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Thread: Design a new breed

  1. #41
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    I actually find this topic quit einteresting.

    I have no problem if someone wants to create a new breed as long as they are responsible in doing so.

  2. #42

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    I don't mind talking about it in a fun way, tea-cup Great Danes and such, but as said earlier we don't cull anymore (desexing is the new culling now) and these "in-between" pups have to find homes. There would literally be hundreds of puppies before the desired traits are achieved.

  3. #43
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    Personally I like what is already on offer. I wouldnt change the breeds I own in any way.

    In terms of making some breeds smaller so they fit better in an apartment, I think that could be fraught with certain dangers. For example a minature of a highly active working breed dog that is probably unsuitable for apartment living is still going to require the same exercise attention as their full size counterparts. Mini size does not equate to mini exercise needs LOL

  4. #44

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    Yup, which is why we acknowledge that as being the biggest obstacle (ie the finding of homes for pups along the way). But just because it will be hard, expensive etc doesn't mean we're just going to give up on our dreams.

    I'm jealous of the people who have found the perfect dogs and don't want to change them in any way. I have found dogs that carry perfect traits, don't see why I can't try to combine them to create the perfect dog. I believe the forefather of my favourite breed (the doberman) did pretty much the same, and how lucky we are that he was so committed. Times change and continue to change, dogs have always evolved alongside us. To adhere now 100% to current interpretations of arbitary standards and try to preserve what they are today (ie to claim that today they are the best they have ever been and ever will be) I think is truly naive and unfair on dogs.

  5. #45
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    While I am on the other side of the care scale really - as in, I don't know why you would want to improve any dog as my dog is always just perfect to me and I am so not fussy - I do totally agree with the notion that there is no good reason to stop improving breeds - or creating new ones - now. Most current breeds were developed when people had a very different lifestyle and very different requirements for their dogs too.

  6. #46

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    I will design a dog just for looks XXXXL Amstaff

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    Yup, which is why we acknowledge that as being the biggest obstacle (ie the finding of homes for pups along the way). But just because it will be hard, expensive etc doesn't mean we're just going to give up on our dreams.

    I'm jealous of the people who have found the perfect dogs and don't want to change them in any way. I have found dogs that carry perfect traits, don't see why I can't try to combine them to create the perfect dog. I believe the forefather of my favourite breed (the doberman) did pretty much the same, and how lucky we are that he was so committed. Times change and continue to change, dogs have always evolved alongside us. To adhere now 100% to current interpretations of arbitary standards and try to preserve what they are today (ie to claim that today they are the best they have ever been and ever will be) I think is truly naive and unfair on dogs.
    What is truly naive and unfair on dogs is producing litters just to achieve a new breed that serves no purpose. If you have a genuine reason to create a new breed and there are no purebreds that already fit the bill then fine... but don't forget you have to find homes for those dogs (who will simply be cross-breds) who didn't fit the description you are after. Say it takes 8 generations just to decrease size alone, and you breed once a year, that's 8 years and 48 puppies.
    Now you have decreased the size you want to work on coat type... say that takes another 8 generations to avoid throw backs from the original dogs... but shoot, now your size is creeping up again so you have to spend another 4 generations balancing the size and coat type.... Now we are up to 20 litters 20 years and 120 puppies JUST to achieve a smaller dog with a different coat.

    Plus if you are breeding properly, and for the love of your new breed those in between pups should be desexed before sale and NEVER sold for profit.

    Creating a new breed is a lot more work than people realize.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    What is truly naive and unfair on dogs is producing litters just to achieve a new breed that serves no purpose. If you have a genuine reason to create a new breed and there are no purebreds that already fit the bill then fine... but don't forget you have to find homes for those dogs (who will simply be cross-breds) who didn't fit the description you are after. Say it takes 8 generations just to decrease size alone, and you breed once a year, that's 8 years and 48 puppies.
    Now you have decreased the size you want to work on coat type... say that takes another 8 generations to avoid throw backs from the original dogs... but shoot, now your size is creeping up again so you have to spend another 4 generations balancing the size and coat type.... Now we are up to 20 litters 20 years and 120 puppies JUST to achieve a smaller dog with a different coat.

    Plus if you are breeding properly, and for the love of your new breed those in between pups should be desexed before sale and NEVER sold for profit.

    Creating a new breed is a lot more work than people realize.
    First of all I must comment that in my opinion very few breeds serve a purpose in our modern day world besides being companion animals.

    And why was it ok to create breeds a few decades ago but would it not be ok to do it now?

  9. #49

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    I never said it wasn't okay... But I don't know any BYB's who are willing to put that much work in. 20 year commitment running at a loss before you start making a profit?? Yeah right.

  10. #50
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    Why do you insist on calling anyone who isn't a current registered breeder BYBs? I think 99bottles idea is commendable and obviously they think it is worth it. Not everyone would have the means to do this, but if they do and believe in it, I think they should go for it.

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