Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Help!

  1. #1

    Default Help!

    I know you have probably read a hundred threads like this but I am out of options and I am hoping you can give me some advice. I don't think my family likes my dog and I don't know what to do! My wife and I bought our 4 month old Cockerspaniel / Beagle cross about 3 months ago. He's a gorgeous white with black spot puppy but he is having a real hard time fitting in to the family. I have a 3 year old son and a new born. My wife and I originally thought it would be great for my son to have a family dog. Someone to play with and mess about with. Problem is my son really does not like him either. As we are now discovering puppies are quite hands on with little children with a lot of nipping and biting and jumping up and scratching. My son really does not like the dog. He is always screaming and running away as the puppy is chasing him down and nipping at him. Its really disappointing for me to see and im constantly having to keep a watch on them playing together and always end up shooing the dog away. How long will this go on for? Will it also happen with my new born son?

    We have always given the puppy everything he needs. We spent good money on obedience training which worked really well, he eats really well (raw chicken carcases the whole bit) and I even repaired my gardens after he destroyed them. grr. but the reality is I just dont see us getting any joy out of him. Every time he is around he seems to be doing something which is annoying someone so he gets excluded. The whole cliche with the dog on the lawn wrestling around with the kids just has never happened. I honestly cant think of any times where there was a lot of joy in his company. It just seems like now that everything is a battle with him and we are always growling at him for doing something wrong.

    I thought we were a dog family, but i think I was wrong. Help! He's a gorgeous puppy but I don't think we are the right family for him. Every time I bring this conversation up with my wife she dodges the issue. I dont know what to do but I do know that I do want the puppy to have the great life he deserves.

    HELP!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    1,828

    Default

    Just persevere, puppies and children are so similar. Have you taken your pup to puppy preschool? What ever you do, do not leave your 3yr old alone with the puppy. Some one will end up hurt either it be pup or toddler. Do you have a playpen? You could give both their space by altenating between playpen. Give the puppy some time, he is only little, he won't grow up straight away. Oskar is 8mths old, and still tries to dominate my girls aged 5 and 7, but usually thats after they have pestered him for a while. They love him to bits, and before we got him, my 5yo was terrified of dogs, now she lays all over him lol. He isn't a battery operated toy that you can't switch off when you have finished playing. Things are going to get wrecked when you have a puppy. Give him old things that he can chew, like old toys of your son's. You have to supervise puppies, like you have to supervise small children. Please give it a little more effort before you think of giving the pup up.

    Nipping is normal puppy behaviour, it is up to you to discourage him, or he will think it is ok.. Like a child biting. Reward the pup everytime he obeys you. Make him sit and wait for dinner, make him sit before you throw a toy, make him sit before he gets a treat. Look, I am not a professional, just a puppy owner who has gone through the same stages. I am sure you will get some other advice as well. Take him for little walks to tire him out, maybe let your son assist in holding the leash, so he feels like a big help. Teach your son to ignore puppy's bad behaviour, my youngest daughter still has tears when Oskar is a bit rough, but we are teaching her to be firm.
    Last edited by Oskar's mum; 02-21-2012 at 12:30 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Obedience training is one thing, but you also have to train your dog to just have good manners at home. I understand your frustration, but instead of getting annoyed with the naughty stuff he does, try to see it as a challenge to teach him to behave the way you want him to. No dog knows just automatically how he is supposed to behave around humans. He acts like he did when he was with his litter and you need to teach him what you want him to do instead.

    Instead of just excluding him, use time-out. If he jumps or nips, put him in a separate room for only like a minute. Let him out again and if he does it again, back in time-out he goes. Reward him for being calm and for not jumping or nipping.

    I would also try to work with your son to not run or scream as the pup will just see that as encouragement.

    I suggest you make a list of the behaviours that annoy you and then write next to each behaviour what you would like him to do instead. Then you train that behaviour in a similar way that you trained obedience.

    The pup is only a toddler and he needs you to tell him what he can and can't do.

    My daughter never showed much interest in our old dog when she was little. Now she is 7 and we got a new dog 6 months ago and they do have wrestle matches. I spend about as much time training my daughter as I did training the dog though!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    He is only 3 months old. He is going thru terrible teething at the moment. And this accounts for much of his biting.

    A very young puppy is not a childs play thing or visa-versa.

    You and your wife need to interract with the dog, teach it gentle play methods, replacing your hands/clothing etc with dogs toys. Take him out for short walks twice daily.

    And when both the child and the dog are highly excited separate them, children squealing is highly excitable to a dog, especially a young pup.

    Putting a child and a dog together requires supervision, intervening when either get too excited and diverting their attention.

    Can I suggest you google articles on "not magnetizing children and dogs".

    It may be time both you and puppy enrolled in obedience classes at your local obedience club, they will give you ongoing tips and help on how to manage what is typical puppy behaviour.

    And if it does all get too much for you please make sure you don't dump him at a pound, look into a no-kill shelter. Having a toddler and a baby is a lot of work, adding a puppy is like adding another toddler to the mix, they take time to train and mould into your way of life and require the same amount of patience. I know I have 7 dogs, one of which is a 6 month old puppy, and we have to puppy proof our place, forgive him when he does typical puppy stuff, though at 6 months old he has grown out of the nipping stage as his adult teeth are thru.
    Last edited by MAC; 02-21-2012 at 07:24 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Im sorry, I get a bit frustrated when I read posts like this.

    Dogs dont come perfectly behaved. Babies are babies regardless of the species and they do lots of things that they arent meant to until they learn what they are supposed to do.

    I cant believe you havent got any joy at all from your pup. I mean, yes, pups can be naughty and do lots of bad stuff but they are hilarious and gorgeous and I personally find joy in just about everything they do.

    Maybe you arent a dog family. But in the same token, if oyu put the effort in (with the dog and with the children), it does get easier.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I do agree with Mac that dogs aren't toys you get for children. If you nor your wife like having a dog, don't keep him for the sake of your kids but look for a better home for him. I got a dog for me in the first place but I made sure I got one that was playful for my daughter's sake. But if I would not really love having a dog, there is no way I would have gotten one just for her.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    My wife and I originally thought it would be great for my son to have a family dog.
    This was the pitfall to your plan. A dog is not a toy, it is a living being with it's own set of quite specific needs that will eat a lot of your time, effort and money. You have only begun to scratch the surface of how much effort, particularly a cross between two strong hunting breeds can be. He is 4 months and you have had him 3? So he was very underage and unsocialised when you got him? Half your problems.

    The best option would be to rehome the dog to a suitable owner and wait another few years when you two as adults have the time to manage a dog. You seem to have a rather Hollywood notion of dog ownership - trust me little to none of them will be like what you think. Just like babies don't just coooo there with big blue eyes until a stepford-esque wife with a perfect figuir and no bags under her eyes coddles it lovingly. Unless you are willing to put in more time and effort, plus have the patience and understanding that a dog is a dog and will do things that dogs do. Personally, wait. Enjoy your children and your time together, get a dog when you have the time and do more research in the mean time.
    Last edited by Nekhbet; 02-21-2012 at 08:36 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    I'm rather confused;

    As Nekhbet pointed out- your puppy is 4 months old, and you've had him for three of those months? Also, you said you'd been to obedience, but at 16 weeks, I would have thought that could only have meant 4 weeks of obedience, max- unless you mean puppy preschool?

    Training a dog isn't just something you do, then never do again. Especially with youngsters. It's one of those ongoing things where you and your dog learn how to live with each other and learn how to communicate, set rules and boundaries and generally set up what will be your life together. I think you are asking rather alot of a very young puppy. Would you ask the same levels of understanding from your young children?

    I'm inclined to think that you might be best to seriously consider rehoming this puppy before things become any worse. Perhaps the decision to have a dog is one you need to rethink now you have discovered that the reality is quite a bit more difficult and different to what you expected.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    I assumed it must have been a typo and they bought 'a' 4 months old puppy about 3 months ago, i.e. puppy = 7 months now?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    I assumed it must have been a typo and they bought 'a' 4 months old puppy about 3 months ago, i.e. puppy = 7 months now?
    Ahhh... Yes, re-reading the OP, you might be quite right...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •