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Thread: my dogs are unsecurely fenced apparently?

  1. #11
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    I would make it higher too, go with the star posts and strung wire. It may really help in the long run as you wouldn't want to get offside with council.
    You think your dogs won't get out and could very well be right however the warden perceives that they could in fact do so if they wished and the best thing to do is comply and get them off your back. It also shows that you are rectifying a possible future problem which could be to your advantage if there are any complaints in the future.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Some dogs can jump 6ft fences without blinking. Yet no one goes around telling all dog owners with 5ft fences their fences are too low? I think the actual height of the fence is totally irrelevant. Unless you keep your dog in a run, in lots of cases a dog in a panic would be able to get out of the yard somehow. How are you going to test that if the dog shows no inclination to leave the yard on its own?
    I know some dogs can jump 6 ft fences. We had a staffy/boxer x who could clear 6ft without even touching the fence or having a run up.

    My point is, you minimise the risk of the dog getting out by making sure your fences are high enough. The same way you minimise the risk of a small dog getting out by blocking any gaps they might possibly be able to squeeze through.

    I don't really care what the council is saying, I think for the dogs safety it is just the best action.

    For example, I know Barney can jump fences if he so wishes (not overly high, hes too heavy, but he can get a fairway off the ground). he doesnt show any inclination to get out either (despite the fact he still has his nuts) but I always make sure that any house I rent has fences I know couldnt jump even if he wanted to (easy really because as I say, he is too heavy to jump to high). Or Pippi, she can fit through the tiniest gaps. Lately she hasn't shown any inclination to get out, but I have still blocked any hole where there is even a remote possibility of her forcing herself through.

    Its not because I am worried about the council or worried about people that might be "scared" of them. The reason for it is purely for their own safety.

    A waist high fence on a guy who is 6 foot tall is not very high at all (3 or 4 foot absolute max). A GSD could just step over that if they so wished. I think it just makes sense to make it higher for their own safety. Then you cant have any idiot saying on the dog just bit me over the fence, or some other rubbish like that...

  3. #13
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    I just think a dog warden shouldn't be able to walk around making up their own rules as they please. If he finds your dogs are not secured properly he's got to give a reason and specify what needs to be fixed so you have a base to discuss the issue. Otherwise you'll just set yourself up for more. I.e. raise the fence by a foot and be told that this is still not enough. Raise it by two and learn that chicken wire is not sufficient all together.

    If your warden can't come up with an answer and/or there is no rule I think it's in your responsibility to make a decision. I.e. how far do you trust your dogs We have a waist high chicken wire on one side of our property and no plans to raise it. In fact I sometimes don't even bother closing the gate when I'm home because I know our dog won't leave without us. The day he proves me wrong is the day this gate is going to be closed tightly at all times, but until then I'm happy. I have to say that we don't border on a road though... and there are no chicken in any of our neighbours gardens, which would definitely be a tough test for our dogs self control

  4. #14
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    Totally agree, Margoo.

    And my dog nor my old dog would run off either. The furthest they would go if the gate is left open is the neighbour's lawn. Where I don't want them to be, so I do fix the gate if it breaks, but one part of the gate is held together by like one rusty nail and I don't bother making it stronger because I know Banjo won't go looking for a way to escape.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    I just think a dog warden shouldn't be able to walk around making up their own rules as they please. If he finds your dogs are not secured properly he's got to give a reason and specify what needs to be fixed so you have a base to discuss the issue. Otherwise you'll just set yourself up for more. I.e. raise the fence by a foot and be told that this is still not enough. Raise it by two and learn that chicken wire is not sufficient all together.

    If your warden can't come up with an answer and/or there is no rule I think it's in your responsibility to make a decision. I.e. how far do you trust your dogs We have a waist high chicken wire on one side of our property and no plans to raise it. In fact I sometimes don't even bother closing the gate when I'm home because I know our dog won't leave without us. The day he proves me wrong is the day this gate is going to be closed tightly at all times, but until then I'm happy. I have to say that we don't border on a road though... and there are no chicken in any of our neighbours gardens, which would definitely be a tough test for our dogs self control
    I know you say you dont border on a road...but putting that aside, what if the day he proves you wrong he gets hit by a car and dies?

    It's not about trustng the dogs IMO. I mean, I can leave my gate open too and Barney will stay in the yard no problem...but *what if* one day, he decides not to? I would rather not risk it even if its a tiny risk.

    This is based on the same reasoning that my daughter, despite being an excellent swimmer, is not alowed in the pool without anyone knowing that is what she is doing so we can keep an eye on her. The chance of an accident is just not worth the risk...

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    I know you say you dont border on a road...but putting that aside, what if the day he proves you wrong he gets hit by a car and dies?

    It's not about trustng the dogs IMO. I mean, I can leave my gate open too and Barney will stay in the yard no problem...but *what if* one day, he decides not to? I would rather not risk it even if its a tiny risk.

    This is based on the same reasoning that my daughter, despite being an excellent swimmer, is not alowed in the pool without anyone knowing that is what she is doing so we can keep an eye on her. The chance of an accident is just not worth the risk...
    Well said, Lala- couldn't agree more. The old adage of shutting the gate after the horse has bolted isn't such a silly one. To be proactive and minimize risk is far more likely than being reactive and hoping the risk is minimal. I know my dogs are smart- but I'd much rather do the safety thinking on their behalf. And if my yard is 'too secure'? All the better, IMHO.

  7. #17
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    Hi Bernie

    Can people knock on your front door without interacting with your dogs? I think that is a legal requirement, maybe an intercom gets around that?

    As for the secure thing - if dogs are looking scary through your fence (barking and lunging), that's enough to get you in trouble. If they never got off the back step, it would be all good but if they had a go at the ranger or anyone else walking past - and they rang the ranger... then you need to do something about it. Mabye a second fence back from your boundary so that your dogs cannot reach or sniff or scare the crap out of people walking past.

    As for keeping the view - the wire fences seem to be the go. There are plenty of variations that would work.

    And chicken mesh is unlikely to hold an excited dog. Doesn't seem to stop one getting in the chicken coop if it wants to either. Tennis court mesh (chain link?) is better and you can see through that easily.

  8. #18
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    I actually think it is about trust more than anything else because 'what if' is such a bad slavedriver. I think it's about balancing a risk. If I'd be living next to a busy road I wouldn't take the risk either. But *even if* our dog gets out he has quite a distance to run before he gets to a real road. And there are plenty of distractions on the way that would probably be far more interesting then the road itself.

    I mean sure he could decide one day to visit his sister and get hit by a car on the way. He could choke on a bone I gave him. He could find a snake in our snake-repellant-free garden or he could die in a car crash because I haven't got a crate for him in the car. Mind you I myself could die in the same crash because my car is crappy and doesn't even have bloody airbags.

    In any case I'd be devastated (if I still have a chance) and would probably blame myself for whatever I did or didn't do. Yet I have no reason to believe that he would wander off - not while we're home anyway because he never set one paw outside the gate without our permission. So I trust ...I don't know who really my dog or life itself that things will be allright.

    I don't have children by the way Probably better - I'd be a terrible mum. My kids would be allowed to swim in the lake without anyone watching just like we did

  9. #19
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    I think like you on this, Margoo. And I do have a child and give her lots of freedom too. Not around water yet - that is a very real risk with kids, but when I come out of the supermarket I often find her sitting up in a tree.

    If you really want to take the what-ifs seriously, we would all keep our dogs in a run. Or at least have 7ft colourbond fences. There are plenty of dogs advertised in shelters with a note that they can jump a 6ft fence so even if your dog has never tried to jump your fence, you cannot be sure that they never would. Same with digging under the fence, ripping out fence palings, etc. So most dog owners compromise with a "that'll do" solution and that has all to do with trusting your judgement on what your dog will and won't do. And less with what the dog is capable of.

  10. #20
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    I certainly won't be a "that'll do" owner with my dogs. I HAVE to make sure they stay put or they could be shot if they get into neighbouring stock. I guess it depends on how much you want to try and prevent the what ifs.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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