Then if not improving by that date, book a animal behaviourist for a consult home visit.
    There are pounds that gaurantee the dog wont be PTS. Some dogs just are not good at being alone.
    Medication options from vet might help.
    Working out where you dog goes when it gets out, what it does when it gets out also helps. I had a collie once that would get out, run 3 miles to the police station, where they'd feed it bacon sandwiches. You get my drift? how rewarding is getting out for your dog>?
    Last edited by bernie; 03-28-2012 at 07:21 AM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you everyone for your replies,
    My daughter has since been in touch with a behavior trainer and explained the situation. She recommended many of the things you guys have, and is trying them all. When the dog escapes, he only wanders in her street or at most the next street. (Glenelg SAust.) Most of the neighbors know his bad habits and return him to her yard or ring her at work.

    Bernie, I'm not sure if the old man up the road ( lost his dog a short while ago) who takes him for a walk during the day is feeding him bacon sandwiches but I maybe he is unknowingly enticing to visit him during the day.

    Surrendering the dog is not an option for her as she is too attached and refuses to give him back to the pound without exhausting all possible avenues.

    I think we will try and extend the electric fence as option one, and continue to put some of your ideas into practice. If all fails, I guess medication is the last option until he learns.
    Patience, I guess is all that's left to try.

    Thanks again, will keep you posted..

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Maybe the old bloke down the road would be interested in doggy day care for a small additional fee...

    If you could persaude him to only feed bacon sandwiches when he's training or when he goes home ie for being home or going through the gate home eg something yummy to put in the crate...

    My dog - given the opportunity - tours our street to visit all her friends who live there. She loves cadging pats. Fortunately she only picks times when I'm home and can go get her. I see her nick off... arghh. Tonight was a first. She went out to greet a friend who was at the door and friend let her go - I didn't expect that to happen, and evil hound nicked off... but she came right back when I called her. She seemed surprised that the gate was shut, she had jumped the side fence and is perfectly capable of jumping the front fence, but maybe not in the dark. The back yard is much more secure.

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