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Thread: Show dog questions.

  1. #61

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    I joined this form to learn so I hope Calavier Qld can tell me what are the breeds in serious trouble, so I can avoid them. Thankyoualot.
    This is my first thread. It doesn't read so good, maybe I wont get another dog.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaL View Post
    I joined this form to learn so I hope Calavier Qld can tell me what are the breeds in serious trouble, so I can avoid them. Thankyoualot.
    This is my first thread. It doesn't read so good, maybe I wont get another dog.
    Oh dear. Some breeds are in better states than others, but really you have to choose the dog that suits you. Just because a whippet might live for longer than a Bernese Mountain Dog, doesn't mean you should buy a whippet when you really want a BMD...
    It's also very much about the breeder. Work out what breed you want, then find the right breeder and you should have a pretty good run of it. And welcome

  3. #63

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    Can I go somewhere to find the names of unhealthy breeds? There is no point in choosing a breed which is sickly when I can choose a healthy one, is there?

    cavalierqld
    Again, I am registered, for the sole purpose of keeping informed with breed and health related issues and do choose to "flout"the rules and not to register my beautifully bred,FULLY HEALTH TESTED and assessed, healthy purebred puppies (only 2 litters, in 6 years) as I dont show, and dont agree with certain aspects of the institution in general, but VERY interested in the future of purebred dogs in general.
    Why bother being a member? And I understand from breeders I have contacted that members must register all their pups, so how can you not register some of them?

    it seems from your signature that you have king charles cavaliers? I understand that they have a lot of health problems, and the english kennel club was going to ban the breeding because their heads were too small for their brains , Is that true, do they have a lot of health problems? I think we want something larger than that, but it is good to know.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Brisbane
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    2,388

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaL View Post
    Can I go somewhere to find the names of unhealthy breeds? There is no point in choosing a breed which is sickly when I can choose a healthy one, is there?

    .
    The point is to find a breed that suits your life, and then find a good breeder of that breed...the you wont (or are less likely to) get a sickly dog.

    At the end of the day , "sickly" dogs arent that common fgs. Most dogs are wonderfully healthy. If you are worried your dog "may" get sick, honestly, dont bother getting one. Its a risk you run no matter the breed or who you get the dog from.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Sunshine coast Qld
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    From what i've seen there is a lot of snobbery with regard BYB, when realistically the vast majority of dogs out there do come from BYB. I certainly understand the argument against, particularly re puppy farms but also re health testing and i for one will be only buying from registered breeders in the future. However i'm not convinced that the scorn placed on ethical BYB is particularly fair ... for example, i bought Jack from a BYB, they had a bitch who they bred(and this was a one dog home and she slept on the owners bed and the bond between dog and owner was obvious), they were quite particular about whether i would be a suitable owner of the breed etc etc. Its a very complex argument and i sit on the fence(except that next time i'll buy from someone who i know has done all the health checks and stuff).
    Your so right, labels can be very misleading, and the irresponsible breeders certainly taint the reputations of those responsible breeders either registered or not.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  6. #66
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    Jul 2011
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    Sunshine coast Qld
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaL View Post
    I joined this form to learn so I hope Calavier Qld can tell me what are the breeds in serious trouble, so I can avoid them. Thankyoualot.
    This is my first thread. It doesn't read so good, maybe I wont get another dog.
    Every breed has a comprehensive list of any genetic disorders they or may not have which you can find online. Some breeds are relatively free from any serious problems, others not so lucky. But if you find a responsible breeder, you know they have done there very best to ensure you have a healthy pup.
    Last edited by cavalierqld; 03-21-2012 at 08:57 AM.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  7. #67

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    Emma that is interesting. If you have already spoken to breeders - what breeds were you looking at? And really the breeders are the best ones to tell you about their dogs. Cavalier is a member as she says, to stay informed of the condition of her chosen breed - seems quite straight forward to me. I don't know that you are who you say you are but I am learning to be more careful with my assumptions. What you're saying doesn't really make sense though. The dogs from which my dog was derived tend to be healthy and long-lived, with to date no exceptions, however this doesn't mean that I would recommend them to everyone. Certain breeds will suit you more so than others - once you have narrowed it down you can bring health considerations into the picture. For example, my sister wanted a toy breed - she narrowed it down to pugs, chihuahuas and papillons. We went with papillons in the end because they typically have fewer problems than pugs and are more trainable and arguably intelligent than chihuahuas (and pugs).

  8. #68
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    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    EmmaL

    Australian Cavs are much less likely to have the problems of the English Cavs. They have different family lines.

    Personally I'd avoid Labradors - because lots of them have joint problems (Hip Displasia), but if you love Labradors it's possible to find breeders who are doing their best to reduce the chance of their dogs having hip problems.

    In my opinion - with most breeds (a few excepted), you're more likely to find breeders that can show you their genetic tests and hip scores for their breeding dogs - among breeders who are registered with the ANKC.

    There are some breed characteristics that cause problems that will be obvious to you by just looking at them. Eg the dogs with short noses like Pugs, Pekinese, and British Bulldogs - can have trouble breathing. And some of them are great snorers.

    Dogs bred to have wrinkly faces like Shar Pei, and some Mastiff breeds - can have eye and eye lid and eye lash problems that require surgery to fix. Quite a few bug eyed breeds can have something called "cherry eye" which requires surgery to fix.

    And there are a few dog breeds that can have problems you can't see,

    Dalmatian Club of Victoria - The Dalmatian
    Dalmatians can have problems with urine crystals and some deafness. There's quite a few breeds that can have more deaf puppies than normal, Australian Cattle dogs are another - they have dalmatian as part of their ancestry but deaf dogs go back a long way.

    And dogs can rack up ginormous vet bills that have nothing to do with their genetics, eg they eat some snail bait, or a poisonous snake or frog, they get hit by a car or get in a fight. Some of these things are more preventable than others but accidents happen. Lots of people feed their dogs bones, but some dogs inhale the bone and need emergency operations to get it out.

    And most every animal will get sick and decrepid when it is old.

    And any breed where the breeder is focussed on cute puppies and a quick profit - tend to have health problems. These are often the designer dog breeds, poodle crosses, maltese x, etc. I've seen these with dodgy teeth - which leads to digestion problems, some have dodgy backs - and can end up paralized and I've seen quite a few blind ones. Extremely cute but expensive.

  9. #69

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    If you whant me to I send you the dog showing manuls to you
    If you are reading this then you're doing just fine as to
    I'm not going to tell ya I lost the ' , . ? ! " Keys to my head
    No grammar no problem I don't know how to fly it any way Bye

  10. #70
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmmaL View Post
    Can I go somewhere to find the names of unhealthy breeds? There is no point in choosing a breed which is sickly when I can choose a healthy one, is there?

    cavalierqld


    Why bother being a member? And I understand from breeders I have contacted that members must register all their pups, so how can you not register some of them?

    it seems from your signature that you have king charles cavaliers? I understand that they have a lot of health problems, and the english kennel club was going to ban the breeding because their heads were too small for their brains , Is that true, do they have a lot of health problems? I think we want something larger than that, but it is good to know.
    Cavaliers certain do have their fair share,and MORE of genetic conditions and diseases.

    The most serious, being a condition known as syringomyelia (SM), which has been described by veterinary neuroligogists as one of the worst genetic conditions affecting dogs today and which occurs as a result of the skull being too small for the brain.

    They described the brain as a "size 10 foot that's been shoved into a size 6 shoe" and estimated that up to 1/3 of the breed, mostly in the UK, which is the breeds founder country, suffers from this problem.

    SM progresses from a cavalier feeling hypersensitivity in its neck area, with an uncontrollable urge to scratch at its neck and shoulders, to severe pain around its head, neck, and shoulders, causing it yelp or scream, followed by destruction of portions of the cavalier's spinal cord. SM is so painful that the affected dog may contort its neck and even sleep and eat only with its head held high. Some cavaliers lose full use of their limbs and bladder and bowel control; others deteriorate to the point of paralysis.
    "It's described in humans as one of the most painful conditions you can have; agonizing pain, a burning pain, a piston-type headache, abnormal sensations even to the light touch ... even a collar, for example, can induce discomfort for these animals."

    There are thousands of cavaliers in pain across the world, today, even at a conservative estimate" , and experts point the finger directly at breeders and kennel clubs.

    The original CKC, were bred as a lapdog, early pictures pre 1940's show then to have longer noses, and larger domes/heads.
    Shortly after breeders decided to breed for a more fashionable look which included a shorter nose and smaller "cuter" head size, this look has served the breeders very well in the show ring, and so, sadly these inbred deformities, Chiari-like malformation (CM), have continued to be "breed standards".
    I believe vizners and weimarinners (.excuse spelling), also suffer from this condition as do some gun dog breeds

    Another problem that plagues the breed is the heart disease, MVD. Cardiologists explain that about half of all Cavaliers aged 5 would have heart murmurs and the rate increases, such that by age 10 to 11 almost all Cavaliers would have the condition.in the cavalier King Charles spaniel, the prevalence of MVD is about 20 times that of other breeds. Also in cavaliers, the onset of the disease typically is much earlier in the life of the dog.

    It has been reported that, once diagnosed, mitral valve disease is much more rapid in cavaliers than in other breeds, possibly reaching a life-threatening stage within as little as 1 to 3 years, rather than the average 3 to 5 years. To a lesser extent, cavaliers also suffer from deterioration of their tricuspid valves.
    MVD, is the largest cause of early death in the CKC.

    Other conditions include hip dysplasia (HD), luxating patellas (knees), retinal dysplasia, are just some of the debilitating and/or painful disorders to which the cavalier breed is predisposed.

    In England in the 90's a group of veternary specialists studied MVD, and put forth a proposal to kennel clubs regarding their findings. They asked that kennel clubs regulate the breeding practices of breeders and stipulated those to be, no dog is to be bred from until 5 years and have been tested heart clear at that time, yearly heart clear test for all dogs with certificates of results on kennel club data base, and expelled from show circles.
    The kennel clubs denied these reccomendations.

    This is the reason I do not register ANY pups, my family has for for a very long time, including grandparents who showed, seen the detrimental effects on breeds due to breed standards and "appearance", and I dont agree with it for some breeds and never will.

    Over the past 30 years, none of our lines have been bred before 5yrs and still heart clear,(which means we very rarely breed) and today, all of our dogs and pups (when grown) remain heart clear, we have on occasion very carefully out crossed, seeking to improve the size of the dome and nose, whilst retaining comformation and temperment, which has been very successful thus far, but is a work in progress.
    I am very proud of our work thus far improving the health of the breed. And I sure am not alone in my thinking here, my family in victoria and myself in queensland have a large network of breeders who are abandoning breed clubs and archaic ideals, and working under guidance from vet genetic specialists..
    So you see Emma?, my puppies would not be welcome in the ANKC register, breed clubs or show ring. Because HAPPILY, we would not be able to fit the standard,
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

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