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Thread: my dogs are unsecurely fenced apparently?

  1. #21
    Beloz's Avatar
    Beloz is offline + Banjo the bitsa
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    If my neighbours had guns, I also wouldn't trust on a rusty nail to keep my gate up, Di. But like with lots of things in life, you weigh up the likelihood against the consequences. I regard the likelihood of my child drowning when swimming unsupervised moderately high and the consequences devastating, so I supervise her. On the other hand, the likelihood of her falling out of a tree is about the same, but the consequence is likely to be broken bones instead of death, so I take the risk.

    Likelihood of my dog escaping is low, consequence is pretty minor as she is friendly to people and dogs, there are no cattle nor farmers with guns, barely any traffic in our street, no busy roads nearby and lots of people in the neighbourhood know us. But if it were my own property, I would still put in a new gate eventually. It being a rental makes it not worth the cost and effort for the benefit it would give us.

  2. #22
    Lala is offline Senior Member
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    I agree, sometimes you take the risk of a what if...my daughter is allowed to climb trees and crap like that too. Shes allowed to swim by herself but ONLY if we know she is down there so one of us knows to look out the window every few mins and make sure she is OK.

    Fortunately children can understand the risks and are a bit more proactive in ensuring while taking a risk, they are doing it in the least risky way (if that makes sense at all). Bit hard explaining to a dog why you dont want them bolting out the gate ever.

    I generally live life with a "what will be, will be" attitude, but I am responsible for the lives of my dogs (they cant be held accountable for their own) so I make sure the temptation is not there.

    Perhaps I have this attitude to fencing etc because I have had an escape artist who could get out of anything, and we spent lots of money at the vet for that privilege.

    It's kinda similar to off lead walking too. You can never ever 100% trust your dog to not run off. I cant remember if it was here, or on another forum, but I c an remember reading a story of a dog who had been walked off lead for its whole life. Was well behaved etc. But one day, it bolted across the road (for a dog or soemthing) despite never having done this before, and that was the end of that.

    To each their own ya know....I dont have a problem with anyone who doesnt want to heighten their fences, or who trusts their dogs. Thats great, its all good. I guess it is a lesson learnt for me (which cost a lot of money in vet bills), and one I am glad of learning.

  3. #23
    Lala is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    If my neighbours had guns, I also wouldn't trust on a rusty nail to keep my gate up, Di. But like with lots of things in life, you weigh up the likelihood against the consequences. I regard the likelihood of my child drowning when swimming unsupervised moderately high and the consequences devastating, so I supervise her. On the other hand, the likelihood of her falling out of a tree is about the same, but the consequence is likely to be broken bones instead of death, so I take the risk.

    Likelihood of my dog escaping is low, consequence is pretty minor as she is friendly to people and dogs, there are no cattle nor farmers with guns, barely any traffic in our street, no busy roads nearby and lots of people in the neighbourhood know us. But if it were my own property, I would still put in a new gate eventually. It being a rental makes it not worth the cost and effort for the benefit it would give us.
    Yea consequence is a definite factor. We dont live on an overly busy street, but its busy enough that the risk of one of our guys being hit by a car is pretty high. There are also some nasty blind corners in our street which help with it being "high"

  4. #24
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    Having lost my two GSD's through a (slightly dodgey) wire fence such as you describe, I would def look at what they are telling you. From experience I can tell you that waving goodbye to your freinds is WAY harder then any fence building you will do or the injustice you feel at being told that your fences arent adequate.

    Get 120cm high chicken mesh, galvanised, its $300 or so a roll. Have 20cm folded onto the ground to prevent digging and the other metre upright as a fence. Then put two plain wires across the top so the fence is in total 1.5m high. The top wire, put it on electric fence plastic (or ceramic) holders and then electrify it. That way if you GSD does jump they will get zapped and re think it.

    People shoot, with guns and arrows, dogs seen in State and National forests. There is no second chance. If you do get a second chance then saying good bye after the fact will be the worse thing you EVER do. I cant even replace the fence mine went through, nearly a year on I am still waiting on the Lands Dept (NSW) arbitrating on the case!!
    Last edited by kerriek_99; 03-03-2012 at 05:10 PM. Reason: forgot to add

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    99bottles is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanty View Post
    We back onto state forest and before we moved in we installed 6ft chain mesh fencing. I would rather be safe than sorry. I think the thing is, the warden is going on about what could happen and is probably trying to prevent an incident. I have dogs who can but will not jump too but because they are dogs, I would not 100% trust them.
    I don't trust people 100% either lol - if it has feelings and moods and is affected by the environment around it well who knows what can happen?
    ChoppaChop likes this.

  6. #26
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    People are the last thing I trust when it comes to dogs. I have lost a dog, shot by ranger for no other reason than he was a Rottweiler. Had a witness that he was not doing anything but walking beside the creek. Time frame that he was out was not long enough for him to have done anything wrong, also no report of him doing anything wrong. But he was shot anyway. So I am a bit paranoid about fencing and keeping dogs in.

  7. #27
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    "walking beside the creek" and "no report of him doing anything wrong"

    Most states require dog to be on lead in a public place unless sign posted otherwise.

    If you're in a rural area, or the dog goes in a national park - the rangers are going to shoot first and ask questions later. Feral dogs are extremely hard to catch and wary of people - the ranger wouldn't get a second chance. Dogs are not allowed in most National Parks at all.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanty View Post
    People are the last thing I trust when it comes to dogs. I have lost a dog, shot by ranger for no other reason than he was a Rottweiler. Had a witness that he was not doing anything but walking beside the creek. Time frame that he was out was not long enough for him to have done anything wrong, also no report of him doing anything wrong. But he was shot anyway. So I am a bit paranoid about fencing and keeping dogs in.
    The reason I do not own one of my favourite breeds, GSD"s, is because if they ever got out accidentally, they would be shot. No questions asked. We live rural with a lot of stock around. Our neighbour has sheep.

    Everyone knows my dog are newfies and everyone knows their personality and friendliness. If they ever got away by accident, they stand a fair chance of being caught and returned to home.

    One truck driver made every effort to stop for a black sheep early in the morning (darkish) because he thought it was one of our dogs...He told me he would have run over the sheep if he had known it was a sheep. Left quite a few skid marks

    It is sad but true, that we have to be 100% responsible for keeping our dogs in. I use a netting fence that has a electric horse-fence on the top wire. Each new rescue has given it a go. And each one has decided fences bite.
    They won't even go through the property fences without electric. It also contained our high jumping Kelpies.
    Pets are forever

  9. #29
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    We lived in a built up area then. We did have a witness but not the money to fight it in court. This ranger eventually got the sack as he shot too many Rottweilers in the area. We now live in a completely different area and shire. It is why I am paranoid about my dogs being contained properly.

  10. #30
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    Hi Lala, ive chosen to respond to you, as your post most embodies the dog warden's expressed opinion.
    so, for a dog that does agility, can scale a 6ft wall, fly over a 6.5' fence, climb trees! for goodness sake lol, how high would the fence have to be?

    Bernie is just approaching 3 yrs of age. He has always been able to escape our garden. He never has. Bernie cannot leave our side, our home. He is very very obedient. We hunt some mornings, rabbits. He will be in peak prey drive, when chasing the rabbit. Once the rabit runs through a garden fence, Bernie will not jump the fence to get it. Despite desparately wanting to, his screaming in frustration tells me he really really wants to. But he never has.

    Bernie wont leave my side. In 3 yrs, Bernie has NEVER not instantly returned to my side when called, regardless of distraction.

    I know that we can never say never with dogs. But a 6' fence wont contain my dog, its his training and position in his family pack that keeps him on the property.

    The warden has advised a extra bit of fencing, to give the' illusion' that he cannot get out. (give who?)
    This to me is bloody idiotic, unnecessary expense.

    We live rurally, there are no cars, just acres of Forrest and walkers/ramblers that pass our garden.

    IM happy to go to court. If the dog warden wants to spend rate payers money on taking me there.
    The dog has never got out. Is very friendly to people/dogs/ducks/geese/toddlers etc.

    I dont see the problem.
    Shame the dog warden doesnt focus on the cruelty to the pug next door. Who is separated from the family who own it, by a 6 foot drop as their house is on stilts, and the dog cant get up, and the family cant get down.

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