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Thread: Queensland Mastiffs ??

  1. #11

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    Seems Queensland Mastiffs are not really doing anything new - Midgard Kennels

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
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    2,388

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    I like the dogs theyve got listed for sale....very nice (from the first website red something or other).

    Specially the last one. He looks like an english mastiff but not as heavy set.

    I would buy one if it had been health checked (the line I mean not just the pup) and the parents were nice dogs.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
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    589

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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    The rottweiler is of the mastiff type though? They're crossing a mastiff with a mastiff and a mastiff to try and produce a mastiff that is more energetic and healthy. Now who knows if they're doing it properly and I certainly wouldn't defend their particular project without first confirming that they truly were properly selective about the animals used, but I personally can see why someone would attempt such a project. Putting my flame suit on here, but I have yet to see a Neapolitan Mastiff that I didn't feel terribly sorry for. Always look so uncomfortable, their wrinkles have been exaggerated terribly, their gait looks unnatural and painful, their eyelids sagging so much the hole no longer matches up to where the eye is. They are lucky if they get 3 years and then the real problems start. Now you tell me, if you were born a dog (assuming in both cases your owners would be the same), would you prefer to be one of those mutts or a pure Neapolitan Mastiff? If you read up about the history of the breed, they were supposedly initially bred to be able to run over 30km in a day, keeping up with soldiers and the like. I haven't seen a mastiff who can make it to the other end of a field, let alone 30km...

    Finding them suitable homes, health testing and selectively choosing the dogs to be part of the breeding program are all important and maybe so difficult that no breeding program can ethically be attempted these days, but, I can understand why someone would be interested in trying.
    Maybe you should just get out more?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    589

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    Like others have said it bothers me when people put names to crossbreeds as i too thinks its misleading.

  5. #15

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    Diesel (For Sale)_edited.jpg

    vs

    17085_239.jpg

    The bottom is a grand champion but I just, well, I feel sorry for that dog The top is 'just a mutt' but he looks happier to me. Just saying.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

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    The Rotti is a dog with much more energy, what I don't like is combining this with very large breeds that are generally more laid back. It's the temperament differences that I don't personally like, some people would love it, but they are not a mix of breeds I'd like to see owned by the average person.

    To me it would be like adding a terrier temperament in with one of my breeds a 33.5" (at the shoulder) 40kg dog with a high prey drive and the body to go carry out their drive. Again not a mix I'd recommend.

    Some dogs are meant to have a sad or soft expression.

    By all accounts they screen and temp test their pups, with those with less drive and protection tendencies deemed as pets and that's great. I just hope that potential owners of these dogs are very dedicated. committed and realistic of what they have taken on.

  7. #17

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    I do know what you mean in that I hate to see any terrier breed crossed with any guarding breed - I think that's asking for trouble. But I don't know that I feel rottweilers are too different from mastiffs - to me this is more like crossing 2 dogs from the same, or very similar groups. The Neapolitan Mastiffs I have seen have not been laid back, they have just been restricted by their bulk and ignore just about anything that's more than 20m away from them. Get closer than that though and they'll have a go...

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Sydney
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    You see to me there in lies the problem, they've now been given the physical ability to carry it out.

    It sounds like these dogs are being bred for the fearless temperament and physical strength and size. I'm just not sure there is a big need for these type of dogs in todays society, where owning a dog is getting more difficult. But each to their own.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    589

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    Mac i have to say do not be fooled by a Neo's bulk or by 99bottles take on them, just saying. As an owner of a neo i find peoples ignorance of these dogs ability astounding. My dog although heavy is rather lean and is capable of very high speeds albeit not over huge distances. His has an ability to jump a fence of 1.6metres with ease though this has been discouraged by raising the height (also helped settle the neighbours ).
    I'm not denying there are some pretty average examples around (even some of the champions yes) but dont tar the whole breed especially if you havent had first hand experience with them. They are wonderful dogs and apart from one small op on a rolled eyelid all has been well health wise.
    Previous to neo's i had 3 rotties and whilst thier stamina and agility would no doubt be alot more than that of a Neo, thier straightline speed wasnt close nor was thier strength. Rotties certainly arent as clumsy as the Neo's either.

  10. #20

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    $10 says the avarage Neo has more stamina than my white Poodle... 10 minutes of exercise and that dog flakes it.

    You can't judge a whole breed by a few bad examples. Look at the Basset Hound, they cop just as much flak for loose skin and short legs but I don't know any personally that look like the disgustingly badly bred ones people use in example photos.

    As for bad champions, blame the judges. There needs to be a better judges education program, especially things like refresher courses for older judges. If the judges put a bad dog up continuously, pretty soon other breeders are going to try and aim for the look of the "bad" dog.

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